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Topic: Marcus Crassus


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  Crassus - LoveToKnow 1911
Crassus declared that Flaccus could not neglect his sacred office, and imposed a conditional fine on him in the event of his leaving Rome.
Crassus does not seem to have possessed much military ability, but he was greatly distinguished for his knowledge of law and his accomplished oratory.
Lucius Licinius Crassus (140-91 B.c.), the orator, of unknown parentage.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Crassus   (851 words)

  
  Marcus Licinius Crassus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Marcus Licinius Crassus was the son of a former consul and censor, Publius Licinius Crassus.
Crassus was vital to Sulla's final victory of the Social War in the momentous Battle of the Colline Gate in 82, in which he commanded the right wing of Sulla's army.
Crassus was a solid patron of the Eques, the largely plebeian merchant-financiers who continually chafed against their second-class political position and rights.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Marcus_Licinius_Crassus   (3531 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | Crassus by Plutarch
Crassus, however, was very eager to be hospitable to strangers; he kept open house, and to his friends he would lend money without interest, but called it in precisely at the time; so that his kindness was often thought worse than the paying the interest would have been.
Crassus hated him ever after, but was hindered by his son from doing him any injury; for Publius was a great lover of learning and eloquence, and a constant follower of Cicero, insomuch that he put himself into mourning when he was accused, and induced the other young men to do the same.
Crassus laughed at it, and hastened their march, and compelled his infantry to keep pace with his cavalry, till some few of the scouts returned and told them that their fellows were slain and they hardly escaped, that the enemy was at hand in full force, and resolved to give them battle.
classics.mit.edu /Plutarch/crassus.html   (5808 words)

  
 Marcus Licinius Crassus
Marcus Licinius Crassus (Approx 112 BC[?]-53 BC) was a powerful figure in Roman politics on account of his great wealth (he was nicknamed Dives, meaning "rich").
Crassus received Syria as his province, which promised to be an inexhaustible source of wealth.
However he also sought military glory, and crossed the Euphrates in an attempt to conquer Parthia only to be defeated at Carrhae (53 BC), now Haran[?], Turkey, and taken prisoner by Surenas[?], the Parthian general, who put him to death by pouring molten gold down his throat.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/cr/Crassus.html   (300 words)

  
 Crassus
115 - 53 BC Crassus was a lieutenant of the dictator Sulla.
He was the main administrator behind the proscriptions held by Sulla, and Crassus had made a fortune seizing the property of the murdered men.
Crassus did nothing to dispute this boast, for he saw an opportunity to form an alliance with the returning general.
dante.udallas.edu /hutchison/Fall_of_Republic/names/crassus.htm   (174 words)

  
 Julius Caesar: The Last Dictator   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Marcus was the son of a former Consul and Censor (97 and 89 BC), Publius Licinius Crassus.
Crassus hid in his cave for eight months; when he learned that Cinna was dead and Sulla's star on the rise, he raised a body of 2,500 men and eventually joined Sulla in the east.
Crassus used the feared and rarely used tactic of decimation to punish the weakest troops - all the soldiers drew lots and a tenth of the cohort - those with the marked lots - was beaten to death by fellow legionaries.
heraklia.fws1.com /contemporaries/crassus/crassus/Index.html   (3636 words)

  
 Marcus Licinius Crassus Summary
Crassus was treacherously slain at the conference on June 6, 53 B.C. Plutarch says that in Crassus many virtues were obscured by one vice, avarice.
Marcus Licinius Crassus was a powerful figure in Roman politics on account of his great wealth; he was nicknamed Dives, meaning "richest".
Crassus and Nicias - Demetrius and Antony - Demosthenes and Cicero - Dion and Brutus - Fabius and Pericles - Lucullus and Kimon
www.bookrags.com /Marcus_Licinius_Crassus   (1530 words)

  
 Crassus
Crassus grew up as the son of a consul and distinguished general.
Crassus was a decent both as a speaker and as a commander, but he struggled and failed to live up to comparison with these exceptional individuals.
Crassus was killed and it is said that his head as severed and molten gold was poured into his mouth as a mark of his infamous greed.
www.roman-empire.net /republic/crassus.html   (692 words)

  
 [No title]
Surena sent the head and hand of Crassus to Hyrodes the king, into Armenia, but himself by his messengers scattering a report that he was bringing Crassus alive to Seleucia, made a ridiculous procession, which, by way of scorn, he called a triumph.
For one Caius Paccianus, who of all the prisoners was most like Crassus, being put into a woman's dress of the fashion of the barbarians, and instructed to answer to the title of Crassus and Imperator, was brought sitting upon his horse, while before him went a parcel of trumpeters and lictors upon camels.
When the head of Crassus was brought to the door, the tables were just taken away, and one Jason, a tragic actor, of the town of Tralles, was singing the scene in the Bacchae of Euripides concerning Agave.
classics.mit.edu /Plutarch/crassus.1b.txt   (6008 words)

  
 Marcus Crassus - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia
Marcus Crassus ?-50BC?, was a famed wolf farmer, general, and loser.
Historical archives are extremely clear on when he was born, it was proven that he was born to 2 homosexual parents, of whom one of them had a sex change before being pregnant.
No one knows if Crassus died in hell or not, but some experts say that he couldn't have, since people can't die in hell, while others say that he's physically dead and his soul is wandering around in hell.
uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Marcus_Crassus   (501 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Crassus
He was named consul with Crassus in 70 bc and fought a notable campaign against Mithridates VI of Pontus in 66 bc.
He was tribune of the people (106 BC) and consul (95 BC) with Lucius Licinius Crassus (see under Crassus, family); together they collaborated on a law that caused a purge of the rolls of citizenship.
The name Carrhae is best known because of the battle of Carrhae in 53 BC M. Licinius Crassus (see Crassus, family) was defeated by the Parthians, who by their archery routed the Roman force.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Crassus&StartAt=1   (396 words)

  
 Crassus. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Crassus gained immense prestige—along with Pompey—for suppressing the uprising of Spartacus.
B.C., and Crassus’ rivalry and jealousy of Pompey grew.
Crassus seems to have backed the political maneuvers of the notorious Clodius, and trouble was stirred up between Crassus and Pompey.
www.bartleby.com /65/cr/Crassus.html   (493 words)

  
 Crassus Part 1/2
Although his father had been censor and had celebrated a triumph, Crassus grew up in a small house which was home not only to him and his parents but also to his two elder brothers and their families.
In the ensuing bloodbath, Crassus' father and one of his brothers were killed but Crassus himself escaped with three of his friends and ten servants to Spain, where his father had served as praetor.
Crassus won a reputation for himself as a soldier in Sulla's campaigns in Italy (83), but fell out of favour because of his excessive greed in purchasing estates at knock-down prices during Sulla's proscriptions of his political opponents.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/ancient_biographies/104270   (503 words)

  
 Statue of Marcus Licinius Crassus Dives pictures from italy photos on webshots
This may be due to the fact that Crassus was the money-man and behind-the-scenes person, not the adored general or the genius.
Marcus Licinius Crassus was the son of a former consul and censor, Publius Licinius Crassus.
Though his father had celebrated a triumph, Crassus grew up in a small house that was not only home to himself and his parents, but also to his two elder brothers and their families.
travel.webshots.com /photo/1474994788079267387ywVQbG   (458 words)

  
 Crassus and Parthia
This only inspired Crassus to anger and he vowed revenge, despite the fact that it was sound and practical advice.
He told Crassus that his cavalry would depart to harass the enemy where it could, but that the Romans should continue on through the heart of the desert terrain at all haste.
Crassus seemingly continued to trust the Nabataen commander, perhaps blinded by greed and told of fabulous riches.
www.unrv.com /fall-republic/crassus-and-parthia.php   (753 words)

  
 RedRampant.com
Crassus was convinced of the need for haste and decided to continue along the less secure desert route.
His advise was for Crassus to turn back and join forces in Armenia, or at least leave the desert for the defenses of more mountainess ground.
Crassus, however, was only angered by this and swore to punish Artabazes for this.
www.redrampant.com /roma/carrhae.html   (1334 words)

  
 Battles: The Battle of Carrhae :: 0 A.D. :: Wildfire Games
Marcus Linicus Crassus and son Publius were both killed at Carrhae along with 20,000 other Roman soldiers, the odds at Carrhae where 4-to-1 and in the Romans favor (in numbers only).
In the spring of 53 BC Marcus Linicus Crassus marched to Parthia with 45,000 legionnaires and 4,000 cavalry (this cavalry was on loan from Julius Caesar and was under Publius’s command).
Crassus and the main body of the ruined army arrived at Carrhae in the wee hours of June 10, one wing of the army under Varguntius got lost in the dark and dawn found them on a hill with Parthians circling around them like wolves, only 20 survived.
wildfiregames.com /0ad/page.php?p=1517   (1566 words)

  
 Crassus
3 Crassus, however, was very eager to be hospitable to strangers; he kept open house, and to his friends he would lend money without interest, but called it in precisely at the time; so that his kindness was often thought worse than the paying the interest would have been.
Crassus returned him but cold thanks for his readiness to serve him, and for the splendor of his assistance, and told him he was resolved to pass through Mesopotamia, where he had left a great many brave Roman soldiers; whereupon the Armenian went his way.
For one Gaius Paccianus, who of all the prisoners was most like Crassus, being put into a woman's dress of the fashion of the barbarians, and instructed to answer to the title of Crassus and Imperator, was brought sitting upon his horse, while before him went a parcel of trumpeters and lictors upon camels.
www.uvm.edu /~bsaylor/rome/crassus.html   (4619 words)

  
 Marcus Licinius Crassus
Marcus Licinius Crassus (115 - 53 BC) was the son of a Censor and of a prestigious Plebeian family.
At the Battle of the Colline Gate, Crassus was pivotal in turning the tide for Sulla, but favoritism showed towards Pompey began a life long rivalry between the two men.
While Crassus built a solid reputation as a soldier, Pompey was dubbed with the title Magnus (the Great) and was a personal favorite of Sulla.
www.unrv.com /roman-republic/crassus.php   (631 words)

  
 List of Republican Roman Consuls at AllExperts
450 Decemviri: Appius Claudius, Marcus Cornelius Maluginensis, Marcus Sergius, Lucius Minucius, Quintus Fabius Vibulanus, Quintus Poetelius, Titus Antonius Merenda, Gaius Duillius, Servius Opius Cornicen, Marcus Rabuleius.
373 Consular Tribunes Quintus Servilius, Gaius Veturius, Aulus and Marcus Cornelius, Quintus Quinctius, Marcus Fabius
130 Lucius Cornelius Lentulus, Marcus Perperna Suffect: Appius Claudius Nero
en.allexperts.com /e/l/li/list_of_republican_roman_consuls.htm   (2007 words)

  
 Untitled Document
One day, an impromptu bout is staged for the entertainment of some visiting Roman patricians: Marcus Crassus, his lady friend Helena, and the latter's brother Marcus Glabrus (to whom Crassus gives command of the garrison of Rome, in an effort to check the power of his senatorial opponent and democratic demagogue Gracchus).
To the horror of Crassus (who also loses his new body servant, Antoninus, to the rebels), Glabrus is manoeuvred by Gracchus into leading six cohorts of the garrison against Spartacus, and the result is a debacle for the Romans.
The moral point, of course, is the contrast between Crassus' unnatural passion for his body servant or the city-state and Spartacus and Varinia's liberated gambolling in the woods.
www.visual-memory.co.uk /sk/films/spartacus.html   (2034 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Search Results - Crassus
Crassus, Marcus Licinius (115?-53 bc), Roman politician and speculator, a member of the First Triumvirate.
Claudius Crassus, Appius (flourished 450 bc), Roman public official.
Roman politician Marcus Licinius Crassus (115?-53 bc) was among the wealthiest individuals in Rome during his lifetime.
ca.encarta.msn.com /Crassus.html   (97 words)

  
 M. Licinius Crassus
Though the initial engagement was a complete rout for the Romans, Crassus eventually cornered the rebellious slaves at the southern tip of Italy's boot, prevented them from crossing to Sicily, and won a decisive battle in which Spartacus was killed.
The next year Crassus claimed governorship of Syria, which he used as a base to launch a campaign against the Parthian empire.
Crassus' cavalry commander -- his son Publius -- committed suicide rather than face captivity, and Crassus himself was killed while trying to escape.
virtualreligion.net /iho/crassus.html   (488 words)

  
 The Roman Revolution   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Marcus Crassus was one of the wealthiest men in Rome.
By Crassus' time, they were truly numerous and a general rebellion stood a real chance of success.
Crassus, by 71, was the military hero he longed to be.
history.boisestate.edu /westciv/romanrev/17.shtml   (274 words)

  
 Crassus - Plutarch's Lives
And so Crassus perceiving it was a piece of pleasantry and of goodwill on the part of Vibius, took them in and kept them there with him as long as he stayed, and employed them to give information to Vibius of what they wanted, and how they were.
Crassus hated him ever after, but was hindered by his son from doing him any open injury; for Publius was a great lover of learning and eloquence, and a constant follower of Cicero, insomuch that he put himself into mourning when he was accused, and induced the other young men to do the same.
But Crassus answered, that if he had the least concern for his life, he would never have entrusted himself in their hands, but sent two brothers of the name of Roscius, to inquire on what terms, and in what numbers they should meet.
www.constitution.org /rom/plutarch/crassus.htm   (6097 words)

  
 The Real Spartacus
Crassus was the wealthiest man in Rome and a noble from an old plebeian family.
Crassus was given six new legions plus the four consular legions.
Crassus decimated the most cowardly cohort, then used his combined forces to defeat Spartacus, who retreated to Rhegium, in the toe of Italy.
www.historyinfilm.com /spart/real.htm   (1695 words)

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