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Topic: Lydia (satrapy)


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 Lydia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It remained a satrapy after Persia's conquest by the Macedonian king Alexander the Great, going -after his death caused the empire to fall apart- to the major Asian diadoch dynasty, the Seleucids, till this was unable to maintain its territory in Asia Minor, Lydia falling to the Attalid dynasty of Pergamum.
Lydia is a historic region of western Anatolia, congruent with Turkey's modern provinces of İzmir and Manisa.
When Cyaxares attacked Lydia, the kings of Cilicia and Babylon intervened and negotiated a peace in 585 BC, whereby the Halys was established as the Medes' frontier with Lydia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Maeonia   (1352 words)

  
 Paphlagonians (950-65 BC) - DBA 2.0 Variant Army List
Paphlagonia was conquered at some point during the reign of King Croesus of Lydia (560-546 BC), and liberated by Persia during the reign of Cyrus the Great, becoming an independent satrapy of the Early Achaemenid empire.
When Agesilaus, the Lame King of Sparta, landed an army in Asia Minor in 396 BC and outfoxed the Persian satrap Tisaphernes in a series of campaigns, Paphlagonia joined a number of states in the region who lent aid and troops to Agesilaus until he was recalled by the Spartan ephors in 394 BC.
In Homer's Illiad, Harpalion, son of King Pylaemenes of Paphlagonia, attacked Menelaus, seeking to avenge the death of the Trojan Pisander.
fanaticus.org /DBA/armies/paphlagonians.html   (1728 words)

  
 Cyrus the Great on Encyclopedia.com
He defeated and captured Croesus (546 BC), and Lydia became a satrapy under the Persian government.
Croesus of Lydia, Nabonidus of Babylonia, and Amasis II of Egypt, joined by Sparta, tried to build a strong alliance against him, but to no avail.
Cyrus demanded the surrender of the Greek cities that had been under Lydia, and they also became satrapies of Persia.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/c/cyrusg1re.asp   (787 words)

  
 Cyrus the Great - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Newly developed administrative techniques created by Cyrus and his succesors Darius and Xerxes, including the Satrapy system of local governership were later adopted by the Greeks and Romans centuries later.
But they also consider him as being married to Princess Mandane of Media (ماد), a daughter of Astyages, King of the Medes and Princess Aryenis of Lydia.
Astyages had been in alliance with his brother-in-law Croesus of Lydia (son of Alyattes), Nabonidus of Babylon, and Amasis II of Egypt.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cyrus_II   (1436 words)

  
 Cyrus the Great on Encyclopedia.com
He defeated and captured Croesus (546 BC), and Lydia became a satrapy under the Persian government.
Cyrus demanded the surrender of the Greek cities that had been under Lydia, and they also became satrapies of Persia.
Cyrus overthrew Astyages, king of the Medes, sometime between 559 BC and 549 BC He entered Ecbatana and, taking over the Median kingdom, began to build a great empire after the Assyrian model.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/C/CyrusG1re.asp   (625 words)

  
 AncientCreations.com...Sharing The Experience of the Ancient World
After this defeat Lydia became the main satrapy in the west, with Sardis at its center and close political contact was maintained with the Greek states.
By the reign of its last and legendary King Croesus, Lydia encompassed and held stable dominion over the whole plateau of Asia Minor, as far as the river Halys.
The incalculably wealthy King Croesus was defeated in battle against Persia at Pteria in 546 BC.
www.ancientcreations.com /coinhistory2.asp   (933 words)

  
 f. The Late Dynastic Period (25th-31st Dynasties). 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
In 343–342, Artaxerxes III led a successful invasion, Nectanebo fled to Ethiopia, and Egypt was again made a Persian satrapy.
Amasis allied himself with Babylonia and Lydia against the rising power of the Persians, but saw his allies defeated in turn by Cyrus the Great.
He used Greek and Carian mercenaries sent by Gyges of Lydia to suppress local dynasts (See 685–547).
www.bartleby.com /67/95.html   (791 words)

  
 Cyrus the Great
B.C.), and Lydia became a satrapy under the Persian government.
Croesus of Lydia, Nabonidus of Babylonia, and Amasis II of Egypt, joined by Sparta, tried to build a strong alliance against him, but to no avail.
Cyrus' objectives were to gain power over the Mediterranean coast, secure Asia Minor, and civilize the east.
www.afghanchamberofcommerce.com /history/cyrus_the_great.htm   (302 words)

  
 Leaders and Battles: Cyrus,
He later captured Croseus and Lydia became a satrapy under the Persian government, as did the Greek cities that had previously fallen to Lydia.
He fought against Croseus, who had allied with Amasis II of Egypt, Nabonidus of Bablyonia, and an undecided battle was fought at the Halys River near Anatolia.
He carefully planned his strategy to gain power over the Mediterranean coast, secure Asia Minor, and civilize the east.
www.lbdb.com /TMDisplayLeader.cfm?PID=5429   (192 words)

  
 Leaders and Battles: Cyrus,
He later captured Croseus and Lydia became a satrapy under the Persian government, as did the Greek cities that had previously fallen to Lydia.
He carefully planned his strategy to gain power over the Mediterranean coast, secure Asia Minor, and civilize the east.
He fought against Croseus, who had allied with Amasis II of Egypt, Nabonidus of Bablyonia, and an undecided battle was fought at the Halys River near Anatolia.
www.lbdb.com /TMDisplayLeader.cfm?PID=5429   (192 words)

  
 TISSAPHERNES - LoveToKnow Article on TISSAPHERNES
When, therefore, in 408 the king decided to support Sparta strenuously, Tissaphernes was removed from the generalship and limited to the satrapy of Caria, whereas Lydia and the conduct of the war were entrusted to Cyrus the Younger.
On the downfall of Athens, Cyrus and Tissaphernes both claimed jurisdiction over the Ionian cities, most of which acknowledged Cyrus as their ruler; but Tissaphernes took possession of Miletus, where he was attacked by Cyrus, who gathered an army under this pretence with the purpose of using it against his brother Arta-xerxes II.
But Tissaphernes was unwilling to take action and tried to achieve his aim by astute and often perfidious negotiations; Alcibiades persuaded him that Persia's best policy was to keep the balance between Athens and Sparta, and rivalry with his neighbor Pharnabazus of Hellespontic Phrygia still further lessened his energy.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /T/TI/TISSAPHERNES.htm   (930 words)

  
 Anatolia: The Last Ten Thousand Years
Atys was her omprehensively defeated (although somewhat unfairly, some would say, because Cyrus apparently used the smell of his pack camels to deter the Lydian cavalry) in 547 B.C. Sardis was taken and Lydia became a Persian satrapy.
Ten kilometers to the north lies Bin Tepe, the Lydian necropolis, where there are scores of burial mounds dating from the great age of the Lydian kingdom.
There's not much left now of the Lydian city, although American excavators claim to have found the remains of the first ever mint (see CROESUS).
www.mfa.gov.tr /grupc/cj/cja/cjaa/iron.htm   (930 words)

  
 Biblical History: Lydian Kingdom
The once very wealthy Lydian Empire became a Persian satrapy called Saparda (Sardis).
The Kingdom of Lydia enters the world scene in 660 B.C., when the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal demanded tribute from the Lydian king, "Gyges of Luddi." The grandson of Gyges, Alyattes, built the Lydian Empire during his fabulous fifty-seven year reign.
Though, as was his custom, Cyrus dealt kindly with Croesus, the Lydian king sat upon a pyre, while a servant lit it.
www.mtjuliet.org /sermons/magnify98/lydian.html   (930 words)

  
 The Liberator; Cyrus the Great - (CAIS at SOAS)
He defeated and captured Croesus (546 BC), and Lydia became a satrapy under the Iranian government.
According to Herodotus, he was killed in July 529 BCE, during a campaign in the north-eastern part of his empire, with the Massagetae, an Iranian tribe from the southern deserts of Khwaresm, Kizilhoum in the southern most portion of the steppe region.
The Chaldaean empire of Babylonia annexed to his empire in 538 BC.
www.cais-soas.com /CAIS/History/hakhamaneshian/Cyrus-the-great/cyrus_the_great.htm   (1433 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Tissaphernes
In 413 BC he was satrap of Lydia and Caria, and commander in chief of the Persian army in Asia Minor.
Pharnabazus was a Persian soldier and statesman, the son of Pharnaces, belonged to a family which from 478 BC governed the satrapy of Phrygia on the Hellespont, from its headquarters at Dascylium, and, according to a discovery by Th.
395 BC) was a Persian soldier and statesman, son of Hydarnes.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Tissaphernes   (867 words)

  
 The Granicus
In the aftermath of the battle, the satrapy of Lydia was restored to a Hellenistic state.
The generals Niphates and Petines, the satraps Spithridates and Mithrobarzanes, the nobles Arbupales, Mithridates and Pharnaces (the son, son-in-law, and brother-in-law of Darius, respectively), and the Greek mercenary commander Omares all were among the notable that fell in the battle.
Attempting to remain loyal to the Persian cause, the town was spared utter destruction by the actions of an ambassador who negotiated a pardon.
www.wargamer.com /greatbattles/TheGranicus.asp   (1743 words)

  
 de Bithynien Bithynia was an ancient district in the...
They were incorporated by Croesus Croesus within the Lydia Lydian monarchy, with which they fell under the dominion of Persia Persia (546 BC 546 BC), and were included in the satrap satrapy of Phrygia Phrygia, which comprised all the countries up to the Hellespont and Bosporus.
Herodotus mentions the Thyni Thyni and Bithyni Bithyni as existing side by side; but ultimately the latter must have become the more important, as they gave their name to the country.
www.biodatabase.de /Bithynia   (832 words)

  
 TISSAPHERNES (Pers. Cithrafarna) - Online Information article about TISSAPHERNES (Pers. Cithrafarna)
king decided to support Sparta strenuously, Tissaphernes was removed from the generalship and limited to the satrapy of Caria, whereas Lydia and the conduct of the See also:
Miletus, where he was attacked by Cyrus, who gathered an army under this pretence with the purpose of using it against his See also:
This led to the war with Sparta in 399.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /THE_TOO/TISSAPHERNES_Pers_Cithrafarna_.html   (474 words)

  
 Lydia - Free net encyclopedia
It remained a satrapy after Persia's conquest by the Macedonian king Alexander the Great, going -after his death caused the empire to fall apart- to the major Asian diadoch dynasty, the Seleucids, till this was unable to maintain its territory in Asia Minor, Lydia falling to the Attalid dynasty of Pergamum.
When the Romans entered its capital Sardis in 133 BC, Lydia, as the other western parts of the Attalid legacy, became part of Asia Minor, a very rich Roman province, worthy to keep a governor of the high rank of proconsul.
Herodotus (1.7) refers to a Heraclid dynasty of kings who ruled Lydia yet were perhaps not descended from Omphale.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Lydia   (1431 words)

  
 Ancient Districts of Anatolia and Asia Minor
Lycia and Cilicia were the only two countries of Asia Minor that were not conquered in the 6th century BCE by Croesus, king of Lydia.
From the 6th to the 4th century BCE, when most of Asia Minor was under the control of the Persian Achaemenids, Cilicia was an independent kingdom paying tribute to Persia or part of a Persian satrapy.
The Lydians are said to have been the first people to coin money.
www.ancientanatolia.com /historical/ancient_districts.htm   (2731 words)

  
 Paphlagonians (950-65 BC) - DBA 2.0 Variant Army List
Paphlagonia was conquered at some point during the reign of King Croesus of Lydia (560-546 BC), and liberated by Persia during the reign of Cyrus the Great, becoming an independent satrapy of the Early Achaemenid empire.
Paphlagonia was located in Asia Minor, lying along the Euxine (Black) Sea between Bithynia and Pontus, its borders delimited according to Strabo's Geography by the river Parthenius in the west and by the Halys in the east.
In Homer's Illiad, Harpalion, son of King Pylaemenes of Paphlagonia, attacked Menelaus, seeking to avenge the death of the Trojan Pisander.
fanaticus.org /DBA/armies/paphlagonians.html   (1728 words)

  
 A timeline of the Persians
250 BC : Diodotos, a Macedonian ruler of the satrapy of Bactria (Afghanistan), declares its independence from the Seleucids
188 BC : Pergamum conquers the Seleucid lands of Lydia, Phrygia, Lycaonia, Pisidia
192 BC : the Seleucids under Antiochus III are defeated by the Romans in Thracia
www.scaruffi.com /politics/persians.html   (1728 words)

  
 Mausolus - WCD (Wiki Classical Dictionary)
Maussolus was the son of Hecatomnus, a Carian aristocrat who had in 392/391 obtained the satrapy of Caria from the Achaemenid king Artaxerxes II Mnemon.
At various times, Ariobarzanes of Hellespontine Phrygia, Datames of Cappadocia, Mausolus of Caria, Orontes of Armenia, and Autophradates of Lydia were involved, and they received support from the pharaohs of Egypt, Nectanebo I (378-361), Teos (361-358), and Nectanebo II (358-341).
Mausolus (Greek Maussolos) was satrap of Caria between 377 and 353, and is the most famous member of the Hecatomnid dynasty.
www.ancientlibrary.com /wcd/Mausolus   (1026 words)

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