Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Manx Gaelic


Related Topics

In the News (Wed 26 Jun 19)

  
  Goidelic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Although Irish and Manx are often referred to as Irish Gaelic and Manx Gaelic — and it is correct to describe them as Goidelic or Gaelic languages — this is unnecessary because the words Irish and Manx only ever refer to these languages whereas Scots by itself refers to the Germanic language.
Manx, the former common language of the Isle of Man, is descended from the Gaelic spoken in north east Ireland and the now extinct Gaelic of Galloway (in southwest Scotland), with heavy influence from Old Norse because of the Viking invasions.
Manx is virtually extinct, although attempts to revive it continue and it is still used in ceremonies such as Tynwald Day.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gaelic_language   (1235 words)

  
 Manx language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Manx (Gaelg or Gailck), also known as Manx Gaelic, is a Goidelic language spoken on the Isle of Man.
The spelling of Manx, unlike that of Irish and Scottish Gaelic, does not represent the Goidelic etymology, and more closely resembles an English speaker's attempt to write Gaelic, with a degree of Welsh influence evident from the use of 'y' and 'w'.
This is because Manx developed without a written literature, and when attempts were made to introduce a standardised orthography for the language, the choice was made to spell the words in an English manner.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Manx_language   (787 words)

  
 Manx language, alphabet and pronunciation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Manx began to emerge as a distinct language in the 13th-14th century after the collapse of the Norse kingdom of Mann and the Isles and prior to the long settled period of English control through the Stanleys.
Manx was once spoken by almost the entire population of the Isle of Man until the 1765 Revestment Act by which the Duke of Atholl sold the island to the British Crown.
The decline of Manx was further accelerated by immigration from North West England during the later 18th and early 19th centuries, and the large numbers of English-speaking tourists who start to visit the island from the 1830s onwards.
www.omniglot.com /writing/manx.htm   (684 words)

  
 Gormglaith - help - Glossary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Manx Gaelic ben shee is alike with this Gaelic/Irish word meaning girl faerie, rune of an ancient helper linked with earth and stone, also known to wail upon an impending death of kin.
Manx Gaelic, rare, singular, for the first braid of a tide (Geileis is neuchadjin, Gormglaith is twin).
From Gaelic for schoolgirls and scollag for scholar, with scollaghan, for nestling.
www.literateweb.com /wyss/wyss00g.htm   (1989 words)

  
 Manx Gaelic (Part 5, The Celtic Languages)
Manx is the historical language of the Isle of Man, the small, autonomous island in the center of the Irish Sea.
Manx was still the dominant language until early in the 19th century, when English began to take precedence (1).
Consequently, the effects of the decline of Manx during the 19th century was made even worse by significant immigration English-only speakers to the island during the middle of the 20th century, so that by 1981 just over 50% of the population was “native” Manx (3).
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/celtic_internet_resources/87874   (451 words)

  
 Scottish Gaelic language, alphabet and pronunciation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Scottish Gaelic is closely related to Manx and Irish and was brought to Scotland around the 4th century AD by the Scots from Ireland.
Scottish Gaelic was spoken throughout Scotland (apart from small areas in the extreme south-east and north-east) between the 9th and 11th centuries, but began to retreat north and westwards from the 11th century onwards.
The earliest identifiably texts in Scottish Gaelic are notes in the Book of Deer written in north eastern Scotland in the 12th century, although the existence of a common written Classical Gaelic concealed the extent of the divergence between Scottish and Irish Gaelic.
www.omniglot.com /writing/gaelic.htm   (570 words)

  
 Manx language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Manx (Gaelg), also known as Manx Gaelic, is an extant Goidelic language spoken on the Isle of Man.
Manx dates to around the 5th century AD and is called Gaelg Vanninagh by Manx speakers.
The spelling of Manx, unlike those of Irish and Scottish Gaelic, does not represent the Goidelic phonology, and more closely resembles an English-speaker's attempt to write Gaelic.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/m/ma/manx_language.html   (245 words)

  
 Gaelic / Goidelic - Language Directory   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
It is also known as Gaelic, or Q-Celtic because of the way that words in Brythonic that begin with "B" or "P" begin with "C" or "K" in Gaelic languages.
Manx, the former common language of the Isle of Man, is descended from the Gaelic spoken in north east Ireland and the now extinct Gaelic of Galloway (Scotland), with heavy influence from Old Norse because of the Viking invasions.
Irish Gaelic, (known as 'Irish', formerly 'Erse'), is one of Ireland's two official languages and is still fairly widely spoken in the west of Ireland.
www.geocities.com /language_directory/languages/gaelic.htm   (361 words)

  
 Collected Precedents of the S.C.A.: Gaelic (Irish, Manx, Scottish)
As nic is the Anglicized form of the Gaelic inghean mhic 'daughter of a son of'/'daughter of the Mac- family', it is clear of inghean uí 'daughter of a grandson of'/'daughter of the Ó- family' according to this precedent.
While elements from Gaelic and Norse may have been used in a single name, the name itself would be written either entirely in Gaelic or Norse, although the same name could have been written in either language depending on the context.
Lacking evidence either for a pattern of similar period Gaelic diminutives or for a period English form of which it could be a Gaelic spelling, we are unwilling to assume that it is a legitimate period form.
www.sca.org /heraldry/laurel/precedents/CompiledNamePrecedents/Gaelic.html   (16535 words)

  
 [No title]
Manx is one of six Celtic languages, the others being Irish, Scots Gaelic, Welsh, Breton and Cornish.
Up until the 1800s English, although it would be used for trade and administration purposes, was a foreign language to most Manx people.  However, due to economic, social and political pressures, the language suffered an enormous decline, to such an extent that by 1961 only 165 people claimed to speak the language.
The Manx Gaelic School, or Bunscoill Ghaelgagh in Manx, is a primary school where the children learn every subject through Manx Gaelic.
www.isleofman.com /locallife/features/manx_language.asp   (810 words)

  
 Celtic Languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Irish, or Irish Gaelic, is the oldest of the Goidelic Celtic languages.
Scottish Gaelic was brought to the Scots by Irish invaders in the 5th century.
Manx, the language of the Isle of Man, is classified as a dialect of Scottish Gaelic with strong Norse influences.
www.fortunecity.com /bally/guinness/207/celticlang.html   (312 words)

  
 Manx language
Manx (Gaelg), also known as Manx Gaelic, is the Goidelic language spoken on the Isle of Man.
The spelling of Manx, unlike those of Irish and Scots Gaelic, doesn't represent the Goidelic phonology, and more closely resembles an English-speaker's attempt to write Gaelic.
Both of the other Gaelics, for instance, would write Mhainnineagh (sp?) indicating that the initial 'v' sound is a lenited 'm', to distinguish it from a 'v' sound that is a lenited 'b' and is written bh in the other Gaelics, but also v in Manx.
www.fastload.org /ma/Manx_language.html   (186 words)

  
 Manx language --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Like Scottish Gaelic, Manx was an offshoot of Irish, and it is closely related to the easternmost dialects of Irish and to Scottish.
The earliest record of the Manx language is a version of the Anglican Book of Common Prayer, translated into Manx in 1610 by a Welsh...
The Manx, or original inhabitants of the Isle of Man, are struggling to preserve their language and culture.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9050670?tocId=9050670   (765 words)

  
 Scotland: Gaelic Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Gaelic Language is spoken by around 86,000 individuals primarily in the North of Scotland and in the Western Isles (eg.
Gaelic (or Scottish Gaelic as it is sometimes known outside Scotland) has similarities to the other Celtic languages, and is particulary close to Irish (or Irish Gaelic) to the extent that a mutual understanding is possible.
Another variant of Gaelic is spoken in the Isle of Man (a small tax haven between England and Ireland) called Manx Gaelic.
www.geo.ed.ac.uk /home/scotland/gaelic.html   (230 words)

  
 Untitled
Irish, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx are regarded as the three Goidelic languages, although due to a lack of evidence for Manx before the sixteenth century, it cannot be said with absolute certainty from which branch Manx originated (1, p.
Scottish Gaelic and Manx were not as yet particularly distinctive therefore any words present in their vocabulary derived from Latin date back to their common ancestor Old Irish.
Scottish Gaelic and Manx divergence from Old Irish cannot be readily detected until the arrival of the Vikings in the eighth century.
www.suite101.com /print_article.cfm/10964/98104   (1638 words)

  
 [No title]
With the exception of the Stanley stronghold in Castletown, Manx Gaelic was universally spoken in Man until the 1765 Revestment Act by which the Duke of Atholl sold the Isle of Man to the British Crown.
The programme is being used by the Manx Heritage Foundation as a basis for its support of the Manx Gaelic language and the approval of the programme has led to the establishment of Bing ny Gaelgey an inter departmental language development committee involving the Department of Education, Manx Heritage Foundation and Manx National Heritage.
As traditional Manxness is perceived to be further eroded and the proportion of Manx born residents on the Isle of Man continues to decline, this role of the Manx Gaelic language, in providing a new, all inclusive, Manx identity, looks set to expand for many years to come.
www.arts.ed.ac.uk /celtic/poileasaidh/gawneseminar.html   (5195 words)

  
 Manx - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Manx palm, a palm tree that can be found in the Isle of Man
Manx cattle and Manx horses, now extinct animals once found on the Isle of Man
This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Manx   (109 words)

  
 Mec Vannin's submission to Department of Education regarding the Manx Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
It would also publicise Manx as a living language both in Mann and further afield and it would provide at least some support to those children who are struggling to speak Manx in an English speaking world.
Ideally, a full-time Manx pre-school teacher should be appointed to encourage parents to bring their children to Manx playgroups, and to set up and provide materials for such groups.
This language co-ordinator would be primarily required to raise the profile of Manx Gaelic both in Mann and abroad, and to encourage the greater use of Manx in all spheres of Manx life.
www.manxman.co.im /mecvan/archive/gaelg.html   (1773 words)

  
 D27: Create Semantic Lexicon
The Gaelic unit in Sleat now has a higher intake than the English unit, and I am told that the children in the Gaelic unit are ahead even in their English reading.
Manx Gaelic currently receives support from the Department of Education (DoE), MNH, MHF and the IOM Arts Council, however, the level of support remains modest when compared with support given to Scottish Gaelic, Welsh and Irish.
Bearing in mind the high level of parental support for Manx in schools, it is essential that the IOM Government, through DoE, makes a commitment to ensuring that the teaching of Manx in Manx schools is given a higher priority.
www.csis.ul.ie /staff/richard.sutcliffe/final_proceedings.htm   (18069 words)

  
 curious
Perhaps because Manx began separating from Irish in the 5th or 6th century A.D. while Scotts Gaelic didn't begin separating from until at least the 10th century.
Manx speakers were also in closer contact with Brythonic Celtic (Welsh, Cumbrian) speakers and Norse speakers than were Scotch and Irish speakers.
I find that Manx is quite similar to Irish Gaelic and when written down many of the words are practically identical to the corresponding Irish one.
www.irishgaelictranslator.com /translation/sutra9649.html   (894 words)

  
 Manx language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The last native speaker, Edward Maddrell, died in 1974, but by then a scholarly revival had begun to spread to the populace and many have learned Manx as a second language.
The spelling of Manx, unlike that of Irish and Scottish Gaelic, does not represent the Goidelic phonology, and more closely resembles an English speaker's attempt to write Gaelic.
This had the unfortunate result of making the spelling much less accurate than that of the other Gaelic languages, as many Goidelic grammatical and phonological features were obscured in the process.
www.peacelink.de /keyword/Manx_language.php   (267 words)

  
 Gaelic Fonts for MS-Windows   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Gaelic fonts available on the internet range from new ones, through well-established ones, to a number of old ones which are obsolete but show no sign of fading away.
Gaelic printing in Scotland and Man has always used the normal Latin letters, with the addition of some country-specific diacritics, and the same is nowadays true of Ireland.
Gaelic styles were used throughout the Gaelic world for manuscript work, but only in Ireland were they used in printing text, a practice which continued until quite recently.
www.smo.uhi.ac.uk /~oduibhin/mearchlar/fonts.htm   (6695 words)

  
 Manx_Gaelic_language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Manx dates to around the 5th century and is called Gaelg Vanninagh by Manx speakers.
The last native speaker, Ned Maddrell, died in 1974, but by then a scholarly revival had begun to spread to the populace and many had learned Manx as a second language.
Primary immersion education in Manx is provided by the Manx government.
www.comicscomics.com /search.php?title=Manx_Gaelic_language   (595 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Prior to the 15th century, most residents of Man spoke a dialect of Gaelic which eventually developed into a separate language called Manx Gaelic.
If anyone recorded a Manx name in a document, it would probably be in the Gaelic form common to Ireland and Scotland.
Manx names were formed along the same lines as Irish names.
www.panix.com /~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/1320.txt   (509 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Gaelic is an english word for any of three languages which form one half of the Celtic language family group.
Gaelic was in danger of being exterminated in many of the traditional gaelic speaking areas, but now a gaelic renaissance has slowed this trend if not yet reversed it.
Here is another useful comparison document that shows the similarities and differences between the Gaelic Languages.
www.ibiblio.org /gaelic/canan.html   (150 words)

  
 Goidelic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
This grouping is also sometimes called Gaelic, but this term can be ambiguous.
Although Irish and Manx are often referred to as Irish Gaelic and Manx Gaelic (and it is correct to describe them as Goidelic or Gaelic languages) this is unnecessary because the words Irish and Manx only ever refer to these languages whereas Scots by itself refers to the Germanic language.
Irish is also spoken by a few people in Northern Ireland and has been accorded some legal status there under the 1998 Belfast Agreement.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/G/Goidelic.htm   (618 words)

  
 Gaeilge : Learn the Irish language.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Manx is an ancient form of Gaelic very similar to 7th century Irish, and Scottish Gaelic and Irish Gaelic are basically the same language that split into two, about 300 years ago, for many historical reasons.
Irish speakers can understand Scottish Gaelic and Irish Gaelic can be mutually intelligible languages, but you'd need to study a bit to be able to understand the other.
The word for Manx Gaelic in that language is "Gaelg".
www.yaq.com /lang   (778 words)

  
 Gaelic and Scots Languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The North American Manx Association (NAMA) is a non-profit, ethnic and cultural heritage institution founded in 1928, as a successor organization to Mona's Relief Society of Cleveland, Ohio.
NAMA is a group of Americans and Canadians dedicated to the preservation and appreciation of the Manx culture.
An Comunn Gaidhealach is a voluntary organisation, with charitable status, founded in Oban in 1891 as a vehicle for the preservation and development of the Gaelic language.
clan-maccallum-malcolm.3acres.org /Gaelic.html   (603 words)

  
 Celtica - Gaelic, Gaeilge, Breton, Manx, Kernewek, Cymraec   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
A newspaper (primarily in English) that intends to be a meeting place for Gaels and anyone interested in Scottish Gaelic language and culture.
There is a Gaelic learners section and a bookstore with selection of Gaelic and English books.
Conradh na Gaeilge Shasana Nua (The Gaelic League of New England)
www.conjure.com /CELT/cgaelic.html   (381 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.