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Topic: Malayo Polynesian


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In the News (Thu 23 May 19)

  
  MALAYO-POLYNESIAN LANGUAGES,
Most of the approximately two dozen Polynesian languages are spoken within a large triangle bounded by Easter Island on the east, Hawaii on the north, and New Zealand on the south.
The nine Micronesian languages are spoken in islands scattered north of Melanesia, between the Philippines and Polynesia.
It is now generally believed that the Malayo-Polynesian languages originated somewhere in Indonesia or New Guinea, were carried westward and eastward, and had spread throughout Oceania between 3000 and 2000 years ago.
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=215578   (824 words)

  
 Polynesian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Polynesian languages are a group of related languages spoken in the region known as Polynesia.
Because the Polynesian islands were settled relatively recently (starting around 2,000 years ago), their languages retain strong commonalities.
Although none of the modern Polynesian languages allow consonant clusters, this tendency appears to be have developed well after the early settlement of the islands.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Polynesian_languages   (326 words)

  
 Malayo-Polynesian languages - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Eastern Malayo-Polynesian has two subgroups: Polynesian and Micronesian.
Micronesian includes the languages spoken by the native peoples of Micronesia such as Nauruan, Sama and Chamorro.
Polynesian languages include Hawai'ian, Maori, Samoan, Tahitian, Tongan and Tuvaluan.
www.open-encyclopedia.com /Western_Malayo-Polynesian_languages   (221 words)

  
 Resources on the Polynesian
The early Polynesians were skillful navigators, capable, by careful observations of cloud reflections and bird flight patterns, to determine the existence and location of islands.
While the early Polynesians were skilled navigators, most evidence indicates that their primary exploratory motivation was to ease the demands of burgeoning populations.
Polynesian mythology does not speak of explorers bent on conquest of new territories, but rather of heroic discoverers of new lands for the benefit of those who voyaged with them.
www.mongabay.com /indigenous_ethnicities/pacific/Polynesian.html   (2114 words)

  
 Malayo-Polynesian languages. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
), family of languages estimated at from 300 to 500 tongues and understood by approximately 300 million people in Madagascar; the Malay Peninsula; Indonesia and New Guinea; the Philippines; Taiwan; the Melanesian, Micronesian, and Polynesian islands; and New Zealand.
Today four Malayo-Polynesian languages have official status in four important states: Malagasy, in Madagascar; Malay, in Malaysia; Indonesian (also called Bahasa Indonesia, and based on Malay), in Indonesia; and Pilipino (based on Tagalog), in the Philippines.
The Eastern branch consists of the Melanesian, Micronesian, and Polynesian groups of languages.
www.bartleby.com /65/ma/MalayoPo.html   (417 words)

  
 Malayo-Polynesian languages on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Today four Malayo-Polynesian languages have official status in four important states: Malagasy, in Madagascar; Malay, in Malaysia; Indonesian (also called Bahasa Indonesia, and based on Malay), in Indonesia; and Pilipino (based on Tagalog), in the Philippines.
The Western subfamily has the greater significance from both a cultural and a commercial viewpoint.
The Eastern branch consists of the Melanesian, Micronesian, and Polynesian groups of languages.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/M/MalayoP1o.asp   (537 words)

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