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Topic: Martial law


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  Martial law - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice.
Martial law was first used in Australia from midnight Sunday 4 March, 1804 during the Castle Hill convict rebellion, also known as the second Battle of Vinegar Hill, a reference to the Irish engagement of 1798 in which many of the convicts had previously been involved.
In the aftermath of the 228 Incident of 1947, martial law was declared in 1948, and the perceived need to suppress Communist and pro-democracy activities on the island meant that the martial law was not lifted until 1987.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Martial_law   (1918 words)

  
 Martial law - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a particular situation requires that a military authority take control of the normal administration of justice (and usually of the whole state).
Martial law is instituted most often when it becomes necessary to favour the activity of military authorities and organs, usually for urgent unforeseen needs, and when the normal institutions of justice either cannot function or could be deemed too slow or to weak for the new situation, i.e.
Martial law was introduced in Poland by the Communist regime on December 13, 1981 to prevent democratic movements (such as Solidarity) from gaining popularity and attendant political power in the country.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Martial_law   (484 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Martial law
In common law, posse comitatus (Latin, roughly translated as to be able to be made into part of a retinue or force) referred to the authority wielded by the county sheriff to conscript any able-bodied male over the age of fifteen to assist him in keeping the peace or...
Broadcast of Wojciech Jaruzelski declaring martial law (December 13, 1981) The period of martial law in Poland refers to the time from December 13, 1981 to July 22, 1983 when the government of the Peoples Republic of Poland drastically restricted normal life.
Martial law is instituted most often when it becomes necessary to favour the activity of military authorities and organizations, usually for urgent unforeseen needs, and when the normal institutions of justice either cannot function or could be deemed too slow or too weak for the new situation, i.e.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Martial-law   (6434 words)

  
 Martial law - Voyager, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Due to the assasination of President Anwar el-Sadat in 1981, martial law was declared in Egypt.
The declaration of martial law was initially well-received, but became unpopular as excesses and human rights abuses by the military emerged.Torture was used in extracting information to their enemies.
In January of 2004, the current President of Thailand, Thaksin Shinawatra, declared a state of martial law in the provinces of Pattani, Yala, and Narathiwat in response to the growing South Thailand insurgency.
voyager.in /Martial_Law   (1079 words)

  
 Martial law - One Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Usually martial law reduces some of the personal rights ordinarily granted to the citizen, limits the length of the trial processes, no sex, and prescribes more severe penalties than ordinary law.
On September 21, 1972, President Ferdinand Marcos issued Proclamation 1081 declaring martial law in the Philippines after a series of bombings and civil strife perpetrated by the Communist Party of the Philippines.
See also: military law, Military rule, state of emergency.
www.onelang.com /encyclopedia/index.php/Martial_law   (523 words)

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