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Topic: Low Saxon


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  A few words about Low Saxon (Low German)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Low Saxon is used as a minority language in the northern parts of Germany and in the eastern parts of the Netherlands.
Low Saxon used to be the language of the medieval Hanseatic (Hansa) Trading League that began in the mid-13th century as a protective alliance of several port cities along the shores of the North Sea and the Baltic Sea.
Low Saxon lost its influence with the decline of the Hanseatic League in the late 16th century or in the early 17th century.
www.sassisch.net /rhahn/low-saxon/lowsax-engl.htm   (1610 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Low Saxon (in Low Saxon, Plattdüütsch, Nedderdüütsch or Neddersassisch) is any of a variety of Low German dialects spoken in northern Germany and the Netherlands.
The distinction between Low Saxon and Low Franconian (on one side) or High German (on the other side) is not precisely defined; there are several clines that vary smoothly from one dialect to another.
Low Saxon was once much more widespread than today, being used as a lingua franca throughout the Baltic Sea region, under the influence of the Hanseatic League.
www.online-encyclopedia.info /encyclopedia/l/lo/low_saxon_language.html   (458 words)

  
 Low German languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Low German was the lingua franca of the Hanseatic League.
The term "Low German" is often restricted to Low Saxon, one of its three main branches, or extended to all of West Germanic except for High German.
Low German is distinguished from High German principally in that the latter underwent a consonant shift in the 700s and 800s.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Low_German_language   (430 words)

  
 Low Saxon language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Low Saxon (in Low Saxon, Nedersaksisch, Neddersassisch) is any of a variety of Low German ("Nedderdüütsch" in Low Saxon) dialects spoken in northern Germany and the Netherlands.
Low Saxon, East Low German and Low Franconian are classified together as Low German.
The distinction between Low Saxon, East Low German and Low Franconian (on one side) or High German (on the other side) is not precisely defined; there are several clines that vary smoothly from one dialect to another.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Low_Saxon_language   (809 words)

  
 Language in the Netherlands
Linguistically speaking, Low Saxon in the Netherlands is related to Low Saxon/Low German in Northern Germany which is recognized in most German states in accordance with the framework of Part III of the European Charter.
The area in which Low Saxon is spoken in the Netherlands comprises the provinces Groningen, Drenthe, Overijssel, the municipalities Eastern and Western Stellingwerf in Southeastern Fryslân and the districts Achterhoek and Veluwe in the province of Gelderland.
Low Saxon is not used in judicial arenas, but its use by defendants or witnesses is not prohibited.
taal.phileon.nl /eng/lowsaxon.php   (700 words)

  
 LOW SAXON LANGUAGE FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The distinction between Low Saxon, East Low German and Low Franconian (on one side) or High_German (on the other side) is not precisely defined; there are several clines that vary smoothly from one dialect to another.
Low Saxon was once much more widespread than today, being used as a lingua_franca throughout the Baltic Sea region, under the influence of the Hanseatic_League.
Kollumerlands (a Frisian/Low Saxon mixture dialect in Groningen and Fryslân)
www.livingflowers.com /Low_Saxon_language   (754 words)

  
 standard low saxon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Northern Low Saxon (in Low Saxon, Nordneddersassisch or Platt) is a Low Saxon dialect.
It is considered to be "Standard Low Saxon" within Germany because it is spoken and understood in a huge central area including most of Lower Saxony, Bremen, Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein.
As such, it covers a great part of the Low Saxon-speaking areas of northern Germany, with the exception of the border regions where Eastphalian,Westphalian, Mecklenburgisch and Pomeranian are spoken.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Standard_Low_Saxon   (349 words)

  
 DIALECT DESCRIPTIONS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
For all but the NORD group of dialects, the corresponding NORD Saxon Low German spelling is given, as well as the English translation of the word (in italics).
Their Low German dialect tends to use "i" instead of "ie":tid (tied, time) and min (mien, mine), as well as the 'k' sound for "ch", as in the "-ken" diminutive ending in betken (beten, little bit).
The various Low German dialects in the area east of the Elbe River are of relatively recent origin.
www.iserv.net /~bsman/dialect_descriptions.htm   (2856 words)

  
 Plattysk - Plattdeutsch - Low German   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Low Saxon dialects are therefore the oldest of the existing forms of German, whereas Middle German went partly, and the other German dialects went completely through the changes of the second sound shift.
I prefer to consider Low Saxon as an independent language which is composed of a number of dialects, but in general the language is denied this independent status.
The effort to preserve the Low Saxon language was begun at the close of the last century by various native societies.
www.rostra.dk /platt/platspro.htm   (3706 words)

  
 U.S.ENGLISH Foundation Official Language Research - Netherlands: Language issues
Low Saxon speakers in the Netherlands have called on the Council of Europe to pressurize the Dutch government into granting further recognition to their language.
Various applications for publications in Low Saxon at national cultural funds have been denied with the argument that Low Saxon is not recognized in Chapter III of the Charter.
The federation of Low Saxon organization “SONT” demands further recognition of the Low Saxon language (Nedersaksisch) which is spoken in the north-eastern provinces of the Netherlands and in the north of Germany.
www.us-english.org /foundation/research/olp/viewResearch.asp?CID=42&TID=3   (1458 words)

  
 Low Saxon language - FreeEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Since 1994 Low Saxon has been recognised by the European Union as an independent regional lanugage.
Low Saxon was once much more widespread than today, being used as a lingua franca throughout the Baltic region, under the influence of the Hanseatic League.
It served as a standard language[?] in many regions of northern Germany until it was replaced for that purpose by Standard German (a High German dialect) during the unification of Germany under Otto von Bismarck in 1870.
openproxy.ath.cx /lo/Low_Saxon.html   (414 words)

  
 Low Saxon (Low German)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Before Lowlands Saxon came to be well and truly overshadowed and suppressed by German, many of its speakers still referred to it as “Saxon” (sassysch, etc.) or “Low(lands) Saxon” (nedersassysch, etc.), some as late as in the 19th and early 20th century.
German thus became the language of prestige, and the indigenous Saxon language soon came to be relegated to the status of a working-class and peasant language.
Lowlands Saxon was officially recognized as a “regional language” in the Eastern Netherlands (1997) and in Northern Germany (1999) within the framework of the European Language Charter.
www.lowlands-l.net /talk/eng/lowsaxon.html   (2472 words)

  
 East Frisian Low Saxon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
East Frisian Low Saxon, as a member of the Low Saxon language family is a dialect spoken in the Eastern Friesland peninsula of northwestern Lower Saxony.
East Frisian Low Saxon differs from the Northern Low Saxon language by many details which are often Frisian heritage.
East Frisia and Groningen (NL) used to be inhabitated by Frisians, so the current Low Saxon dialects build on Frisian substrate, which has led to a large amount of own vocabulary, grammatical and phonological structures which differ from other Low Saxon variants.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/East_Frisian_Low_Saxon   (482 words)

  
 Hamburgisch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hamburgisch is a Low Saxon dialect and a variant of Northern Low Saxon language spoken in Hamburg, in Germany.
The low saxon language in Hamburg is divided in several subdialects, e.g.
The term Hamburgisch is also used for Missingsch, a special dialect of high German with low German grammar and loanwords.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hamburgisch   (144 words)

  
 GeoNative - Nedersaksisch - Low Saxon - Low German
Low Saxon (Low German) is a Germanic language that is the direct descendant of the Old Saxon language.
Until recently, the official line was that the Low Saxon dialects of Germany were German ones and that the ones used in the Netherlands were Dutch dialects, and they had a low social status.
The numbers of people with Low Saxon proficiency is estimated to be between 1.5 and 2 million in the Netherlands.
www.geocities.com /Athens/9479/platt.html   (464 words)

  
 Low Saxon language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Low Saxon greeting formula Moin and its duplication MoinMoin gave the name for the WikiWiki MoinMoin Project http://moin.sourceforge.net/
The Lord's Prayer in Northern Low Saxon (German based spelling)
Ethnologue report for Low Saxon (http://www.ethnologue.com/show_family.asp?subid=768) (kind of unprecise, but Ethnologue are not planning an update any time soon)
www.sterlingheights.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Low_Saxon   (885 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Low German (in Low German, Nedderdüütsch) is any of a variety of West Germanic languages spoken in northern Germany and the Netherlands.
The term "Low German" is often restricted to Low Saxon, one of its two main branches, or extended to all of West Germanic except for High German.
The other branch of Low German (besides Low Saxon) is Low Franconian.
www.online-encyclopedia.info /encyclopedia/l/lo/low_german_language.html   (266 words)

  
 lower saxon: language or local dialect? Thoughts of Plattmaster about the status of lower saxon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It was a long discussion, whether Low Saxon (Plattdüütsch, Platt, Nedersassisch or Nedersaksisch, in German Plattdeutsch or Niedersächsisch) is a language for its own or only a local dialect.
Plattdüütsch (Low Saxon) was the lingua franca of the Hanse.
This is common between Low Saxon, Frisian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian (Norse), Islandic and Faeroeric and - widely - English and Dutch.
www.plattmaster.de /language.htm   (1139 words)

  
 UWeek Vol.17, No.6 November 4, 1999   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
That's like referring to Scots as "English," or to Catalan, Galician and Aragonese as "Spanish." Low Saxon is not German, though until recently it was commonly referred to as a German dialect group, and its speakers in Germany have come to be considered ethnically German.
Today's Low Saxon is to a large extent mutually intelligible with Dutch and Afrikaans, and it also shares many features with English and Scots.
Hahn says his poetry, both in Low Saxon and English, is a way of unleashing a part of his personality that is not expressed in his job, where he must be organized and keep others organized.
depts.washington.edu /uweek/archives/1999.11.NOV_04/article27.html   (1179 words)

  
 Hööftsiet - Wikipedia
Het Platduits wordt gesproken in delen van Nederland, Noord-Duitsland, Zuid-Denemarken en West-Polen.
The pair are closely related languages (you could also say that they both form a single language) and are spoken by 12 - 15 million people on all continents except Antarctica.
The language is also closely related to other Low German languages (like Dutch), and to English; both of which developed from Old Low German.
nds.wikipedia.org   (542 words)

  
 ANS: a general orthography for the Low Saxon language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
ANS is a General Low Saxon Orthography for all Low Saxon varieties of the world, including those in the Netherlands and in Germany.
In Germany, Low Saxon tends to be known as 'Low German' ('Plattdeutsch' or 'Niederdeutsch'), while in the Netherlands it tends to be known as 'Low Saxon' (Nedersaksisch).
German-based spelling conventions for Low Saxon are perceived as foreign in the Netherlands, while Dutch-based spelling conventions are perceived similarly on the German side of the border.
ans.phileon.nl   (539 words)

  
 Low German language biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Low German (in Low German, Platt(düütsch) or Nedderdüütsch) is any of a variety of West Germanic languages spoken in northern Germany and the Netherlands.
It also includes Afrikaans, which is spoken in South Africa, and Plautdietsch, which is spoken by Mennonite communities in North America.
It tends to lead to confusion when discussing the German language: many High German dialects are called Low German, a term properly used only for the dialects and languages described here.
low-german.biography.ms   (378 words)

  
 Low Saxon language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Low Saxon (in Low Saxon, Nedersaksisch, Neddersassisch, "Plattdüütsch" or "Nedderdüütsch") is any of a variety of Low German dialects spoken in northern Germany and the Netherlands.
Plattdüütsch is the name for both the Low Saxon and the East Low German language.
East Veluws (a Dutch/Low Saxon mixture dialect spoken in Gelderland)
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/low_saxon_language   (644 words)

  
 From Rapier to Langsax
The form of the Saxon swords was of two-edged, flat blades, with a flat tang.
Hilts, and particularly pommels, varied greatly, and have been used to seriate and classify Saxon swords, but this is of little concern to us here, as they were more a matter of style than of function or technology.
Later in the Saxon period, by around the ninth century, pattern-welding was used less and less for swords "probably because better ores were obtainable" [Davidson 1962:32].
www.vikingsword.com /smithy/seax.html   (4353 words)

  
 Standard Low Saxon Definition / Standard Low Saxon Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Northern Low Saxon (in Low Saxon, Nordneddersassisch or Platt) is a Low Saxon dialect Low Saxon (in Low Saxon, Nedersaksisch, Neddersassisch, "Plattdüütsch" or "Nedderdüütsch") is any of a variety of Low German dialects spoken in northern Germany and the Netherlands.
In rural areas Low Saxon is still spoken, but declining so....
As such, it covers a great part of the Low Saxon-speaking areas of northern Germany, with the exception of the border regions where EastphalianEastphalian, or Eastfalian (in German, Ostfälisch), is a Low Saxon dialect spoken in southern parts of Lower Saxony, in Germany, including Hanover, Braunschweig, Hildesheim and Goettingen....
www.elresearch.com /Standard_Low_Saxon   (451 words)

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