Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Lucasian Professor of Mathematics


Related Topics

In the News (Mon 24 Jun 19)

  
  A Brief History of The Lucasian Professorship   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The earliest chair of mathematics in England was established for geometry at Gresham College by Robert Gresham in 1596.[Eves 1969] Cambridge University has a rich history of chairs, starting with the Lady Margaret Professorship of Divinity, founded by the mother of Henry VII in 1502.
On the continent, mathematics was moving forward with introduction of pi, e for the natural logarithm, and i for the square root of negative one.
The Lucasian Legacy: The Lucasian Professorship of Mathematics at Cambridge University, 1663-1993.
lucasianchair.org /brief.html   (4214 words)

  
 Lucasian Chair of Mathematics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Lucasian Professorship of Mathematics is the most famous academic chair in the world.
This is due in no small part to the current holder of the chair, Professor Stephen Hawking, well known theoretical physicist, and Sir Isaac Newton, second holder of the chair.
What is not so commonly known is that the chair has been held by others who represent the best and most influential minds in science and technology the world has known, as well as few not so important men.
www.lucasianchair.org   (177 words)

  
  Search Encyclopedia.com
Newton, Sir Isaac -> Early Life and Work Newton studied at Cambridge and was professor there from 1669 to 1701, succeeding his teacher Isaac Barrow as Lucasian professor of mathematics.
Newton, Sir Isaac -> The Principia Newton summarized his discoveries in terrestrial and celestial mechanics in his Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica [mathematical principles of natural philosophy] (1687), one of the greatest milestones in the history of science.
Early Life and WorkNewton studied at Cambridge and was professor there from 1669 to 1701, succeeding his teacher Isaac Barrow as Lucasian professor of mathematics.
www.encyclopedia.com /searchpool.asp?target=@DOCTITLE+Newton++Sir+Isaac   (290 words)

  
 Royal Society | Our work | Spotlight on our scientists | Scientist profiles featured this month | Big Bang and infinity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
He follows in the footsteps of Isaac Newton as the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, where he is famous for his work on the concept of real time, and how it began with the Big Bang about ten billion years ago.
Professor Hawking has also made a significant contribution to society through his books and lectures, which are famous for raising broader public awareness and understanding of fundamental physics.
Professor Stephen Hawking was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1974.
www.royalsoc.ac.uk /page.asp?id=1516   (412 words)

  
 Search Results for Lucasian
In 1849 Stokes was appointed Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge.
In 1979 Hawking was appointed Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge.
He was appointed Lucasian professor of mathematics in 1820 but this chair provided such a small income that he was happy to resign in 1822 so that he might accept the better paid position as Plumian professor of astronomy and experimental philosophy.
www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk /~history/Search/historysearch.cgi?SUGGESTION=Lucasian&CONTEXT=1   (1214 words)

  
 William Whiston   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
William Whiston (1667-1752), the third Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University, succeeded Isaac Newton.
He carefully plotted a course for this comet using all his mathematical skills to show that the answer was in the stars.
While he was in the Chair, he did what was expected for mathematics, but it was during this time that he made religious discoveries that he could not ignore.
www.lucasianchair.org /whiston.html   (1548 words)

  
 Lucasian Professor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The incumbent of the Lucasian Chair of Mathematics, the Lucasian Professor is the holder of a mathematical professorship at Cambridge University.
The current Lucasian Professor of Mathematics is renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking.
This episode is set around the year 2395, in a hypothetical future created by the entity Q.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lucasian_professor   (285 words)

  
 [No title]
Professor Hawking drew on his deep understanding of the laws of science and their effect on human life and led a discussion on how scientific and technological advancements will shape and be shaped by human knowledge.
In 1687 Isaac Newton, the second Lucasian professor at Cambridge, published his theory of gravity and in 1864 Clerk Maxwell, another Cambridge man, discovered the equations that govern electricity and magnetism.
PROFESSOR HAWKING: The most exciting discovery will probably be something we don't expect -- that is, such surprising discoveries that have led to the great revolutions in the past.
www.math.utk.edu /~vasili/va/files/whitehouseEvening/2.hawking.mar98.html   (6146 words)

  
 Ada Lovelace: Founder of Scientific Computing
Her life was an apotheosis of struggle between emotion and reason, subjectivism and objectivism, poetics and mathematics, ill health and bursts of energy.
Lady Byron wished her daughter to be unlike her poetical father, and she saw to it that Ada received tutoring in mathematics and music, as disciplines to counter dangerous poetic tendencies.
Charles Babbage, Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge, was known as the inventor of the Difference Engine, an elaborate calculating machine that operated by the method of finite differences.
www.sdsc.edu /ScienceWomen/lovelace.html   (585 words)

  
 William Whiston   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
William Whiston (1667-1752), the third Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University, succeeded Isaac Newton.
He carefully plotted a course for this comet using all his mathematical skills to show that the answer was in the stars.
While he was in the Chair, he did what was expected for mathematics, but it was during this time that he made religious discoveries that he could not ignore.
coldrain.net /lucasianchair.org/whiston.html   (1548 words)

  
 Sir Isaac Newton   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Newton arrived at Cambridge in 1661, was elected scholar in 1664, graduated BA in 1664/5 in a class of twenty-six from Trinity, and made MA in 1668.
The key mathematical problem lay in describing the path of an object as it traveled in either a straight line or a curved line.
Newton was a great man of vision in mathematics and science who kept his religious beliefs in a small circle.
coldrain.net /lucasianchair.org/newton.html   (2670 words)

  
 Isaac Newton Biography - Newton's Life, Career, Work - Dr Robert A. Hatch
In 1664 Isaac Barrow, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge, examined Newton's understanding of Euclid and found it sorely lacking.
A subtle blend of mathematical reasoning and careful observation, the Opticks became the model for experimental physics in the 18th century.
For historical, philosophical, and mathematical reasons, Newton assumed the moon's centrifugal 'endeavour' to be equal and opposite to some unknown mechanical constraint.
web.clas.ufl.edu /users/rhatch/pages/01-Courses/current-courses/08sr-newton.htm   (4208 words)

  
 Inaugural lectures at Trinity (from Sir Isaac Newton) --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - The online encyclopedia ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Descartes's statement of the sine law of refraction, relating the angles of incidence and emergence at interfaces of the media through which light passes, had added a new mathematical regularity to the science of light, supporting the conviction that the universe is constructed according to mathematical regularities.
When Newton was appointed Lucasian professor, his name was probably unknown in the Royal Society; in 1671, however, they heard of his reflecting telescope and asked to see it.
At Cambridge University he was a professor of Greek from 1660 to 1663 and of mathematics from 1663 to 1669.
www.britannica.com /ebc/article-12250?tocId=12250   (1342 words)

  
 Professor Stephen Hawking's Homepage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Mathematics was not available at University College, so he did Physics instead.
After leaving the Institute of Astronomy in 1973 Stephen came to the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, and since 1979 has held the post of Lucasian Professor of Mathematics.
Professor Hawking has twelve honorary degrees, was awarded the CBE in 1982, and was made a Companion of Honour in 1989.
www.hawking.org.uk /text/about/about.html   (534 words)

  
 BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME by Hawking, S W, HAWKING, STEPHEN (LUCASIAN PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS, CAMBRID, HAWKING, STEPHEN ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Use our email a friend feature to pass on the details of this title to friends and colleagues.
HAWKING, STEPHEN (LUCASIAN PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS, CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY)
The author begins by reviewing the great theories of the cosmos from Newton to Einstein and then delves into the secrets which lie at the heart of space and time.
www.studentbookworld.com /BookDetail/Info.asp?sISBN=0553175211   (125 words)

  
 University of Cambridge News and Events Service
Interview with Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge.
Report on criticism of recent comments by Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University, concerning the possible extinction of the human race.
Profile of Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge.
www.admin.cam.ac.uk /news/daily/archive.cgi?1003100400   (967 words)

  
 Mathematics at TCD 1592-1992
Even more remarkably some forty years later, after it had been shown that light was just one aspect of the wider phenomenon of electro-magnetic radiation, G.F. Fitzgerald showed that Mac Cullagh's aether was a suitable medium for the propagation not just of light but also of radiant heat and of electromagnetic radiation in general.
He wrote as follows to the Philosphical Magazine `when professor Hamilton announced his discovery of Conical Refraction he did not seem to have been aware that it is an obvious and immediate consequence of the theorems published by me, three years ago...'.
Whereas this may have been true the fact was that MacCullagh had not proceeded to draw the relevant conclusions from his results and his implied criticism of Hamilton was not justified.
www.maths.tcd.ie /~boutall/pub/official/400Hist/15.html   (476 words)

  
 Stephen Hawking a brief biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Stephen wanted to do Mathematics, but it was not available at University College, so he studied Physics.
After leaving the Institute of Astronomy in 1973 Stephen came to the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, and from 1979 has held the post of Lucasian Professor of Mathematics.
Professor Hawking has twelve honorary degrees, was awarded the CBE in 1982, and was made a Companion of Honour in 1989.
members.tripod.com /Barry_Stone/hawking.htm   (1213 words)

  
 Stephen Hawking - live webcast today   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Professor Hawking will be speaking to an audience of distinguished academics from across the world who have gathered in Cambridge to celebrate his 60th birthday.
Today Professor Hawking will speak at a 60th Birthday Symposium celebrating his contributions to fundamental physics and cosmology which is being held at the Centre for Mathematical Sciences.
Professor Ian Halliday, Chief Executive Officer, Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), the UK’s strategic science investment agency, said that it gives him great pleasure to be involved in this event to celebrate Stephen’s 60th birthday.
www.admin.cam.ac.uk /news/dp/2002010801   (655 words)

  
 Charles Babbage Biography, Computer models and Inventions
The academy had a big library, where Babbage used to study mathematics by himself, and learned to love it.
From 1828 to 1839 Babbage was Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge.
He contributed largely to several scientific periodicals, and was instrumental in founding the Astronomical Society in 1820 and the Statistical Society in 1834.
www.charlesbabbage.net   (1909 words)

  
 Janus: The Papers of Professor Paul Dirac
He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1930 and Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University in 1932.
Dirac loaned his early papers while he was still Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, in 1969, having already deposited the proof copy of Heisenberg's first paper on quantum mechanics earlier that same year.
Biographical information was obtained from Professor Dirac's entry in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004) and from the catalogue of the papers made in 1981.
janus.lib.cam.ac.uk /db/node.xsp?id=EAD/GBR/0014/DRAC   (516 words)

  
 Science through the Centuries: Sir Isaac Newton   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
He arrived at Cambridge in 1661, became a fellow of Trinity College in 1667 and was appointed Lucasian Professor of Mathematics in 1669.
He firmly established the University's unrivalled reputation for mathematics and astronomy that is maintained today by the current Lucasian Professor, Stephen Hawking.
In 1998 two of its fellows won Fields Medals, the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for mathematics.
www.admin.cam.ac.uk /univ/science/sciencetour/newton.html   (121 words)

  
 Board of Sponsors | The Bulletin Online
Brian Greene, professor of mathematics and physics and joint director of the Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astrophysics at Columbia University
Stephen W. Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge
Lawrence Krauss, Ambrose Swasey Professor of Physics and Astronomy and director of the Center for Education and Research in Cosmology and Astrophysics at Case Western Reserve University
www.thebulletin.org /about-us/board-sponsors.html   (817 words)

  
 Stryker - Findhorn
Sir Fred Hoyle is professor of astronomy and astrophysics at University College, Cardiff, Wales, Great Britain, and the originator of the Steady State theory of the origin of the universe.
Chandra Wickramasinghe is professor and chairman of the Department of Applied Mathematics and Astronomy, University College, Cardiff, Wales.
Writing about this same cell, Chandra Wickramasinghe, professor of applied mathematics at the University of Cardiff, Wales, reminded his readers that the statistical probability of forming even a single enzyme, the building block of the gene, which is in turn the building block of the cell, is 1 in 10
www.ankerberg.com /Articles/science/creation.htm   (6905 words)

  
 The Scotsman - S2 Tuesday - Say hello to cerebral TV   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Professor Stephen Hawking is to present a documentary on Channel Five.
In July the Lucasian professor for Mathematics at Cambridge University and author of A Brief History of Time spent five hours at Peter Stringfellow’s lapdance club, the Cabaret of Angels, enjoying the gyrations of a 19-year-old dancer called "Tiger".
Other contributors include Professor Richard Dawkins on evolution and the Nobel Prize winner Sir Harry Kroto on the origins of life.
thescotsman.scotsman.com /s2.cfm?id=1080412003   (1855 words)

  
 The Analytical Engine
Charles Babbage (1792–1871) was an eminent figure in his day, elected Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge in 1828 (the same Chair held by Newton and, in our days, Stephen Hawking); he resigned this professorship in 1839 to devote his full attention to the Analytical Engine.
You'll get a sense of how mathematics, science, and technology felt in the nineteenth century, and for the elegant language used in discussing those disciplines, and thereby peek into the personalities of the first computer engineer and programmer our species managed to produce.
If you are their intellectual heir, perhaps you'll see yourself and your own work through their Victorian eyes.
www.fourmilab.ch /babbage   (547 words)

  
 Augusta Georgia: technology@ugusta: Hawking offers view of science in the 21st century 03/07/98
Hawking, author of the best-selling ``A Brief History of Time'' and Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge, will address 160 guests at the second of President Clinton's ``millennium evenings,'' the university said.
His vocal cords were removed years ago to help him breathe, and he communicates through a computerized synthesizer that is mounted to his motorized wheelchair.
Hawking is the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University, a position once held by Sir Isaac Newton.
www.augustachronicle.com /stories/030798/tec_124-1497.shtml   (333 words)

  
 Cambridge Mathematics: National Curve Bank - A MATH Archive
Sir Isaac Newton was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Trinity.
Gordon Moore, the founder of Intel, is widely known for "Moore's Law," in which he predicted in1965 that, as a rule of thumb, the number of transistors the industry would be able to place on a computer chip would double every couple of years.
The NCB thanks Gordon and Betty Moore and the Development Office of Cambridge University for permission to use photographs from the dedication of the new Centre for Mathematical Sciences.
curvebank.calstatela.edu /cambridge/cambridge.htm   (362 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.