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Topic: Luis Alvarez


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In the News (Sun 21 Jul 19)

  
  A Science Odyssey: People and Discoveries: Luis Alvarez
Luis Alvarez was a physicist with wide ranging interests.
Alvarez was shocked and sickened by what he saw, but because the war ended so soon afterwards, he never expressed doubts about the bomb's use.
Alvarez's other claims to fame are in assisting the Warren Commission that investigated the assasination of President Kennedy and holding 22 patents, including an indoor golf-training machine he developed for President Eisenhower.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/aso/databank/entries/boalva.html   (330 words)

  
 Gale - Free Resources - Hispanic Heritage - Biographies - Luis Alvarez
Luis Alvarez's scientific contributions to the military during World War II included the development of a narrow beam radar system that allows airplanes to land in inclement weather.
Alvarez reported in his autobiography Alvarez: Adventures of a Physicist, that his science classes at Rochester High School were "adequately taught [but] not very interesting." Dr. Alvarez noticed his son's growing interest in physics and hired one of the Mayo Clinic's machinists to give Luis private lessons on weekends.
Alvarez "discovered" physics in his junior year and enrolled in a laboratory course, "Advanced Experimental Physics: Light" about which he later wrote in his autobiography: "It was love at first sight." He changed his major to physics and received his B.S. in 1932.
gale.cengage.com /free_resources/chh/bio/alvarez_l.htm   (2086 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez - Biography
Luis W. Alvarez was born in San Francisco, Calif., on June 13, 1911.
Dr. Alvarez joined the Radiation Laboratory of the University of California, where he is now a professor, as a research fellow in 1936.
He was on leave at the Radiation Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1940 to 1943, at the Metallurgical Laboratory of the University of Chicago in 1943-1944, and at the Los Alamos Laboratory of the Manhattan District from 1944 to 1945.
nobelprize.org /nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1968/alvarez-bio.html   (704 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez Summary
Alvarez's first summer as a graduate student was spent on the roof of the Geneva Hotel in Mexico City, his Geiger telescope resting in a wheelbarrow that allowed him to periodically reverse the east-west orientation of his apparatus.
Alvarez was born in San Francisco, California, on June 13, 1911, the son of a physician at the University of California.
Luis Alvarez proposed a controversial theory involving the possibility of a massive collision of a meteorite with the earth 65 million years ago, an event that Alvarez believed may account for the disappearance of the dinosaurs.
www.bookrags.com /Luis_Alvarez   (7115 words)

  
  LUIS F. ALVAREZ
LUIS F. Luis F. Alvarez was born in La Puerta, a village near Oviedo, Asturias, Spain, on April 1st, 1853.
In 1895, Dr. Alvarez resigned his position in Waialua to prepare himself for work as Superintendent of a new experimental hospital for the treatment of leprosy which was to be established in Kalihi, a suburb of Honolulu.
Luis Alvarez was an indefatigable worker, and during his many years in Hawaii, he was on call 24 hours out of the 24.
hml.org /mmhc/mdindex/alvarez.html   (775 words)

  
 Luis Walter Alvarez - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Alvarez won the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physics for "the discovery of a large number of resonance states, made possible through his development of the technique of using hydrogen bubble chamber and data analysis".
Alvarez and his student Lawrence Johnston designed the exploding-bridgewire detonators for the spherical implosives used on the Trinity and Nagasaki bombs[1].
In 1980, with his son Walter Alvarez, a geologist, Luis proposed the asteroid-impact theory to explain the iridium anomaly of the K-T extinction boundary, the observed increased abundance of iridium in strata of that time.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Luis_Alvarez   (511 words)

  
 Scientist Profiles/Luis Alvarez   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Luis Alvarez was primarily a physicist but had wide-ranging scientific interests.
Alvarez developed the detonating device for the atomic bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima and he was on the plane when the bomb was dropped.
In 1965, Alvarez went on an expedition to Egypt to work on the structure of pyramids and in 1980, while working with his son, he came up with the theory that a gigantic asteroid had collided with the Earth about 65 million years ago killing all of the dinosaurs.
www.sciencetrek.net /alvarez.htm   (98 words)

  
 MEMORIAL TRIBUTE FOR LUIS W. ALVAREZ
Luis Alvarez was a consultant over the years to numerous agencies of the United States government and was a member of the President's Science Advisory Committee in 1973.
In 1934, Luis began his long involvement with aviation, soloing "with just three hours of dual instruction." He flew for 50 years, logging more than a thousand hours as a pilot before deciding at the age of 73 that it was time to put away that demanding and delightful avocation.
Luis Alvarez was very much aware of himself and carried into his physics the constructive competitive spirit he had learned early in athletics.
www.fas.org /rlg/alvarez.htm   (2276 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez, the Hydrogen Bubble Chamber, Tritium, and Dinosaurs
Luis Alvarez, the Hydrogen Bubble Chamber, Tritium, and Dinosaurs
Alvarez improved upon [Donald] Glaser's instrument and used it to discover a large number of resonance states, subatomic particles that can't be directly detected because they live for so short a time.
Scientists As Detective: Luis Alvarez and the Pyramid Burial Chambers, the JFK Assassination, and the End of the Dinosaurs
www.osti.gov /accomplishments/alvarez.html   (291 words)

  
 Luis Walter Alvarez
Alvarez won the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physics for "the discovery of a large number of resonance states, made possible through his development of the technique of using hydrogen bubble chamber and data analysis".
Alvarez and his student Lawrence Johnston designed the detonators for the spherical implosives used on the Trinity and Nagasaki bombs.[1] He additionally did important work relating to radar and aviation, and designed a system by which airplanes could land safely in low visibility conditions, useful both to bombers and commercial aviation.
With geologist son Walter, in 1980, Luis proposed the asteroid-impact theory to explain the iridium anomaly of the K-T extinction boundary.
www.mlahanas.de /Physics/Bios/LuisWalterAlvarez.html   (348 words)

  
 Luis Walter Alvarez
Luis Alvarez, named after his Spanish grandfather, was born on June 13, 1911, in San Francisco, California.
Alvarez was saddened by the thought of all the people who had lost their lives, and later wrote a letter to his son saying that he hoped the powerful and destructive atom bomb would inspire people to prevent future wars.
Alvarez was given a piece of layered rock from the mountains of Italy that contained a mystery about the history of the earth.
www.csupomona.edu /~ceemast/original/nova/alverez.html   (739 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez Biography | World of Physics
Luis Alvarez's scientific contributions to the military during World War II included the development of a narrow beam radar system that allows airplanes to land in inclement weather.
Alvarez reported in his autobiography Alvarez: Adventures of a Physicist, that his science classes at Rochester High School were "adequately taught [but] not very interesting." Dr. Alvarez noticed his son's growing interest in physics and hired one of the Mayo Clinic's machinists to give Luis private lessons on weekends.
Alvarez "discovered" physics in his junior year and enrolled in a laboratory course, "Advanced Experimental Physics: Light" about which he later wrote in his autobiography: "It was love at first sight." He changed his major to physics and received his B.S. in 1932.
www.bookrags.com /biography/luis-alvarez-wop   (1892 words)

  
 1968 Nobel Prize for Physics - Luis Alvarez
Luis W. Alvarez was born in San Francisco, California, on June 13, 1911.
Alvarez joined the Radiation Laboratory of the University of California, where he is now a professor, as a research fellow in 1936.
Alvarez is responsible for the design and construction of the Berkeley 40-foot proton linear accelerator, which was completed in 1947.
members.tripod.com /~cyber830/l_alvarez.html   (3029 words)

  
 Luis Walter Alvarez   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Alvarez worked on microwave radar research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (1940-43), and participated in the development of the atomic bomb at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, N.M., in 1944-45.
After World War II Alvarez helped construct the first proton linear accelerator and developed the liquid hydrogen bubble chamber in which subatomic particles and their reactions are detected.
In about 1980 Alvarez helped his son, the geologist Walter Alvarez, publicize Walter's discovery of a worldwide layer of clay that has a high iridium content and which occupies rock strata at the geochronological boundary between the Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras; i.e., about 66.4 million years ago.
physics.nobel.brainparad.com /luis_walter_alvarez.html   (387 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Luis Alvaraz was born in San Francisco, CA on June 13 1911.
Luis was a physicist at the University of California, Berkeley.
Alvarez received a B.S. from the University of Chicago in 1932, a MS in 1934 and a Ph.D. in 1936.
faculty.ashrosary.org /faculty/moody/comb_webpage/luisalverez.htm   (105 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez - Biography
Dr. Alvarez joined the Radiation Laboratory of the University of California, where he is now a professor, as a research fellow in 1936.
He was on leave at the Radiation Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1940 to 1943, at the Metallurgical Laboratory of the University of Chicago in 1943-1944, and at the Los Alamos Laboratory of the Manhattan District from 1944 to 1945.
Dr. Alvarez is responsible for the design and construction of the Berkeley 40-foot proton linear accelerator, which was completed in 1947.
www.nobelprize.org /nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1968/alvarez-bio.html   (704 words)

  
 Alvarez Postdoctoral Fellowship
In the 1950s, physicist Dr. Alvarez opened a new era in high-energy physics research with his proposal to build a pressurized chamber filled with liquid hydrogen.
In his 1955 prospectus for such an experimental facility, Dr. Alvarez became one of the first scientists to propose using computing devices for analyzing experimental data, even before such computers were actually available.
The Luis W. Alvarez Fellowship in Computational Science aims to achieve these goals by supporting recent graduates (within the past three years) with a strong emphasis on computing or computational science.
www.lbl.gov /CS/html/alvarez.html   (467 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez de Lugo Opinions
"Luis Alvarez de Lugo uses in his paintings a realistic language, through landscape, flowers and portraits, filling them with life with splendorous blooms of light and color in a way similar of that of Tito Salas, or of the old Spanish school of Zuloaga, Lopez Mezquita and Alvarez Sotomayor, famous in their time.
"Alvarez de Lugo a figurative painter is an artist in the most ample consideration of the word.
"Alvarez de Lugo is faithful to the figurative gender and to this neoimpressionist style which he has constantly made a characteristic of his own, and which allows him to express with spontaneity and vitality and clear concepts, whatever the matter at hand, and always in an environment of national nature"
www.alvarezdelugo.com /html/opiniones/indexenglish.html   (413 words)

  
 Gale - Free Resources - Hispanic Heritage - Biographies - Luis Alvarez   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Luis Alvarez's scientific contributions to the military during World War II included the development of a narrow beam radar system that allows airplanes to land in inclement weather.
Alvarez reported in his autobiography Alvarez: Adventures of a Physicist, that his science classes at Rochester High School were "adequately taught [but] not very interesting." Dr. Alvarez noticed his son's growing interest in physics and hired one of the Mayo Clinic's machinists to give Luis private lessons on weekends.
Alvarez "discovered" physics in his junior year and enrolled in a laboratory course, "Advanced Experimental Physics: Light" about which he later wrote in his autobiography: "It was love at first sight." He changed his major to physics and received his B.S. in 1932.
www.galegroup.com /free_resources/chh/bio/alvarez_l.htm   (2275 words)

  
 Invent Now | Hall of Fame | Search | Inventor Profile
Born in San Francisco, Alvarez graduated from the University of Chicago with a B.S. in 1932 and a Ph.D. (physics) in 1936.
He was an assistant physics instructor from 1936 to 1938; an associate professor from 1938 to 1945; associate director of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1954 to 1959; and a professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1945.
Alvarez was a member of the President's Science Advisory Committee from 1971 to 1972.
www.invent.org /hall_of_fame/4.html   (157 words)

  
 Alvarez, Luis W. (1911-1988) -- from Eric Weisstein's World of Scientific Biography
Alvarez, Luis W. American physicist who studied short-lived resonance particles in bubble chambers.
Alvarez was also the first to notice a layer of iridium-enriched clay at the Cretacious-Tertiary (K-T) boundary.
This suggested that the impact of a meteor (which are rich in Ir) may have been responsible for the extinction of the dinosaurs, a thesis which has now met with general acceptance.
scienceworld.wolfram.com /biography/Alvarez.html   (84 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Luis Alvarez - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Mexico during his presidency, arrest for 1968 and 1971 student massacres, reform of tax structure, support for birth control, table of Mexican...
California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, College of Agriculture,...
encarta.msn.com /Luis_Alvarez.html   (119 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez at AllExperts
Luis Walter Alvarez (June 13, 1911 – September 1, 1988) of San Francisco, California, USA, was a famed physicist of Spanish descent, who worked at the University of California, Berkeley.
Alvarez and his student Lawrence Johnston designed the detonators for the spherical implosives used on the Trinity and Nagasaki bombs.
In 1980, with his son Walter Alvarez, a geologist, Luis proposed the asteroid-impact theory to explain the iridium anomaly of the K-T extinction boundary, the observed increased abundance of iridium in strata of that time.
en.allexperts.com /e/l/lu/luis_alvarez.htm   (520 words)

  
 Luis Alvarez, President, National Urban Fellows, Inc.
Alvarez was the Director of Development for ASPIRA of New York, Inc. He later became the Chief Executive Officer of ASPIRA of America, Inc., from 1972 until 1975.
Alvarez was involved in the formulation of U.S. educational policies, and assured their implementation across the United States, Puerto Rico and Guam.
Alvarez serves as a member of the Council on Foundation's, Council of Associates and he is on the Advisory Board of the Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico.
www.nuf.org /luis_alvarezbio.asp   (567 words)

  
 DTx Announced Luis Alvarez as Vice President of Operations   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Alvarez, the former Vice President of Operations at JDS Uniphase of Melbourne, Florida, has also held high level management positions in engineering and manufacturing with other large telecommunications companies.
Alvarez holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Florida Institute of Technology and a Master in Business Administration degree from Centenary College.
Luis’ professional accomplishments combined with his extensive experience implementing and managing strategic processes and improvement initiatives in manufacturing operations, make him a welcome addition to the DTx family.”
www.dtxinc.com /pr_alvarez_082004.html   (415 words)

  
 ScienceMatters @ Berkeley. Luis Alvarez, adventurer physicist
Alvarez was born June 13, 1911, in San Francisco.
Alvarez improved upon Glaser's instrument and used it to discover a large number of resonance states, subatomic particles that can't be directly detected because they live for so short a time.
In 1980, he and his son Walter Alvarez, a UC Berkeley geologist, first posited the now widely-accepted theory that a giant asteroid crashed into the Earth 65 million years ago, spewing smoke in the atmosphere that blocked the sun, eventually leading to the death of the dinosaurs.
sciencematters.berkeley.edu /archives/volume2/issue15/legacy.php   (532 words)

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