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Topic: Manetho


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Manetho - LoveToKnow 1911
MANETHO (Ma 40ow in an inscription of Carthage; MavcOeos in a papyrus), Egyptian priest and annalist, was a native of Sebennytus in the Delta.
Manetho's work was probably based on native lists like that of the Turin Papyrus of Kings: even his division into dynasties may have been derived from such.
The brief notes attached to some of the names may be derived from Manetho's narrative, but they are chiefly references to kings mentioned by Herodotus or to marvels that were supposed to have occurred: they certainly possess little historical value.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Manetho   (470 words)

  
 The Ancient Egypt Site - Manetho, Egypt's Most Famous Historian
Manetho lived in Sebennytos, the capital of Egypt during the 30th Dynasty, and was a priest during the reigns of Ptolemy I and Ptolemy II.
Manetho owes his importance to the fact that he wrote the Aegyptiaca, a collection of three books about the history of Ancient Egypt, commissioned by Ptolemy II in his effort to bring together the Egyptian and Hellenistic cultures.
It is to Manetho's Aegyptiaca that we owe the division of Ancient Egyptian history in 30 dynasties.
www.ancient-egypt.org /glossary/people/manetho.html   (797 words)

  
  Manetho - Crystalinks
The problems with a close study of Manetho, despite the reliance of Egyptologists on him for their reconstructions of the Egyptian dynasties, is that not only was Aegyptiaca not preserved as a whole, but that it became involved in a bitter battle between Jewish and anti-Jewish polemicists.
It is speculated that Manetho wrote at the request of Ptolemy I or II to give an account of the history of Egypt to the Greeks from a native's perspective.
Manetho should not be judged on the factuality of his account, but on the approach he took to recording history, and in this, he was as successful as Herodotus and Hesiod.
www.crystalinks.com /manetho.html   (3243 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Manetho
Manetho, also known as Manethon of Sebennytos, was an Egyptian historian and priest from Sebennytos (ancient Egyptian: Tjebnutjer) who lived during the Ptolemaic era, circa 3rd century BC.
Because Manetho's transcriptions agree with many king-lists, it is generally accepted that he was reliant on one or more such lists, and it is not clear to what extent he was aware of the different pharaonic names of rulers long past (and he had alternate names for some).
Manetho should not be judged on the factuality of his account, but on the approach he took to recording history, and in this, he was as successful as Herodotus and Hesiod.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Manetho   (3453 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Manetho, also known as Manethon of Sebennytos, was an Egyptian historian and priest from Sebennytos (ancient Egyptian: Tjebnutjer) who lived during the Ptolemaic era, circa 3rd century BC.
Because Manetho's transcriptions agree with many king-lists, it is generally accepted that he was reliant on one or more such lists, and it is not clear to what extent he was aware of the different pharaonic names of rulers long past (and he had alternate names for some).
Manetho should not be judged on the factuality of his account, but on the approach he took to recording history, and in this, he was as successful as Herodotus and Hesiod.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Manetho   (3199 words)

  
 Manetho   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Manetho [Manethos and Manethon] is called the Father of Egyptian History, though only fragments of his writing survive.
Manetho was greatly responsible for the introduction of the cult of Serapis.
Manetho divided Egyptian history into dynasties which were essentially ruling houses, of which 30 are recognized and used today, dating from unification around 3100 BCE up until the death of the last native Egyptian ruler Nectanebo II in 343 BCE.
www.lebtahor.com /chronology/manetho.htm   (503 words)

  
 Manetho's Eighteenth Dynasty
Both sources are based on the king-list summaries extracted from Manetho’s text, with the kings and/or dynasties listed in tabular format along with lengths of reign for many of the kings and dynasties, with the dynasties appearing in numbered order.
Manetho’s Eighteenth Dynasty in Josephus, Africanus and Eusebius
I suspect that in the original Manetho narratives, Manetho described events during a portion of the reign of Mephres that lasted about 3 years and 4 months and that a redactor misread that name and thought it applied to the next king in sequence, Mephramuthosis, and added those years to his reign.
ggreenberg.tripod.com /ancientne/manetho1.html   (3264 words)

  
 Manetho
Manetho was a priest, working for Ptolemy 1.
It has been suggested that he worked to establish the cult of Serapis, which would serve as an amalgamation of the Greek religion of Ptolemy and the Egyptian religion of his new subjects, thereby legitimizing the foreign dynasty.
Manetho wrote in Greek, but he could read Egyptian.
www.lexicorient.com /e.o/manetho.htm   (182 words)

  
 Manetho - Encyclopedia.com
Manetho's arrangement of 30 dynasties, in spite of limitations—some dynastic changes are not recorded; some dynasties continued through two or three of Manetho's—has proved to be a convenient device and is still in use.
Egyptian known to have written in Greek, Manetho authored a dynastic record of the pharoahs...
Did authors like Manetho and Berossus not advance their national cultures while writing in Greek in the Hellenistic era, encouraged by the climate of...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Manetho.html   (916 words)

  
 The Giza Pyramids - Ancient Egyptian Dates
As Manetho had access to the ancient annals, he added some of their entries to his list of kings and reigns, especially during the first dynasties.
Further, Manetho wrote in Greek and used the Pharaoh's secular name, whereas other sources were written in Egyptian and used their religious names.
Nevertheless, Manetho's work taken together with the king's lists carved in stone at Abydos, Saqqara and Karnak, fragments of the annals like the Palmero Stone and the king list of Turin, have enabled a framework of Egyptian chronology to be created.
members.ozemail.com.au /~googong/giza2.html   (586 words)

  
 Manetho Summary
Manetho was the source for the division of Egyptian history into 30 dynastic periods, a system still used by Egyptologists today.
Manetho, also known as Manethon of Sebennytos, was an Egyptian historian and priest from Sebennytos (ancient Egyptian: Tjebnutjer) who lived during the Ptolematic era, circa 3rd century BC.
Manetho consistently includes the Tanite Dynasty 21 and Dynasty 22 line in his Epitome such as Psusennes I, Amenemopet and even such short-lived rulers here like Amenemnisu(5 years) and Osochor(6 years).
www.bookrags.com /Manetho   (3535 words)

  
 Manetho and the King Lists
Manetho was a Greco-Egyptian priest born at Sebennytos in the Nile Delta, and lived during the reign of
Manetho divided Egyptian history into dynasties which were essentially ruling houses, of which 30 are recognised and used today.
Manetho's history is known to us because several writers whose works have survived have quoted extensively from it.
www.egyptologyonline.com /manetho.htm   (720 words)

  
 Egypt: Aha! Or is it King Menes?, A Feature Tour Egypt Story
Manetho and Herodotus are the "best" historical sources for the tradition that Menes was the unifier and first King of a unified Egypt.
Manetho lived in Sebennytos in the Delta during the Ptolemaic period.
Manetho wrote this about King Menes: "After the dead and the demigods comes the 1st Dynasty, with 8 kings of whom Menes was the first.
www.touregypt.net /featurestories/menes.htm   (1224 words)

  
 RamesesMapAvaris
Manetho said the expulsion of the diseased scabby lepers was from an earlier abandoned CITY called Avaris, _not_ Zoan Djanet/Tanis and its nearby fields.
Manetho had stated that Ramesside Egyptian "lepers" were settled at Memphis in a nearby quarry before being allowed to later settle at the abandoned Avaris.
Manetho understood that the Hebrew Exodus was a reformatting of a Ramesside expulsion of the Hyksos' descendants who had resettled in Avaris in Ramesside times.
www.homestead.com /bibleorigins*net/RamesesMapAvaris.html   (8807 words)

  
 Ancient Egypt - Manetho and the modern chronology
Manetho's account provides estimates of the lengths of reigns, and he also includes popular stories about the rulers, obviously drawing on informal information that came to his attention, as well as the official records.
His work was based first on deciphering the names of various Egyptian rulers, and subsequently, on using Manetho's list of kings to clarify the position of each of these kings within the chronological sequence; then, he was able to confirm that his identification of the ruler was correct.
Even the evidence provided by Manetho's history, the various king lists, and the many other extant inscriptions, which give the names and dates of kings, is insufficient to establish an accurate chronology of ancient Egypt.
ancient-egypt.co.uk /people/pages/manetho.htm   (2498 words)

  
 Manetho
Manetho is an important source to knowledge about Ancient Egypt.
Manetho was a priest, working for Ptolemy 1.
It has been suggested that he worked to establish the cult of Serapis, which would serve as an amalgamation of the Greek religion of Ptolemy and the Egyptian religion of his new subjects, thereby legitimizing the foreign dynasty.
i-cias.com /e.o/manetho.htm   (182 words)

  
 ExodusJosephusVSManetho
Manetho's body of water is the Pelusiasic Nile and its canals feeding the Harbor and fields versus the Bible's Yam Suph and God performing a miracle, opening a way through the sea for his people to pass through, then destroying the pursuing Egyptian army with returning waters.
Nothing has survived in official annals (papyri and stone monuments), only Manetho's account of Amenophis and son Ramesses expelling lepers from Avaris by Pi-Ramesses and Egypt, who were plundering her, and the Exodus story of lepers in the wilderness with Egyptian gold (Ex 12:35-36), being expelled from the Israelite camp by Moses (Nu 5:2).
Manetho tells us that Sethos/Ramesses at the age of 18 accompanied his father Amenophis in expelling the inhabitants of Avaris who fled to Jerusalem, after having earlier plundered the land and its temples for 13 years.
www.homestead.com /bibleorigins*net/ExodusJosephusVSManetho.html   (7986 words)

  
 Manetho home page
The Manetho project started at Rice University in 1989 as a prototype system to investigate the issues of providing reliability in network multicomputers.
The Manetho system addresses the problem of providing low-overhead fault tolerance in distributed systems, with emphasis on high performance during failure-free operation.
Manetho has been implemented on an Ethernet network that connects 16~workstations running the V system.
www.cs.cmu.edu /afs/cs.cmu.edu/user/mootaz/ftp/html/manetho.html   (805 words)

  
 Manetho
Manetho was a Graeco-Egyptian priest in the Temple of Heliopolis.
He was born in Sebennytos (in the Delta) during the Third Centuary A.D. His "Egyptian History" divided the rulers into dynasties, or ruling houses and formed the basis of the modern system of dating Ancient Egypt.
No full copies of Manetho's text remain, we only have short sections of text and a few references in the writings of Josephus Flavius (first century A.D), Sextus Julius Africanus (third century B.C), Eusebius of Cesarea (third/fourth century B.C) and George Syncellos (a Byzantine historian from the eighth century A.D).
www.ancientegyptonline.co.uk /manetho.html   (261 words)

  
 Manetho - Definition, explanation
Manetho (circa 3rd century BC), alternatively known as Manethon of Sebennytos, was a Hellenistic Egyptian historian and priest of Serapis in Heliopolis during the reigns of Ptolemy I and Ptolemy II.
By the time of Josephus, it was widely believed that the Hyksos, who ruled Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period, were the same as the Hebrews who were believed to have lived for several generations in Egypt.
Because Manetho and some of his followers, such as Apion, voiced the hostility their countrymen felt towards the Hyksos, Josephus believed they were espousing anti-Semitic views, and wrote his pamphlet Against Apion to combat them.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/m/ma/manetho.php   (557 words)

  
 Problems with Manetho's "Reign of the Gods"
If we accept the oldest fragments that we have of Manetho--that of Josephus--it appears that Manetho's original work was composed in narrative style.
It appears that the "Manetho Model" available to Eusebius and Africanus called for eight kings in each dynasty; but having only seven names of god-kings available to them, they created a gap.
So the tradition carried down that Horus was the last of the god-kings remains intact; but the appearance of two separate kings in the list, both named "Horus," evidently triggered a simple scribal error (known as haplographic error), which lead in turn to subsequent errors in copying Manetho's original king-list.
www.atlantisquest.com /Manetho.html   (802 words)

  
 Manetho - Egyptian Chronology
Much of Egyptian Chronology is based on Manetho's list of the Dynasties of Kings, but this too only second-hand, primarily through Julius Africanus and Eusebius.
Indeed, Manetho may be a description of the subject [Latvian MAINITU "changes"] rather than an author at all.
The Dynasties 1 through 6 add up according to Manetho on the one hand to 1480 years and on the other hand to 1497 years, so that these sums surely represented Sothic year-days of 1460 days viz.
www.lexiline.com /lexiline/lexi20.htm   (652 words)

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