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Topic: Magellanic Clouds


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In the News (Tue 18 Jun 19)

  
  cloud - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about cloud   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Clouds are formed when moisture in the air condenses, and are composed of millions of water droplets suspended in air.
Clouds, like fogs or mists, that occur at lower levels, are formed by the cooling of air containing water vapour, which generally condenses around tiny dust particles.
Clouds are classified according to the height at which they occur, and by their shape.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /cloud   (797 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The two Magellanic Clouds are irregular dwarf galaxies orbiting our Milky Way galaxy, and thus are members of our Local Group of galaxies.
The Large Magellanic Cloud, together with its apparent neighbour and relative, the Small Magellanic Cloud, are conspicuous objects in the southern hemisphere, looking like separated pieces of the Milky Way to the naked eye.
Eventually, it was Ferdinand Magellan and his discovery expedition who brought them to our knowledge in 1519.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/m/ma/magellanic_clouds.html   (86 words)

  
 Magellanic Clouds on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
MAGELLANIC CLOUDS [Magellanic Clouds], two galaxies located in the far southern sky and visible to the unaided eye; they are classified as irregular because they show no definite symmetry or nucleus.
The larger of the two, known as the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is located mostly in the constellation Dorado; its angular diameter measures approximately 7°.
The Magellanic Clouds, named for the Portuguese navigator Magellan, were first studied in detail by Sir John Herschel in the 19th cent.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/M/MagellaC1l.asp   (414 words)

  
 Magellanic Clouds - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Eventually, it was Ferdinand Magellan and his discovery expedition who brought them to western knowledge in 1519.
The Large Magellanic Cloud and its neighbour and relative, the Small Magellanic Cloud, are conspicuous objects in the southern hemisphere, looking like separated pieces of the Milky Way to the naked eye.
The Large Magellanic Cloud was host galaxy to a Supernova (SN 1987A), the brightest observed in over three centuries.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Magellanic_Clouds   (362 words)

  
 The Magellanic Clouds   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The Large Magellanic Cloud is at about 160,000 light years and the Small Magellanic Cloud is at about 200,000 light years from us.
Magellan's five ships and 240 men were the first from Europe to venture here, and the remnant of one ship and 17 men who returned to Spain had the distinction of being the first to sail around the world.
The Large Magellanic Cloud was the location of Supernova 1987A, which provided us with valuable information about neutrinos.
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu /HBASE/Astro/magclo.html   (144 words)

  
 The Large Magellanic Cloud, LMC
The Large Magellanic Cloud, together with its apparent neighbor and relative, the Small Magellanic Cloud, are conspicuous objects in the southern hemisphere, looking like separated pieces of the Milky Way for the naked eye.
The Large Magellanic Cloud, at its distance of 179,000 light years, was longly considered the nearest external galaxy, until in 1994, the Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy was discovered at only about 80,000 light years.
On February 24, 1987, supernova 1987A occurred in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which was the nearest observed supernova since Keplers, which occured before the invention of the telescope.
www.seds.org /messier/xtra/ngc/lmc.html   (393 words)

  
 The Magellanic Clouds
It was from observations in the Magellanic Clouds that Henrietta Leavitt discovered (1912) the relation between pulsation period and average luminosity for Cepheid variable stars.
The telescope bearing his name has been used to extend this technique beyond 70 million light-years distance, and the Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds are still the zero point for these distance measurements.
The Large Cloud was one of the favored locations to watch for gravitational lensing by dark stellar objects in the halo of our galaxy, by the MACHO collaboration (using the Great Melbourne Telecope, since destroyed by a bush fire).
www.astr.ua.edu /gifimages/lmc_smc.html   (1008 words)

  
 MAGELLANIC CLOUDS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The Magellanic Clouds (left) are two mini-galaxies orbiting our own Milky Way galaxy.
Because they lie in Earth's southern skies, they were unknown to European astronomers until recorded by Ferdinand Magellan's flotilla that circled the globe in 1520-21.
The Large Magellanic Cloud - where SGR 0526-66 is believed to reside - is 163,000 to 196,000 light years away; the Small Magellanic Cloud is 196,000 to 228,000 light years away.
www.il-st-acad-sci.org /planets/magellanicclouds.html   (189 words)

  
 The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The Magellanic Clouds are the nearest galaxies to the Milky Way, about 170,000 and 240,000 light years distant respectively.
Both Magellanic Clouds are less than 25 degrees from the South Celestial Pole and are visible at some time on any clear, dark night from Siding Spring, where this picture was taken.
To the dark adapted eye the Magellanic Clouds look like detached pieces of the Milky Way, but this apparent detachment is misleading because both are in orbit around it.
www.aao.gov.au /images/captions/misc021.html   (200 words)

  
 THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS
It states that barred galaxies with a ‘chaotic’ disk are fairly common (and no doubt are) and names the LMC as the prototype of the Magellanic Irregular classification.
The third trait shared by the Clouds is a vast diffuse pool of hydrogen, which surrounds and connects both Clouds and trails away from them toward and beyond the south galactic pole!
The current burst of star formation in both Clouds along with the Magellanic Stream can be accounted for by assuming a recent (100 million to 200 million years ago) close encounter with the Milky Way.
home.insightbb.com /~lasweb/lessons/magellanic.htm   (1645 words)

  
 The Small Magellanic Cloud, SMC
Like its larger apparent neighbor, the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Small Magellanic Cloud was certainly known to the ancient southerners, and was probably mentioned by Amerigo Vespucci in a letter written during his third voyage about 1503-4, but became known to us only when Magellan went on his journey around the world, in 1519.
The main body of the Small Magellanic Cloud has been assigned NGC 292 in Dreyer's catalog, which is now sometimes used for this galaxy.
It was the Small Magellanic Cloud where Miss Henrietta Leavitt discovered the period-luminosity relation of Cepheid variables, which is since then the most reliable method available for determining large cosmic distances.
www.seds.org /messier/xtra/ngc/smc.html   (448 words)

  
 Magellanic Clouds Newsletter Homepage
The Magellanic Clouds Newsletter covers all areas of Magellanic Clouds research - the interstellar medium, individual stars, stellar populations, abundances, star formation history, interactions within and between the Magellanic Clouds, and Milky Way, kinematics, dynamics, astrometry and catalogs, microlensing, and studies in all wavelength ranges.
    The Magellanic Clouds Newsletter is published in LaTeX, postscript, and HTML format (see past issues).
An impressive web site with general information on the Magellanic Clouds, including images and maps, can be found at http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Orbit/2142/index.html.
www.astro.uni-bonn.de /~mcnews/MCNews.html   (188 words)

  
 Magellanic Clouds Newsletter: Policies
Obviously a paper on objects in the Magellanic Clouds or on the Magellanic Clouds in general is relevant.
On the other hand, a paper on the Magellanic irregular IC XXXX would not be suitable for MCNews, but may be perfect for the dwarf galaxy newsletter "Dwarf Tales".
A paper on Be stars in the Magellanic Clouds may appear in the Be Star Newsletter and in the Hot Star Newsletter, a NIR study of Magellanic AGB stars may be published in both MCNews and the AGB star newsletter, and so forth.
www.astro.uni-bonn.de /~mcnews/MCpolicy.html   (2113 words)

  
 SJSU Virtual Museum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Leavitt's main research interest was photographic photometry, the problem of determining the brightness or magnitude of a star from a photographic image.
She also investigated variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds and discovered 1,777 new variable stars.
Based on her observations, she concluded that variable stars are probably nearly the same distance from the Earth.
www2.sjsu.edu /depts/Museum/lea.html   (140 words)

  
 The Master Catalogue of the Magellanic Clouds - MC2
We performed a systematic cross-matching of the DENIS Catalogue towards the Magellanic Clouds (DCMC) with 2MASS and the already existing optical (GSC-II, UCAC1) catalogues.
The result of this work is a multiwavelength reference catalogue of stars towards the Magellanic Clouds, to be publicly released through the data centers.
It provides an unprecedented basis for the study of stellar populations in the Magellanic Clouds and for further cross-identifications with catalogues at other wavelengths.
vizier.u-strasbg.fr /MC2   (288 words)

  
 Large Magellanic Cloud   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
"A Neutral Hydrogen Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud: Aperture Synthesis and Multibeam Data Combined" The combined ATCA+Parkes multibeam HI survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (Kim, Staveley-Smith, Dopita, Sault, Freeman, Lee, Chu, 2003, ApJS, 148, 473).
"A Fractal Analysis of the HI Emission from the Large Magellanic Cloud" Fourier transform power spectra of the distribution of neutral hydrogen emission in the Large Magellanic Cloud (Elmegreen, Kim, Staveley-Smith 2001, ApJ 548, 749).
You are invited to download spectral data or an HI peak temperature image, in a variety of formats.
www.atnf.csiro.au /research/lmc_h1   (313 words)

  
 APOD: January 24, 1998 - The Large Cloud Of Magellan (LMC)
These star clouds are small irregular galaxies, satellites of our larger Milky Way spiral galaxy.
Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) pictured above is only about 180,000 light-years distant - the only known galaxy closer is the Sagittarius Dwarf.
Both the LMC and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are joined to the Milky Way by a
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov /apod/ap980124.html   (162 words)

  
 Magellanic Clouds
Two irregular, satellite galaxies of our own Galaxy which are visible from the Southern Hemisphere as misty patches in the night sky.
The Large Magellanic Cloud and Small Magellanic Cloud are named after the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), who described them during his voyage round the world.
Riding at close quarters to each other, barely 100,000 light-years apart, it is possible that the Magellanic Clouds are destined at some time to merge into a single galaxy.
www.daviddarling.info /encyclopedia/M/MagClouds.html   (183 words)

  
 Magellanic Clouds Working Group - Welcome!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
We encourage all areas of Magellanic Clouds research - the interstellar medium, individual stars, stellar populations, abundances, star formation history, interactions within and between the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way, kinematics, dynamics, astrometry and catalogs.
We are interested in all areas of magellanic Cloud research, including all wavelength ranges and disciplines.
Our flagship product in the Magellanic Clouds Newsletter, a bimonthly publication featuring the latest in Magellanic Cloud research, as well as meeting announcements and job postings of interest to the Magellanic Cloud community.
www.astro.uiuc.edu /projects/mcnews/mcwg.php   (139 words)

  
 The Large Magellanic Cloud
The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is the nearest galaxy to the Milky Way but less than one tenth as massive; even so it contains the equivalent of over ten billion solar masses of material in the form of stars, gas and dust.
The LMC is at a distance of 160,000 light years and is visible to the unaided eye from southern latitudes, rather like a detached piece of the Milky Way.
The nearness of the LMC ensures that it is well resolved into stars in quite a modest telescope, and deep photographs reveal it to be a highly complex system with large numbers of clusters, nebulae and dust clouds scattered apparently at random across the face of the galaxy.
www.aao.gov.au /images/captions/uks014.html   (233 words)

  
 The Magellanic Clouds - Cambridge University Press   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The Magellanic Clouds a pair of nearby, satellite galaxies are caught in a dynamic struggle internally and with our Milky Way.
This is the first book to provide a synthesised and comprehensive account of the Magellanic Clouds.
For graduate students and researchers, this timely edition provides a definitive reference on the Magellanic Clouds; it also gives useful supplementary reading for graduate courses on galaxies, the interstellar medium, stellar evolution and the chemical composition of galaxies.
www.cambridge.org /catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521480701   (333 words)

  
 APOD: February 3, 1998 - A Magellanic Mural   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
Explanation: Two galaxies stand out to casual observers in Earth's Southern Hemisphere: the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC).
SMC is globular cluster 47 Tucanae, appearing here as a bright point of light.
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov /apod/ap980203.html   (137 words)

  
 Dan Welty - Magellanic Clouds
The Magellanic Clouds, systems of lower metallicity and lower dust to gas ratio than our own Galaxy, provide a key intermediate step betweeen the Galactic ISM and the QSO Absorption-Line Systems.
I have used high resolution optical profiles of Na I, Ca II, Ca I, and K I, together with UV spectra obtained with IUE, to determine accurate abundances in the various interstellar component groups observed toward the LMC SN 1987A.
The pattern seen for the main LMC (L) component (blend) is quite similar to the Galactic warm cloud pattern; the SMC (S) components resemble more the (less depleted) halo cloud pattern.
astro.uchicago.edu /home/web/welty/mc.html   (1447 words)

  
 Amazon.com: The Magellanic Clouds (Cambridge Astrophysics): Books: Bengt E. Westerlund,Andrew King,Douglas Lin,Stephen ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The Magellanic Clouds have been for thousands of years to the inhabitants of the southern hemisphere.
New Aspects of Magellanic Cloud Research: Proceedings of the Second European Meeting on the Magellanic Clouds Organized by the Sonderforschungsbereic (Lecture Notes in Physics) by B. Baschek on 4 pages
Magellan's Voyage : A Narrative Account of the First Circumnavigation by Antonio Pigafetta in Front Matter
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0521480701?v=glance   (708 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Magellanic Clouds (Astronomy, General) - Encyclopedia
You are here : AllRefer.com > Reference > Encyclopedia > Astronomy, General > Magellanic Clouds
Magellanic Clouds[maj´´ulan´ik] Pronunciation Key, two galaxies located in the far southern sky and visible to the unaided eye; they are classified as irregular because they show no definite symmetry or nucleus.
More articles from AllRefer Reference on Magellanic Clouds
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/M/MagellaCl.html   (334 words)

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