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Topic: Marcus Junius Brutus


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In the News (Thu 18 Jul 19)

  
  Brutus, Marcus Junius - MSN Encarta
Marcus Junius Brutus (85–42 BC), or Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic.
Brutus, full name Marcus Junius Brutus (85?-42 bc), Roman political leader, son-in-law of the Roman philosopher Marcus Porcius Cato the Younger, born in Rome, and educated in law.
Brutus then fled to Macedonia, raised an army among the Greeks, and joined Cassius in Asia Minor to fight for the Roman Republic.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761568617/Brutus_Marcus_Junius.html   (269 words)

  
  Brutus - LoveToKnow 1911
Lucius Junius Brutus, one of the first two consuls, 509 B.C. According to the legends, his mother was the sister of Tarquinius Superbus, the last of the Roman kings, and his father and his elder brother had been put to death by the reigning family in order to get possession of his wealth.
Marcus JuNlus Brutus, a jurist of high authority, was considered as one of the founders of Roman civil law (Cicero, De Oratore, ii.
Marcus Junius Brutus (85, according to some, 79 or 78-42 B.C.), son of a father of the same name and of Servilia, half-sister of Cato of Utica, is the most famous of the name, and is the real hero of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Brutus   (1093 words)

  
 Marcus Junius Brutus
Marcus Junius Brutus Caepio (85 BC – 42 BC), or simply '''Brutus''', was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic.
Marcus Brutus was the son of Decimus Junius Brutus, a relatively unimportant politician, and Servilia Caepionis, half-sister of Cato The Younger and mistress of Julius Caesar.
Brutus' uncle Quintus Servilius Caepio adopted him when he was a young man and Brutus added his Cognomen to his own name.
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/Marcus_Junius_Brutus   (856 words)

  
 Marcus Junius Brutus - Background, Chronology, Later evaluations of Brutus
Marcus Junius Brutus (85 BC – 42 BC), or Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic.
Marcus Brutus's father, M. Some sources refer to the possibility of Caesar being his real father, but this is unlikely since Caesar was fifteen years old at the time of Brutus' birth and the affair with his mother started some ten years later.
Brutus' uncle Quintus Servilius Caepio adopted him when he was a young man and Brutus was known as Q. Servilius Caepio Brutus for an unknown period of time.
encyclopedia.stateuniversity.com /pages/14305/Marcus-Junius-Brutus.html   (812 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | Marcus Brutus by Plutarch
Marcus Brutus was descended from that Junius Brutus to whom the ancient Romans erected a statue of brass in the capitol among the images of their kings with a drawn sword in his hand, in remembrance of his courage and resolution in expelling the Tarquins and destroying the monarchy.
Brutus growing very faint, and there being none in the whole army that had anything for him to eat, his servants were forced to have recourse to the enemy, and, going as far as to the gates of the city, begged bread of the sentinels that were upon duty.
That of Brutus was somewhat less in number than that of Caesar, but in the splendidness of the men's arms and richness of their equipage it wonderfully exceeded; for most of their arms were of gold and silver, which Brutus had lavishly bestowed among them.
classics.mit.edu /Plutarch/m_brutus.html   (6757 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Marcus Junius Brutus
Brutus was the son of Marcus Junius Brutus the Elder and Servilia Caepionis.
Brutus' uncle, Quintus Servilius Caepio, adopted him when he was a young man and Brutus was known as Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus for an unknown period of time.
Marcus Tullius Cicero, angry at Octavian, wrote a letter to Brutus explaining that the forces of Octavian and Mark Antony were divided.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Marcus_Junius_Brutus   (1922 words)

  
 Marcus Junius Brutus – FREE Marcus Junius Brutus Information | Encyclopedia.com: Find Marcus Junius Brutus Research
Brutus, Marcus Junius (85–42 bc) Roman republican leader, one of the principal assassins of Julius Caesar.
B.C., Gaius Julius Caesar, dictator of Rome, was stabbed to death in the Roman Senate by 60 conspirators led by Marcus Junius Brutus.
Julius Caesar Ciaran Hinds Pompey Magnus Kenneth Cranham Atia of the Julii Polly Walker Mark Antony James Purefoy Marcus Junius Brutus Robias Menzies Servilla of the Junii Lindsay Duncan Niobe Indira Varma Gaius Octavian Max Pirkis Octavia of the...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1O142-BrutusMarcusJunius.html   (836 words)

  
 Marcus Junius Brutus, 85-42 BC
There are even confused indications in some sources (of dubious authenticity) that Brutus was adopted into the Caepio family and, thus, is the young Caepio originally affianced to Julia, Caesar's daughter before Caesar broke off her engagement and married his daughter to Pompey.
Cicero, discovering Brutus' acts when he became governor of Cilicia, was frankly appalled and wrote to Atticus at wearisome length; he also remonstrated with Brutus at his ruthless pillaging of the Salamian populace.
Brutus escaped the debacle of Pompey's defeat and, traveling to Larissa, wrote Caesar, who invited Brutus to join his inner circle and pardoned him on the spot.
web.mac.com /heraklia/Caesar/contemporaries/brutus/index.html   (1840 words)

  
 Biography of Brutus   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Marcus Junius Brutus Caepio (85 BC-42 BC), or simply Brutus, was a Roman politician of the late Roman Republic.
Brutus was the son of Marcus Junius Brutus, a relatively unimportant politician, and Servilia Caepionis, half-sister of Cato the younger and mistress of Julius Caesar.
Dante considered Brutus to be the epitome of shameful betrayal, and in his Inferno section of the Divine Comedy (Inferno, XXXIV, 64-67), portrayed Brutus being chewed, but never consumed, by Satan, along with Judas Iscariot and Cassius at the very lowest level of Hell.
biography-3.qardinalinfo.com /b/Brutus.html   (836 words)

  
 Marcus Junius Brutus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Marcus Junius Brutus (85 BC 42 BC), or Quintus Servilius Caepio Brutus, was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic.
Brutus' uncle Quintus Servilius Caepio adopted him when he was a young man and Brutus was known as Q. Servilius Caepio Brutus for an unknown period of time.
Dante considered Brutus to be the epitome of shameful betrayal, and in his Inferno section of the Divine Comedy (Inferno, XXXIV, 64-67), portrayed Brutus being chewed, but never consumed, by Satan, along with Judas Iscariot and Gaius Cassius Longinus at the very lowest level of Hell.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Marcus_Junius_Brutus   (1318 words)

  
 Plutarch's Life of Marcus Brutus
Junius Brutus to whom the ancient Romans erected a statue of brass in the capitol among the images of their kings with a drawn sword in his hand, in remembrance of his courage and resolution in expelling the Tarquins and destroying the monarchy.
Brutus who expelled the Tarquins, there being none of his race left after the execution of his two sons; but that his ancestor was a plebeian, son of one Brutus, a steward, and only rose in the latest times to office or dignity in the commonwealth.
Cato [the Younger], and Brutus, her cousin-german, had married her very young, though not a maid, but after the death of her former husband, by whom she had one son, that was named Bibulus; and there is a little book, called Memoirs of Brutus, written by him, yet extant.
www.bostonleadershipbuilders.com /plutarch/marcusbrutus.htm   (10243 words)

  
 Brutus - NumisWiki, The Collaborative Numismatics Project
BRUTUS (MARCUS JUNIUS), called by some the tyrannicide, was son of M. Junius Brutus and of Servilia, who was half sister of Cato of Utica, by the mother's side.
It is not certain that he was descended from the celebrated Brutus, who drove the Tarquins from Rome, and served the first consulate of the republic: although the portraitures and inscriptions on his family coins shew that he laid pretensions to the origin.
Caesar in fact gave Brutus the government of Cisalpine Gaul, and the praetorship of Rome: favours which he repaid, be becoming, in conjunction with C. Cassius, the foremost of his assasins.
www.forumancientcoins.com /numiswiki/view.asp?key=Brutus   (639 words)

  
 Brieven aan en van Brutus, Cicero (43 v. Chr.)
Marcus Junius Brutus was by the mother's side nephew of M. Cato (Uticensis).
I have made good, Brutus, every duty to the state, to which a man was bound, who occupied the station in which I have been placed by the judgment of the senate and people.
And when I proposed this honour to Brutus I wished that there should be in the fasti an eternal memorial of a most welcome victory: and yet on that very day I discovered that the ill-disposed in the senate were somewhat in a majority over the grateful.
www.republikanisme.nl /brutus.html   (11935 words)

  
 Brutus
Marcus Junius Brutus was born in or about 85 BCE, as the eldest son of a Roman politician with the same name, a man who never made it to the top.
Brutus was now considered to be a friend of Caesar, who sent him on an important mission to the east, made him governor of Cisalpine Gaul (i.e., the Po plains) in the years 46-45, choose him as praetor for the year 44 and promised him the consulate in 41.
Brutus had shown that he had, to use a word of Cicero, 'the courage of a man and the brains of child'.
www.livius.org /bn-bz/brutus/brutus02.html   (1696 words)

  
 Marcus Junius Brutus
Brutus was the son of Marcus Junius Brutus and Servilia, half sister of Cato the Younger.
He was a friend of the orator Cicero, who dedicated to him several of his writings and gave the name Brutus to his celebrated dialogue on illustrious orators.
Brutus, whose army is crushed by Anthony and Octavian at Philippi, commits suicide in Rome by falling on his own sword.
www.thehistorychannel.co.uk /site/encyclopedia/article_show/Brutus/m0003262.html   (507 words)

  
 Download Brutus 2006, Full and Free Brutus Software Downloads   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Brutus was the son of Decimus Junius Brutus, a relatively unimportant politician, and Servilia Caepionis, half-sister of.
Marcus Junius Brutus Caepio (c.85-42): Roman politician, murderer of Caius Julius Caesar and one of the last defenders of the republic.
Marcus Junius Brutus was born in or about 85 BCE, as the eldest son of a Roman politician it to the top.
www.diselpay.com /download/22032-brutus-2006.html   (344 words)

  
 Salem Press
Marcus Porcius Cato (also known as Cato the Younger), Brutus's uncle and one of the fiercest adherents of the conservative faction in Roman politics, played a major role in Brutus's education.
Brutus served under Cato in Cyprus in 58 and was a monetalis (a worker in the mint) probably in 55.
Brutus became urban praetor in 44 and was promised the consulship for 41.
salempress.com /Store/samples/great_lives_from_history_notorious/great_lives_from_history_brutus.htm   (1141 words)

  
 Marcus Junius Brutus and the Ancient Roman Coin Denarius | Ancient Coins | articles
Marcus Junius Brutus, was also known under the name of Quintus Caepio Brutus.
Brutus’ decision to support Pompey is even more unusual since Pompey was the one to murder his father.
Possible motives for Brutus were the salvation of the Republic from dictatorship as well as royal ambitions of Caesar.
dig4coins.com /articles/ancient-coins/marcus-junius-brutus-and-the-ancient-roman-coin-denarius.html   (794 words)

  
 Brutus   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Junius Brutus was legendary for expelling the last of the kings to rule Rome and establishing the Republic in 509 BC.
Marcus Junius Brutus, also known as Quintus Caepio Brutus, achieved fame as a reluctant leader in the assassination of Julius Caesar.
On both his father's and mother's sides, Brutus claimed descent from early Roman statesman legendary for their fights against tyrants and kings and in favor of the Republic.
members.aol.com /dkaplan888/brut.htm   (300 words)

  
 Brutus
Marcus Junius Brutus—born in either 85, 79, or 78 B.C. depending upon whom one cites—was a Roman politician during the time of Julius Caesar.
Brutus arrived in Samoa on 29 April and operated among the islands until early July.
Sometime during the middle of 1903, Brutus was assigned to the Asiatic Fleet.
www.history.navy.mil /danfs/b10/brutus-i.htm   (1218 words)

  
 Marcus Brutus
Brutus felt the rule an oppression, but Cassius hated the ruler; and, among other reasons on which he grounded his quarrel against Cæsar, the loss of his lions which he had procured when he was ædile-elect was one; for Cæsar, finding these in Megara, when that city was taken by Calenus, seized them to himself.
That of Brutus was somewhat less in number than that of Cæsar, but in the splendidness of the men's arms and richness of their equipage it wonderfully exceeded; for most of their arms were of gold and silver, which Brutus had lavishly bestowed among them.
Brutus, having brought his army into the field and set them in array against the enemy, paused a long while before he would fight; for as he was reviewing the troops, suspicions were excited and informations laid against some of them.
www.english.upenn.edu /Projects/knarf/Plutarch/brutus.html   (9712 words)

  
 Marcus Junius Brutus   (Site not responding. Last check: )
'''Marcus Junius Brutus Caepio''' (85 BC–42 BC), or simply Brutus, was a Roman senator of the late Roman Republic.
Brutus was the son of Decimus Junius Brutus, a relatively unimportant politician, and Servilia Caepionis, half-sister of Cato the younger and mistress of Julius Caesar.
Brutus' uncle Quintus Servilius Caepio adopted him when he was a young man and Brutus added his cognomen to his own name.
marcus-junius-brutus.iqnaut.net   (1006 words)

  
 Brutus, Marcus Junius
Brutus joined the optimates (who aimed to increase the authority of the Senate) on the outbreak of civil war in 49
After Caesar's murder, Brutus spent a short time in Italy before taking possession of his province of Macedonia.
Brutus inflicted a sharp reverse on Octavian's soldiers in the first battle, but could not prevent the defeat and suicide of Cassius.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0003262.html   (244 words)

  
 Marcus Brutus - Plutarch's Lives
arcus Brutus was descended from that Junius Brutus to whom the ancient Romans erected a statue of brass in the capitol among the images of their kings with a drawn sword in his hand, in remembrance of his courage and resolution in expelling the Tarquins and destroying the monarchy.
Brutus took ship from hence, and sailed to Athens where he was received by the people with great demonstrations of kindness, expressed in their acclamations and the honors that were decreed him.
Brutus, smiling with much meaning, said to Volumnius, “It is all drunk; but you shall have some more fetched.” But he that had brought the first water, being sent again, was in great danger of being taken by the enemy, and, having received a wound, with much difficulty escaped.
www.constitution.org /rom/plutarch/marcusbrutus.htm   (9644 words)

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