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Topic: Mardonius


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  Battles of Xerxes I
Mardonius positioned the native Persian troops facing the Lacedaemonians, the best of these troops facing the Spartans while the remainder covering the Tegeans on their left.
Mardonius then sent a herald forward with a message that chastised the Spartans for their inaction and when this too did not get a response he ordered a very cuning tactic.
Mardonius, riding his white charger and surrounded by 1,000 picked Persian troops, (it is not mentioned whether these were infantry or cavalry), fought in the front of the line.
members.ozemail.com.au /~ancientpersia/B_xerxes.html   (2710 words)

  
  Mardonius
Mardonius was a Persian commander during the Persian Wars with Greece in the 5th century BC.
Mardonius himself was commanding the army at the time, which was fighting a battle in Thrace.
Mardonius was wounded, but was victorious; nevertheless, the loss of the fleet caused him to retreat back into Asia Minor.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/m/ma/mardonius.html   (479 words)

  
 Mardonius Information
Mardonius himself was commanding the army at the time, which was fighting a battle in Thrace.
Mardonius was wounded, but was victorious; nevertheless, the loss of the fleet caused him to retreat back into Asia Minor.
Mardonius prepared to meet them at Plataea, despite the opposition from another Persian commander, Artabazus, who, like Artabanus, did not think that a much larger Persian army could automatically defeat the Greeks.
www.bookrags.com /Mardonius   (443 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Mardonius
It was the wish of Mardonius to escort the king a part of the way...
Mardonius' fleet was destroyed in a storm while sailing around the tip of the peninsula, and Xerxes...
At Plataea, Mardonius was met in battle by a Spartan army led...
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Mardonius   (1063 words)

  
 HELLAS:NET - Warfare   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mardonius was the son-in-law of the father of Xerxes, Darius, and was in command of the fleet that was destroyed at the peninsula of Athos.
Mardonius had chosen the battlefield at Plataea, south of Thebes, because the plains at the south and west of his camp are very suitable for his cavalry.
Mardonius came to the conclusion that his cavalry could not be used for a charge as long as the Greeks stayed in the foothills, but he could still use them to cut the Greeks off from their provisions.
monolith.dnsalias.org /~marsares/warfare/battle/plataea.html   (1874 words)

  
 Mardonius - Encyclopedia.com
In 492 B.C., the fleet of the Persian general Mardonius was destroyed in a storm as it sailed around the peninsula...
Xerxes moved north with his fleet and army, leaving Mardonius with the army in Greece to be defeated in the next year by...
As far back as 480BC the Persian general Mardonius, in the aftermath of his victory at Thermopylae, wondered openly where the bulk of the Greek forces were.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Mardoniu.html   (894 words)

  
 Battle of Plataea - Definition, explanation
Mardonius, through Alexander I of Macedon, asked for a truce with Athens, offering autonomous government and Persian aid in rebuilding their city.
Mardonius fortified the Asopus river in Boeotia, hoping that the Greeks would be unable to unite against him.
Mardonius sent a cavalry charge under the commander Masistius to take the pass, but Masistius was resisted by the Megarans and Athenians under the command of Olympiodorus.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/b/ba/battle_of_plataea.php   (798 words)

  
 Battles: The Battle of Plataea :: 0 A.D. :: Wildfire Games
Mardonius, the Persian commander, was a force to be reckoned with to the united Greeks.
Mardonius of Persia had chosen Platae, plains south of the city Thebes to battle the Greeks because his cavalry would perform more efficiently in a flat land area, and he knew what battling hoplites in rough or narrow terrain meant after witnessing much of the carnage at Thermopylae.
Mardonius did not realise that his cavalry would be so ineffective in the comparatively rough terrain the Greeks had chosen, as he ordered a major cavalry charge to begin the battle.
wildfiregames.com /0ad/page.php?p=1503   (1771 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Mardonius
Mardonius himself was commanding the army at the time, which was fighting a battle in Thrace.
Mardonius was wounded, but was victorious; nevertheless, the loss of the fleet caused him to retreat back into Asia Minor.
Mardonius prepared to meet them at Plataea, despite the opposition from another Persian commander, Artabazus, who, like Artabanus, did not think that a much larger Persian army could automatically defeat the Greeks.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Mardonius   (508 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Battle of Plataea   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mardonius, through Alexander I of Macedon, asked for a truce with Athens, offering autonomous government and Persian aid in rebuilding their city.
Mardonius fortified the Asopus river in Boeotia, hoping that the Greeks would be unable to unite against him.
Mardonius sent a cavalry charge under the commander Masistius to take the pass, but Masistius was resisted by the Megarans and Athenians under the command of Olympiodorus.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Battle_of_Plataea   (729 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | The History of Herodotus by Herodotus
Still the cavalry of Mardonius harassed and annoyed the Greeks incessantly; for the Thebans, who were zealous in the cause of the Medes, pressed the war forward with all eagerness, and often led the charge till the lines met, when the Medes and Persians took their place, and displayed, many of them, uncommon valour.
So long as Mardonius was alive, this body resisted all attacks, and, while they defended their own lives, struck down no small number of Spartans; but after Mardonius fell, and the troops with him, which were the main strength of the army, perished, the remainder yielded to the Lacedaemonians, and took to flight.
Mardonius was slain by Aeimnestus, a man famous in Sparta- the same who in the Messenian war, which came after the struggle against the Medes, fought a battle near Stenyclerus with but three hundred men against the whole force of the Messenians, and himself perished, and the three hundred with him.
classics.mit.edu /Herodotus/history.9.ix.html   (9762 words)

  
 Iranica.com - HERODOTUS
Mardonius was also aiming at naval supremacy—on land he already considered himself as the most powerful—and wanted over and above his actual task to win mastery over both elements.
Mardonius was unable to restrain his arrogant behavior, so he ignored the pernicious river border and was defeated because of his own aggressiveness.
Mardonius and his comrades-in-arms were killed, and Herodotus particularly refers to their light armor as a disadvantage (9.63.2).
www.iranica.com /newsite/articles/v12f3/v12f3016h.html   (2049 words)

  
 Summary of and commentary on Herodotus' Histories, book 9
When the Persian general Mardonius learns that the Athenians are not willing to come to terms, he mobilizes his army and marches to Athens.
Mardonius' force was smaller than the huge army of Xerxes; consequently, it was more mobile and easier to supply.
Mardonius will have none of it: he overrules his seers by quoting one of the responses of the Greek oracles he had consulted during the winter (above).
www.livius.org /he-hg/herodotus/logos9_26.html   (1560 words)

  
 The battle of Marathon
Meanwhile Mardonius, in 492, has established a strong position in the Hellespont and given the task of controlling Thrace and Macedonia as a Satrap.
Mardonius himself is with the army and while they camp overnight they are attacked by a group of wild Thracian tribe, the Briygi and suffer major casualties.
An expedition by Persia is launched, not by Mardonius, who is presumably injured -so we get Datis whose background may be traced to Lade (see Ionia).
www.herodotuswebsite.co.uk /marathon.htm   (2379 words)

  
 Plataia
Mardonius then ordered his cavalry, led by Masistios, to intercept the Greeks as they emerged from the pass.
The Persian infantry, however, often harassed the Greeks by continually shooting arrows at those drawing water from the river, and the Greeks were forced to rely instead on a spring at Gargafia to their rear.
Mardonius was killed in this battle along with many of his troops, and the remainder back to the base camp, north of the Asopos.
www.faculty.fairfield.edu /rosivach/cl115/military/plataia.htm   (813 words)

  
 Mardonius
Mardonius was the son of Gobryas, a Persian nobleman who had assisted the Achaemenid prince Darius when he claimed the throne.
That Mardonius was the last-mentioned couple's firstborn son is very likely, because he has the same name as Gobryas' father (which is known from the Behistun inscription).
One of Mardonius subordinates, Artabazus, was able to lead a large Persian contingent back to Asia, for which he was rewarded by Xerxes, who offered him the satrapy of Hellespontine Phrygia, i.e., the northwest of what is now Turkey.
www.livius.org /man-md/mardonius/mardonius.html   (2236 words)

  
 Mardonius * People, Places, & Things * Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant
Darius was not deterred in his desire to conquer the Greeks but, when his invading troops were utterly defeated at Marathon in 490 BCE, he left the Greeks who had not already surrendered to him alone and made no demands for tribute or loyalty.
Mardonius also encouraged Xerxes by telling him of the untold riches that awaited him in Europe with its fertile lands and uncounted trees; aside from the Greeks, there were no civilized people in Europe, i.e.
There were seven military commanders of the Persian invasion of Greece but Mardonius was by far the most trusted and respected by the Great King; this trust and respect would later be the bindings on Mardonius’ death shroud.
www.messagenet.com /myths/ppt/Mardonius_1.html   (409 words)

  
 Detail Page   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mardonius' army included Greek soldiers from the mainland regions of Thessaly and Boeotia, whose cities were actively collaborating with the Persians.
On receiving news of a Greek allied army's approach from the south, Mardonius withdrew toward friendly Thebes, the chief city of Boeotia.
The melee wore on until Mardonius was killed, hit in the head with a stone thrown by a Spartan.
www.fofweb.com /Onfiles/Ancient/AncientDetail.asp?iPin=GRE0412   (812 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: Xerxes by Jacob Abbott
Mardonius, after much hesitation, concluded to speak to him, and endeavor to dispel his anxieties and fears, and lead him to take a more favorable view of the prospects of the expedition.
"Mardonius proposes," said he, "that the expedition should on no account be abandoned in consequence of this disaster, for he says that the fleet is a very unimportant part of our force, and that the army still remains unharmed.
Mardonius was a general of great military experience and skill, and, when left to himself, he found no great difficulty in reorganizing the army, and in putting it again in an efficient condition.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=abbott&book=xerxes&story=persia   (2867 words)

  
 Aristides the Just
Mardonius sent messages of defiance to the Greeks, telling them that Salamis was not a serious setback for the Persians, who would crush the Greeks in a fight on solid ground if they would dare to come to the broad fields of Thessaly.
As he urged them to hurry up and send some men to stop Mardonius, the Spartans pretended to be taking it easy, and they laughed when Aristides complained of their delay.
At daybreak, Mardonius saw that there were only Amompharetus and a few men left in the Greek camp, and he concluded that the others had run away out of cowardice, leaving only these few who wanted to keep fighting.
www.e-classics.com /ARISTIDES.htm   (5731 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: Pictures from Greek Life and Story by Alfred J. Church
Mardonius evacuated Athens, not forgetting to complete the work of destruction before he departed, marched through the passes of Mount Parnes, and took up his position on the left bank of the river Asopus.
What would have been the result if Mardonius had followed the policy of delay, urged upon him by his Theban allies, while he continued to use his superiority in cavalry to annoy his adversaries, it is impossible to say.
Mardonius and his bodyguard of a thousand Immortals had perished earlier in the day; before nightfall the huge Persian host had practically ceased to exist.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=church&book=greek&story=bow   (2753 words)

  
 Artemisia warns wisely against a
When Xerxes heard that, he was as glad and joyful as a man in his situation might be and said to Mardonius that he would answer him after deliberating which of the two plans he would follow.
If, on the other hand, the issue is contrary to Mardonius' expectation, it is no great misfortune so long as you and all that household of yours are safe; [3] for while you and the members of your household are safe, many a time will the Greeks have to fight for their lives.
As for Mardonius, if any disaster befalls him, it is does not much matter, nor will any victory of the Greeks be a real victory when they have but slain your servant.
courses.missouristate.edu /ECarawan/Artemisia.htm   (1174 words)

  
 Herodotus' Persian Wars - (CAIS)
[9.1] Mardonius, when Alexander upon his return made known to him the answer of the Athenians, forthwith broke up from Thessaly, and led his army with all speed against Athens; forcing the several nations through whose land he passed to furnish him with additional troops.
[9.42] When Mardonius had thus declared his sentiments, no one ventured to say him nay; and accordingly his opinion prevailed, for it was to him, and not to Artabazus, that the king had given the command of the army.
Mardonius was slain by Aeimnestus, a man famous in Sparta - the same who in the Messenian war, which came after the struggle against the Medes, fought a battle near Stenyclerus with but three hundred men against the whole force of the Messenians, and himself perished, and the three hundred with him.
www.cais-soas.com /CAIS/History/hakhamaneshian/herodotus-persian.wars/persian_wars_bk9_calliope.htm   (14436 words)

  
 Persian Wars 9 : Calliope
As soon then as there was silence throughout the camp, - the night being now well advanced, and the men seeming to be in their deepest sleep, - Alexander, the son of Amyntas, king and leader of the Macedonians, rode up on horseback to the Athenian outposts, and desired to speak with the generals.
Mardonius was slain by Aeimnestus, a man famous in Sparta - the same who in the Messenian war, which came after the struggle against the Medes, fought a battle near Stenyclerus with but three hundred men against the whole force of the Messenians, and himself perished, and the three hundred with him.
Mardonius and his host are close behind me, and may be looked for shortly.
www.earth-history.com /Persian/Herod/herodotus-wars-9.htm   (16582 words)

  
 Mardonius * People, Places, & Things * Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant
Darius was not deterred in his desire to conquer the Greeks but, when his invading troops were utterly defeated at Marathon in 490 BCE, he left the Greeks who had not already surrendered to him alone and made no demands for tribute or loyalty.
Mardonius also encouraged Xerxes by telling him of the untold riches that awaited him in Europe with its fertile lands and uncounted trees; aside from the Greeks, there were no civilized people in Europe, i.e.
There were seven military commanders of the Persian invasion of Greece but Mardonius was by far the most trusted and respected by the Great King; this trust and respect would later be the bindings on Mardonius’ death shroud.
messagenet.com /myths/ppt/Mardonius_1.html   (409 words)

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