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Topic: Mary I of England


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In the News (Tue 16 Apr 19)

  
  Videotape English Ancestors Mary and John 1630 tour the West Country England and New England
For those descendants of the passengers of the Mary and John of 1630 who have not yet visited England here is an opportunity to visit the hometowns and churches of their English ancestors.
The Mary and John Clearing House videotaped and edited this magnificent performance into a 48 minute video tape program that really is a treat to watch for individuals, English ancestors, English descendants or others at a genealogy meeting or reunion.
For many of the Descendants and ancestors of the passengers of the Mary and John 1630, this was an emotional, entertaining and moving experience.
www.maryandjohn1630.com /videos.html   (869 words)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
One is that it refers to Mary I of Scotland, with "how does your garden grow" referring to her reign, "silver bells" referring to (Catholic) cathedral bells, "cockleshells" insinuating that her husband cheated on her, and "pretty maids all in a row" referring to her babies that died.
Another is that it refers to Mary I of England and her unpopular attempts to bring Roman Catholicism back to England, identifying the "cockle shells," for example, with the symbol of pilgrimage to the shrine of Saint James in Spain (Santiago de Compostela) and the "pretty maids all in a row" with nuns.
Mary Mary is one of the many bizarre Fables imprisoned at the Golden Boughs Retirement Village in the comic Jack of Fables.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Mary,-Mary,-Quite-Contrary   (1510 words)

  
  Mary I of Scotland
Mary, Queen of Scots is often confused with her second cousin once removed Mary I of England who lived at approximately the same time (1516 - 1558).
Mary, being a devout Roman Catholic, was regarded with suspicion by many of her subjects as well as by Elizabeth I of England, her cousin and the monarch of the neighbouring Protestant country.
Mary eventually became a liability Elizabeth could no longer tolerate because of numerous plots to kill Elizabeth and replace her with Mary, and she was executed at Fotheringhay Castle on February 8, 1587, on suspicion of having been involved in a plot - the Babington plot - to murder Elizabeth.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ma/Mary_I_of_Scotland.html   (1400 words)

  
 Luminarium Encyclopedia: Mary I, Queen of England (1516-1558)
MARY I, queen of England (1516-1558), unpleasantly remembered as "the Bloody Mary" on account of the religious persecutions which prevailed during her reign, was the daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, born in the earlier years of their married life, when as yet no cloud had darkened the prospect of Henry's reign.
Mary was little more than two years old when she was proposed in marriage to the dauphin, son of Francis I.
Mary was of weak constitution and subject to frequent illnesses, both before and after her accession.
www.luminarium.org /encyclopedia/queenmary.htm   (2870 words)

  
  Mary I of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mary, the fourth and penultimate monarch of the Tudor dynasty, is remembered for her attempt to return England from Protestantism to Roman Catholicism.
Mary suffered a phantom pregnancy; Philip released the Lady Elizabeth from house arrest so that he could be viewed favourably by her in case Mary died during childbirth.
When Mary ascended the Throne, she was proclaimed under the same official style as Henry VIII and Edward VI: "Mary, by the Grace of God, Queen of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith and of the Church of England and also of Ireland in Earth Supreme Head".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mary_I_of_England   (3300 words)

  
 Mary I of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mary was crowned as Queen of Scots in the Chapel Royal at Stirling Castle on September 9, 1543.
Mary, being a devout Roman Catholic, was regarded with suspicion by many of her subjects as well as by Elizabeth I of England, her father's cousin and the monarch of the neighbouring Protestant country.
Mary argued that her handwriting was not difficult to imitate, and it has frequently been suggested either that the letters are complete forgeries, that incriminating passages were inserted before the inquiry, or that the letters were written to Bothwell by some other person.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mary_I_of_Scotland   (4130 words)

  
 Queen Mary I
Mary I, Queen of England, unpleasantly remembered as "the Bloody Mary" on account of the religious persecutions which prevailed during her reign, was the daughter of King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, born in the earlier years of their married life, when as yet no cloud had darkened the prospect of Henry's reign.
Mary was little more than two years old when she was proposed in marriage to the dauphin, son of Francis I. Three years afterwards the French alliance was broken off, and in 1522 she was affianced to her cousin the young emperor Charles V by the Treaty of Windsor.
Mary was then urged to make a humble submission to her father as the means of recovering his favor, and after a good deal of correspondence with the king's secretary, Thomas Cromwell, she actually did so.
www.nndb.com /people/557/000093278   (2746 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
Mary I, daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, was born in 1516 and suffered through a terrible childhood of neglect, intolerance, and ill-health.
Mary began her tumultuous reign at 37 years of age, arriving in London amid a scene of great rejoicing.
England suffered during the reign of Mary I: the economy was in ruin, religious dissent reached a zenith and England lost her last continental territory.
www.britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon44.html   (428 words)

  
 Mary I - MSN Encarta
Mary was born in London on February 18, 1516, the daughter of Henry VIII of England, by his first wife, Catherine of Aragón.
The engagement was greeted in England by a formidable rebellion under the leadership of Sir Thomas Wyatt to depose Mary and put her half sister, Elizabeth, later Elizabeth I, on the throne.
She was called Bloody Mary because of a large number of religious persecutions that took place during her reign; almost 300 people were condemned to death as a result of trials for heresy.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761562599/Mary_I.html   (333 words)

  
 Mary I of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Mary had always rejected the break with Rome that her father had instituted and the establishment of the Anglican Church that had flowed from her half-brother's protestantism, andnow she tried to turn England back to Roman Catholicism.
Mary I of England is sometimes confused with her cousin Mary,Queen of Scots, who lived at the same time.
Many scholars trace the nursery rhyme "Mary, Mary, quite contrary" to her unpopular attempts to bring Roman Catholicism backto England, identfying the "cockle shells", for example, with the symbol of pilgrimage to the shrine of Saint James in Spain and the "pretty maids all in a row" with nuns.
www.therfcc.org /mary-i-of-england-39852.html   (593 words)

  
 Mary I
Mary Tudor was the only child born to Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon to survive childhood.
Mary had a good childhood as a young princess, and was the center of court attention in her earliest years.
Mary was apparently appalled at her father's action and there were come quarrels between Mary and Kathryn during the young Queen's reign.
tudorhistory.org /mary   (1086 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Mary Tudor
Queen of England from 1553 to 1558; born 18 February, 1516; died 17 November, 1558.
Mary behaved with conspicuous courage, addressed the citizens of London at the Guildhall, and when they rallied round her the insurrection was easily crushed.
In Mary's second Parliament the title of supreme head was formally abrogated, and an attempt was made to re-enact the statutes against heresy, but was defeated by the resistance of the Lords.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/09766a.htm   (1790 words)

  
 History of the Monarchy > The Tudors > Mary I
Mary I was the first Queen Regnant (that is, a queen reigning in her own right rather than a queen through marriage to a king).
Mary also revived the old heresy laws to secure the religious conversion of the country; heresy was regarded as a religious and civil offence amounting to treason (to believe in a different religion from the Sovereign was an act of defiance and disloyalty).
Mary's decision to marry Philip, King of Spain from 1556, in 1554 was very unpopular; the protest from the Commons prompted Mary's reply that Parliament was 'not accustomed to use such language to the Kings of England' and that in her marriage 'she would choose as God inspired her'.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page45.asp   (467 words)

  
 Mary I Of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Mary, queen of England, led persecutions of Protestants in her country and waged war on France until her death enthroned her sister Elizabeth, who redirected...
Mary I, Mary Tudor (February 18, 1516- November 17, 1558) was Queen of England (reigned July 19, 1553 - November 17, 1558) was born in the royal Palace of Placentia in Greenwich, London, the daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, the only one from that union to survive infancy.
Many scholars trace the nursery rhyme "Mary, Mary, quite contrary" to her unpopular attempts to bring Roman Catholicism back to England, identfying the "cockle shells", for example, with the symbol of pilgrimage to the shrine of Saint James in Spain and the "pretty maids all in a row" with nuns.
www.wikiverse.org /mary-i-of-england   (807 words)

  
 Queen "Bloody" Mary - Heltonville Christian Church
Queen Mary I was alienated from her father, King Henry VIII, during his divorce (it was not a divorce in the modern sense, but an annulment) from her mother.
Mary had always rejected and resented the break with Rome that her father had instituted and his subsequent establishment of the Anglican Church that had flowed from her half-brother's protestantism, and now she tried to turn England back to Roman Catholicism.
Mary I of England is often confused with her cousin "Mary, Queen of Scots", who lived at the same time.
www.heltonvillechristianchurch.org /learn/history/timeline/queen-mary.shtml   (843 words)

  
 [No title]
Mary cannot be compared to the rare exceptions of women who appeared to command their lives and those that lived around them, such as Catherine de Medici or Mary’s successor and half-sister, Elizabeth I. Even Elizabeth lived under the social constraints of the sixteenth century seeking a husband until her late forties.
Mary proclaimed to her counselors that she had every intention to restore papal jurisdiction to England.Again in September of 1553, Mary expressed her desire to return the churches of England and Ireland back to the apostolic see, as it were before her father’s interventions.
Mary’s contemporary view of gender in the sixteenth century has to be weighed when explaining why she chose to listen to the emperor and her husband.
www.augustana.edu /library/special/pole/worddocs/poleandmary.doc   (3784 words)

  
 BHC2952 : Mary I of England, 1516-58 and Philip II of Spain, ...
BHC2952 : Mary I of England, 1516-58 and Philip II of Spain,...
Mary I of England, 1516-58 and Philip II of Spain, 1527-98
Mary is seated full-length on the right, facing to the left in a fl overdress with fur on the sleeves and gold brocade embroidered underdress, with the headdress of the 1550s.
www.nmm.ac.uk /mag/pages/mnuExplore/PaintingDetail.cfm?letter=m&ID=BHC2952   (463 words)

  
 Mary I of England Biography and Summary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Mary I(18 February, 1516 – 17 November, 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553(de jure) or 19 July 1553(de facto) until her death.
Mary, the fourth and penultimate monarch of the Tudor dynast...
Mary I of England: The Princess Mary (1544)
www.bookrags.com /Mary_I_of_England   (188 words)

  
 About Mary I TUDOR (Queen of England)
Mary replied that she had never considered marriage until God had raised her to the throne but- now that she was Queen- she would lead her subjects down the path of righteousness.
Mary would most likely want to exclude Elizabeth from the throne, which meant that the crown would then fall to Mary Queen of Scots, who was about to marry the son of the King of France and was unacceptable for Spanish interests.
Mary had refused to allow Felipe and Elizabeth to meet, but in Apr when the Court moved to Hampton Court Palace Elizabeth was brought there as well (she had still been at Woodstock until then).
www.tudorplace.com.ar /aboutMary.htm   (3917 words)

  
 Queen Mary I of England - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia
The whole disaster that was Queen Mary I started when Princess Catherine of Aragon's "precious" sick betrothed Prince Arthur died, and left a "healthier" "more manly" kid brother, Henry, behind to marry.
Although Mary's existence cooled him for a while, King Henry VIII was still an evil posterity craving misogynist at heart, and his love for evil Anne, drew that quality back out.
Suddenly realizing the huge mistake he had made by marrying her, Henry ordered Anne's execution, and freed Mary from slavery, with the small compensation of having to baby-sit the vomit monster Elizapuke, who Mary is said to have considered cute before she became a threat to Mary's upcoming Queen Hood.
www.uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Queen_Mary_I_of_England   (917 words)

  
 History of Queen Mary I of England
Mary long hesitated, but at length her scruples were overcome, she issued the fatal warrant on February 8, 1554, and four days later both were executed.
MARY listened to the worst counsels of each and her distempered humour settled into a confused ferocity.
The necessity of releasing Elizabeth from the Tower was an unspeakable annoyance to Mary.
www.publicbookshelf.com /public_html/Outline_of_Great_Books_Volume_I/queenmary_ii.html   (1216 words)

  
 Mary I of England and Scotland - IBWiki
Mary I of England and Scotland - IBWiki
During the reign of Robert II of Scotland, the Scottish Crown had been confirmed to be inherited by males in the line of Robert's children - all sons - who were listed in that parliamentary act, because the legitimacy of Robert's children of first marriage were questionable.
He was jealous of Mary's friendship with her private secretary, David Rizzio, and, in March 1566 Darnley entered into a secret conspiracy with the nobles who had rebelled against Mary in the Chaseabout Raid.
ib.frath.net /w/Mary_I_of_England_and_Scotland   (390 words)

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