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Topic: MII (videocassette format)


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  Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Videocassette recorder   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The videocassette recorder (or VCR, more commonly known in the British Isles as the video recorder), is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable videotape cassette containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later.
The development of the videocassette followed the replacement by cassette of other open reel systems in consumer items: the compact audio cassette and Instamatic film cartridge in 1963, and the Super 8 home movie cartridge in 1966.
Consumers wary of another format war (similar to the Betamax versus VHS debacle of the early 1980s), has meant that sales of consumer DVD recorders have been comparatively sluggish, although many recorders are now able to record onto both DVD+ and DVD- media.
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Videocassette_recorder   (1863 words)

  
 VHS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
VHS became a standard format for consumer recording and viewing in the 1980s and 1990s after competing in a fierce format war with Sony's Betamax and, to a lesser extent, Philips' Video 2000.
In the original VHS format, audio was recorded unmodulated in a single (monaural) linear track at the upper edge of the tape, which was limited in frequency response by the tape speed (about 100Hz-8Khz with 42dB S/N ratio at SP).
As mentioned, VHS was the winner of a protracted and somewhat bitter format war during the early 1980s against Sony's Betamax format.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Video_Home_System   (3014 words)

  
 Video Tape Encyclopedia Articles @ HollywoodBlockbuster.com (Hollywood Blockbuster)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Panasonic trumped D1 with its D5 format, which was uncompressed as well, but much more affordable.
The first domestic videocassette recorders were launched in the early 1970s, but it was not until the Japanese systems, Sony's Beta (1975) and JVC's VHS, were launched, that videotape moved into the mass market, resulting in what came to be known as the "videotape format war", which VHS finally won.
MiniDV is now the most popular format for consumer camcorders, providing near-broadcast quality video and sophisticated nonlinear editing capability on consumer equipment; however, though intended as a digital successor to VHS, MiniDV VCRs are not widely available outside professional circles.
www.hollywoodblockbuster.com /encyclopedia/Video_tape   (828 words)

  
 Articles - Videotape   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The next format to gain widespread usage was the 1" (2.54 cm) C-format videotape from the end of the 1970s onwards.
The first domestic videocassette recorders were launched in the early 1970s, but it was not until the Japanese systems, Sony´s Beta (1975) and JVC´s VHS, were launched, that videotape moved into the mass market, resulting in what came to be known as the "format war" which VHS finally won.
In camcorders, however, the field was more diverse; early camcorders generally took full-sized VHS or Betamax tapes, but the greatest popularity for some time shared by the 8mm video format (later replaced by Hi8 and its DV hybrid relative Digital8) and VHS-C (compact) tape.
www.shopcamcorder.com /articles/Videotape   (1014 words)

  
 Video Tape and Video Cameras
Any format is sought EIAJ, quadruplex, EIAJ-1, EIAJ-2,, skip field, skip field video, non standard video, reel to reel video, vx format, ampex avr, pilot tone, M-II, MII, M format, 3/4-U skip-field, one-inch, two inch quad and helical scan units.
The format however was limited to a 30 minute recording time and used V30 CVC cassettes which was adequate for field recording but somewhat limited for situations not requiring portability.
Betamax was the first successful consumer video format, and at one time it had close to 100% of the market.
www.smecc.org /video_tape_and_video_cameras.htm   (3362 words)

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