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Topic: Magic and religion


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In the News (Fri 25 May 18)

  
  Anthropology of Religion:  Magic and Religion
Magic practiced in secret by someone who wants to harm you is the answer.
which is a magical procedure by which the cause of a particular event or the future is determined.
In societies in which magic and witchcraft are accepted as realities, mental illness is usually explained as being a consequence of witchcraft or the actions of supernatural beings and forces.
anthro.palomar.edu /religion/rel_5.htm   (753 words)

  
  The Golden Bough/Magic and Religion - Wikisource
In some cases of magic which have come before us we have seen that the operation of spirits is assumed, and that an attempt is made to win their favour by prayer and sacrifice.
Yet though magic is thus found to fuse and amalgamate with religion in many ages and in many lands, there are some grounds for thinking that this fusion is not primitive, and that there was a time when man trusted to magic alone for the satisfaction of such wants as transcended his immediate animal cravings.
If an Age of Religion has thus everywhere, as I venture to surmise, been preceded by an Age of Magic, it is natural that we should enquire what causes have led mankind, or rather a portion of them, to abandon magic as a principle of faith and practice and to betake themselves to religion instead.
en.wikisource.org /wiki/The_Golden_Bough/Magic_and_Religion   (0 words)

  
  Chapter 4. Magic and Religion. Frazer, Sir James George. 1922. The Golden Bough
In some cases of magic which have come before us we have seen that the operation of spirits is assumed, and that an attempt is made to win their favour by prayer and sacrifice.
By religion, then, I understand a propitiation or conciliation of powers superior to man which are believed to direct and control the course of nature and of human life.
Yet though magic is thus found to fuse and amalgamate with religion in many ages and in many lands, there are some grounds for thinking that this fusion is not primitive, and that there was a time when man trusted to magic alone for the satisfaction of such wants as transcended his immediate animal cravings.
www.bartleby.com /196/9.html   (3906 words)

  
 sociology - Magic (paranormal)
The conceptual relationship between religion and magic is similar to the relationship "religion" and paganism, wheras "religion" refers to a system of established beliefs, and "magic" and "pagan" are terms used within these religions to refer to extracultural beliefs and customs, or particular aspects of those beliefs which are conflicting.
Examples of the suppression of magical belief and practice range from the eradication of neighboring polytheistic tribes by the early Hebrews, to the attempted suppression and eventual appropriation of pagan holidays by the Catholic Church, to the mingled motives of the Conquistadors, to the Salem witch trials of the Puritans.
Magic has been portrayed in numerous games, in which magic is a characteristic available to players in certain circumstances or to certain types of player characters.
www.aboutsociology.com /sociology/Magic   (4232 words)

  
 Magic And Religion
But as his magic fails him, as he finds that he is not the cause of the phenomena of nature, of the storms, of the sunshine, of the fulness of the harvest, he begins to attribute the power, which he once supposed he possessed, to these supernatural beings.
Magic and religion are each, according to Frazer, diverse schemes devised by the primitive man for the manipulation of his world to his advantage.
Magic would thus be readily associated with the private individual, and in tribes in which the power of custom was strong, this particular aspect of magic, which, as we have reason to believe, is the larger aspect of it, would be outlawed.
www.oldandsold.com /articles27n/religion-development-7.shtml   (9482 words)

  
 magic, in religion and superstition. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Magic is based upon the belief that the universe is populated by unseen forces or spirits that permeate all things.
The practice of magic is held to depend on the proper use of both the ritual and the spell.
White magic is characterized by those rites and spells designed to produce beneficial effects for the community (see fertility rites) or for the individual, particularly in those cases where an illness is considered to be the result of evil demons or of fl magic.
www.bartleby.com /65/ma/magic.html   (480 words)

  
 Religion, Magic, and Laws
Magic is still somewhat of a mystery to Arcadians despite the passage of time, although the scientists and mages of Aurun are making advances in understanding it.
Arcane magic is not viewed as powered directly by the Brothers, so those born with the ability to control it are not viewed as blessed, unlike those born with divine magic.
Alchemy is a science related to magic that was perfected by the gnomes and passed on to the humans and elves.
mysite.verizon.net /vzeehuhf/arcadianwn/magic.html   (1749 words)

  
 Magic (paranormal) at AllExperts
These magical forces are said to exist in addition to and alongside the four fundamental forces of nature: gravity, electromagnetism, the strong nuclear force and the weak nuclear force.
Manifest and Subtle magic typically refers to magic of legend rather than what many individuals who practise the Occult claim to use as magic, where Manifest magic is magic that immediately appears with a result, and Subtle magic being magic that gradually and intangibly alters the world.
When dealing with magic in terms of "traditions," it is a common misconception for ousiders to treat any religion in which clergy members make amulets and talismans for their congregants as a "tradition of magic," even though what is being named is actually an organized religion with clergy, laity, and an order of liturgical service.
en.allexperts.com /e/m/ma/magic_(paranormal).htm   (4886 words)

  
 [MAGIC/RELIGION]
Magic was a means for achieving ends that its practitioners felt could not be reached with certainty through ordinary prayers and rituals, but like traditional cults it too relied on achieving a close working relationship with supernatural powers.
Despite the dizzying variety of spells and practices, the fundamental principle of most magic was the desire to gain control over a divinity and, having enslaved it, compel it to serve the practitioner.
This attempt to distinguish between "magic" and "religion" based on the practitioner’s mindset, however, is admittedly flawed, since it applies more to aggressive magic than the much more prevalent forms of benevolent, or "white," magic.
www.georgetown.edu /faculty/jod/apuleius/renberg/MAGIC_RELIGION.HTML   (622 words)

  
 magic
Magical power appears to them to be determined by the contiguity, simi­larity and contrast of the object of the act, and the object to be effected.
Frazer believes all magic to be based on the law of sympathy, that is the assumption that things act on one another at a distance because of their being secretly.
Contagious magic may be instanced by the savage anointing the weapon, which caused a wound instead of the wound itself, in the belief that the blood on the weapon continues to feel with the blood on the body.
www.florid.org /magic.htm   (1209 words)

  
 Magic - Wikinfo
Magic (paranormal) deals with the manipulation of what the practitioner believes to be genuine paranormal phenomena.
Magic and religion deals with the relationship of paranormal magic and religion.
Magic (illusion) deals with the use of illusions and tricks to give the appearance of magical phenomena, with intent to amuse.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Magic   (637 words)

  
 Magic and religion
A belief in magic as a means of influencing the supernatural or natural seems to have been universal to all cultures and all religions prior to the advent of monotheism, and there is significant historical evidence that magic was part of early Judaism and Christianity.
In line with this viewpoint, magic in the context of religion is often conflated with magic in the context of the paranormal.
Contagious magic involves the use of physical ingredients which were once in contact with the object or objects one hopes to influence with a spell, and sympathetic magic involves the use of physical objects which resemble the object or objects one hopes to influence.
www.mandrake-press.co.uk /Main_article/magic_and_religion.html   (903 words)

  
 Magic and Religion - WiccanWeb.ca
A belief in magic as a means of influencing the supernatural or natural seems to have been universal to all cultures and all religions prior to the advent of monotheism, and there is significant historical evidence that magic was part of early Judaism and Christianity.
In line with this viewpoint, magic in the context of religion is often conflated with magic in the context of the paranormal.
Religious based magic involves the use of faith by requesting the intervention of major or minor deities to enact spells or weaves, and nature based magic involves modifying the world according to the desires of the spellcaster.
www.wiccanweb.ca /wiki/index.php/Magic_and_religion   (1040 words)

  
 On Magic - Thoughts From The Rim
Magic is the blooming of a flower, the growing of a weed.
Magic is everywhere but most of us are too distracted to recognize it; too busy to appreciate it.
Magic and miracle are the same thing but some religions have tried to evilize magic while glorifying miracles.
www.rimthoughts.com /articles2002/onmagic.html   (358 words)

  
 Carnelian Coast (Magic)
The quantity of work is called magical power, and is determined by the complexity of the spell being cast, the range to the target, and the target's magic resistance.
In places where magical energy flows easily through the Ether there is said to be high magical flux, and in places where magical flow is restricted, there is said to be low magical flux.
There are two basic factors that flavor the actual practical use of magic: the degree to which the magician depends on external aid, and the traditions that define preferences for the various elements of magic.
ccoast.home.comcast.net /System/magic.html   (6190 words)

  
 Religion and Magic
Magic and religion have gone hand-in-hand for centuries.
It is impossible to create a distinct line between magic and religion, because they both have relatively the same concept.
Magically, it was believed to be made by Merlyn, but religiously, it was known as a site for Druidic rituals.
library.thinkquest.org /26485/religion_and_magic.htm   (259 words)

  
 Black Magic: Religion and the African-American Conjuring Tradition Folklore - Find Articles   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Magic and religion are closely interwoven in African-American cultural traditions.
It was this intermixing that reinforced the convergence of "magic" and "religion" in ways that were cumulative, creatively renewed, and adaptable to situation-specific actions, events, and processes.
Harming magic could be directed to individual whites, but just as significantly acted as a means of expressing hostility and aggression within fl communities, being employed "to punish criminals and wrongdoers; to attack opponents; to combat evil forces; and to retaliate against enemies and perceived adversaries" (p.
findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m2386/is_2_116/ai_n15384194   (905 words)

  
 SikhSpectrum.com Monthly. Sirdar Kapur Singh: Magic and Religion
It is an integral part of the practices of the Vedic-cum-tantric religion, the latter being essentially magic and not religion proper.
Magic is not prior, chronologically to religion, nor an earlier stage in the evolutionary scale as assumed by Hegel or supposed by Frazer in his famous book Golden Bough.
The doctrine of (upaya) in magic leads to the existence of esoteric body of knowledge, guhyamusht (the closed fist secrets), and the necessity of sianap leads to the existence of priests of religion who are equivalents of medicine men of voodoo.
www.sikhspectrum.com /072002/sukhmani.htm   (424 words)

  
 Magic, Science, Religion, and Spirituality
Most of the rituals of magic seem to be for the purpose of heightening the emotional state of the practitioners, on the assumption that in a heightened emotional state they will be able to impose their will upon elemental forces.
To him religion is humankind's discovery of the limitations of its magical powers and the appeal to higher beings such as demons, ancestor-spirits or gods.
Since the terms "magic," "science," and "religion" are currently being used primarily as means for invidious distinctions by sectarians of various stripes, it's necessary to reserve a word which can refer to this other approach to knowledge.
www.hermes-press.com /magic.htm   (1975 words)

  
 Team Atlantis - Research Papers
Magic is almost never associated with domestic activities, no matter their importance to social maintenance.
The employment of the magic act is nearly as predetermined as the scientific prediction.
According to Malinowski (1931: 110), "the place of religion must be considered in the scheme of culture as a complex satisfaction of highly derived needs." That is to say, the main source for the development of religion is the foreknowledge of death and the need to explain as well as justify it in acceptable terms.
www.teamatlantis.com /yucatan_test/research_magic_religion.html   (1656 words)

  
 Golden Bough Chapter 4. Magic and Religion.
Wherever sympathetic magic occurs in its pure unadulterated form, it assumes that in nature one event follows another necessarily and invariably without the intervention of any spiritual or personal agency.
If an Age of Religion has thus everywhere, as I venture to surmise, been preceded by an Age of Magic, it is natural that we should enquire what causes have led mankind, or rather a portion of them, to abandon magic as a principle of faith and practice and to betake themselves to religion instead.
For he could no longer cherish the pleasing illusion that it was he who guided the earth and the heaven in their courses, and that they would cease to perform their great revolutions were he to take his feeble hand from the wheel.
www.btinternet.com /~tony.singleton/frazer/gb00400.htm   (3754 words)

  
 Magic and Religion Revisited
Magic as sorcery in the New Testament is associated with fornication, impurity, licentiousness, idolatry, strife, anger, envy and drunkenness.
In votive religion, or the "practice of making vows" people in some kind of distress or fear or, who are experiencing sudden affluence, make a promise to a deity and fulfill these promises by some sort of donation to the deity.
By associating women with "magic" through their participation in mystery cults, as argued earlier, the idea that capable, intelligent women would be irresponsible with spiritual power and thus use this power to control men as expressed in literature is made plausible.
www.sonoma.edu /users/h/holmstrl/DIVINATION.html   (0 words)

  
 MoonLily: Magic, Science, Religion and Art
Of course, until the last few centuries everything has been connected to religion and spiritual beliefs—it’s just that magic has never really separated, at least not in the minds of most people, who tend to think of both magic and religion as dealing with non-material (some would say non-real) aspects of the world.
However, in some ways, magic is more akin to science, or perhaps to technology; for magic, like technology, tries to use knowledge of the way the world works to manipulate it.
Religion and spirituality, on the other hand, have to do with worshiping or honoring a god or gods or goddesses.
www.moonlily.com /magic/articles/magicscience.html   (703 words)

  
 Class Notes 2 for Feb. 3rd Magic Seminar
The reading suggests that modern religion rejects magic as bad - disagree and agree (superstitions still exist but are sometimes looked down upon as silly/trivial).
Modern religions such as Christianity contain religious rituals similar to magic - some even with the intention to bring harm to others (ex: praying before battle, praying for the sick, and praying for safety - similar to praying to Ceres for a good harvest).
Magic is what a person who claims religion as his own perceives as the other.
www.tulane.edu /~spaeth/magic/notes/notes.feb3/notes.Feb3.2.html   (693 words)

  
 ORB: Magic Preliminary Discussion
Despite their similarity to modern notions of magic, these are more examples of popular religion than anything else and their purpose is often to thwart demonic magic with Christian miracle, as evident in Saint Benedict's life and miracles.
Thus, many practices that might seem, in a later age, to be magical in the sense of unscientific or unChristian were part of medieval medicine and liturgy, as practiced by male or female lay healers, physicians, barber-surgeons, as well as some monks, nuns, and priests.
Magic is not therefore, a marginalized phenomenon in medieval society but is connected to a variety of aspects of medieval life and bears close study for what it reveals about the people of the Middle Ages.
www.the-orb.net /encyclop/culture/magwitch/orbmagic.htm   (1028 words)

  
 Golden Bough Chapter 4. Magic and Religion.
Wherever sympathetic magic occurs in its pure unadulterated form, it assumes that in nature one event follows another necessarily and invariably without the intervention of any spiritual or personal agency.
If an Age of Religion has thus everywhere, as I venture to surmise, been preceded by an Age of Magic, it is natural that we should enquire what causes have led mankind, or rather a portion of them, to abandon magic as a principle of faith and practice and to betake themselves to religion instead.
For he could no longer cherish the pleasing illusion that it was he who guided the earth and the heaven in their courses, and that they would cease to perform their great revolutions were he to take his feeble hand from the wheel.
www.sacred-texts.com /pag/frazer/gb00400.htm   (3754 words)

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