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Topic: Maurice Vincent Wilkes


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  Science Fair Projects - Maurice Vincent Wilkes
Maurice Vincent Wilkes (born June 26, 1913 in Dudley, Staffordshire, England) is a British computer scientist, credited with several important developments in computing.
Wilkes was called up for military service during WWII and worked in radar and operational research.
Wilkes is also credited with the idea of symbolic labels, macros, and subroutine libraries.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Maurice_Wilkes   (915 words)

  
  Maurice Vincent Wilkes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Maurice Vincent Wilkes (born June 26, 1913 in Dudley, Staffordshire, England) is a British computer scientist, credited with several important developments in computing.
Wilkes was called up for military service during WWII and worked in radar and operational research.
Wilkes is also credited with the idea of symbolic labels, macros, and subroutine libraries.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Maurice_Wilkes   (769 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Maurice Wilkes
Maurice Vincent Wilkes (born June 26, 1913 in Dudley, Staffordshire, England) is a British computer scientist.
His most famous accomplishments were the construction of the first operating stored program computer, EDSAC in June, 1949 and the invention of microprogramming, (published in IEEE Spectrum in 1955).
In 1974 Wilkes encountered a Swiss data network (at Hasler AG) that used a ring topology to allocate time on the network.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ma/Maurice_Wilkes   (578 words)

  
 Maurice V. Wilkes
Wilkes' initial brief was to supervise the construction of the new differential analyzer and visit Manchester University to gain experience on the differential analyzer there.
Wilkes was given the opportunity of one night in which to read and digest the document which described the stored program computer concept.
Wilkes jumped at the chance to go and, although he arrived late owing to post war shipping shortages, he was in time for the detailed description of the ENIAC and the discussion of the EDVAC principle.
ei.cs.vt.edu /~history/Wilkes.html   (2477 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Maurice Vincent Wilkes (born June 26, 1913 in Dudley, Staffordshire, England) is a British computer scientist.
His most famous accomplishments were the construction of the first operating stored program computer, EDSAC in June, 1949 and the invention of microprogramming, (published in IEEE Spectrum in 1955).
In 2002, Wilkes moved back to the Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, where he is currently an Emeritus Professor.
www.online-encyclopedia.info /encyclopedia/m/ma/maurice_wilkes.html   (564 words)

  
 Smart Computing Encyclopedia Entry - Wilkes, Maurice Vincent   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
According to the citation awarding him a fellowship in the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery), “Professor Wilkes is best known as the builder and designer of the EDSAC, the first computer with an internally stored program.
Wilkes stayed at Cambridge until he retired from his professorship in 1980.
Professor Wilkes has written a memoir, “Memoirs of a Computer Pioneer” (MIT Press, 1985) and several other books, the latest of which is “Computing Perspectives” (Morgan Kaufmann, 1995).
www.smartcomputing.com /editorial/dictionary/detail.asp?guid=&searchtype=&DicID=18146&RefType=Encyclopedia   (364 words)

  
 Maurice Vincent Wilkes -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Wilkes was called up for military service during (Click link for more info and facts about WWII) WWII and worked in (Measuring instrument in which the echo of a pulse of microwave radiation is used to detect and locate distant objects) radar and operational research.
Wilkes is also credited with the idea of symbolic labels, (A single computer instruction that results in a series of instructions in machine language) macros, and subroutine libraries.
In 1956 he was elected a Fellow of the (An honorary English society (formalized in 1660 and given a Royal Charter by Charles II in 1662) through which the British government has supported science) Royal Society.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/m/ma/maurice_vincent_wilkes.htm   (813 words)

  
 Wilkes, Maurice Vincent - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Wilkes, Maurice Vincent   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Wilkes was born in Dudley and studied at Cambridge.
Wilkes chose the serial mode, in which the information in the computer is processed in sequence (and not several parts at once, as in the parallel type).
This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Wilkes,+Maurice+Vincent   (265 words)

  
 Wilkes, Maurice Vincent
English mathematician who led the team at Cambridge University that built the EDSAC (electronic delay storage automatic calculator) 1949, one of the earliest of the British electronic computers.
Wilkes was born in Dudley and studied at Cambridge.
Wilkes chose the serial mode, in which the information in the computer is processed in sequence (and not several parts at once, as in the parallel type).
www.cartage.org.lb /en/themes/biographies/MainBiographies/W/Wilkes/1.html   (201 words)

  
 MAURICE VINCENT WILKES FACTS AND DATA SALES FORCE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Maurice Vincent Wilkes (born June_26, 1913 in Dudley, Staffordshire, England) is a British computer_scientist, credited with several important developments in computing.
He was appointed to a junior faculty position of the University_of_Cambridge through which he was involved in the establishment of a computing laboratory.
Later, Wilkes worked on an early timesharing systems (now termed a multi-user operating system) and distributed_computing.
www.steelonemarketing.com /Maurice_Vincent_Wilkes   (755 words)

  
 Caleah's Web Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Wilkes was appointed as University Demonstrator (closely equivalent to Assistant Professor) and was selected to supervise the construction of the new differential analyzer which would be the main equipment for the laboratory.
Wilkes left the university for war service in 1939 and worked in radar and operational research.
Maurice Wilkes personal webpage gives a short biography of himself beginning with his current position as the Director of AT&T Laboratories in Cambridge.
www.willamette.edu /~cconrad/lab0.html   (316 words)

  
 Maurice Vincent Wilkes Biography and Summary
Maurice Wilkes developed an interest in radio as a child and specialized in radar research during World War II.
After the war, Wilkes became involved in pioneering research on the development of computers and is best known for his development of EDSAC, t...
Wilkes studied at St. John's College, Cambridge from 1931 to 1934, continuing to com...
www.bookrags.com /Maurice_Vincent_Wilkes   (183 words)

  
 Read about Maurice Vincent Wilkes at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Maurice Vincent Wilkes and learn about Maurice ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
University of Cambridge through which he was involved in the establishment of a computing laboratory.
Wilkes was called up for military service during
Algol, and contributed to the development of Algol 68, the most advanced standard form of Algol.
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Maurice_Wilkes   (727 words)

  
 Maurice Vincent Wilkes Details, Meaning Maurice Vincent Wilkes Article and Explanation Guide
Maurice Vincent Wilkes Details, Meaning Maurice Vincent Wilkes Article and Explanation Guide
Maurice Vincent Wilkes Guide, Meaning, Facts, Information and Description
This is an Article on Maurice Vincent Wilkes.
www.e-paranoids.com /m/ma/maurice_vincent_wilkes.html   (807 words)

  
 The EDSAC
The development of EDSAC was largely due to the efforts of the English computer scientist Maurice Vincent Wilkes.
However, the memory storage of EDSAC, like the American EDVAC, was to be constructed of mercury delay lines (long, sealed tubes, filled with mercury, which represented data as ripples in the mercury).
After the crucial challenge of the delay lines had been met, Wilkes forged ahead with construction of the entire computer, and by early 1949 EDSAC was ready for operational testing.
www.calculi.nl /page100.html   (334 words)

  
 STMsubtypes-pt3
There were 28 officially named attendees, including Maurice Vincent Wilkes (Cambridge), and Bletchley Park's Irving J. ("Jack") Good and D. Rees (both by then at the University of Manchester), and they were taught by experts drawn from the Harvard and Moore School teams.
By December 1946, things had got so bad that the NPL directors called upon one of the delegates to the Moore summer school, Cambridge's Maurice Wilkes, for an opinion on the project's viability, and he wisely suggested that a scaled down version of the system be put together to test the basics (Wilkes, 1946).
Wilkes is often credited with the invention of "Assembly Code", the generic name for software which translates human-readable instructions into machine instructions [more on this in Part 4 (Section 3.2)].
www.smithsrisca.demon.co.uk /STMsubtypes-pt3.html   (16341 words)

  
 Maurice Vincent Wilkes - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
In 1980 he retired from his professorships and post as the Directorate of the laboratory and joined the central engineering staff of Digital Equipment Corp. in Maynard, Massachusetts.
Memoirs of a Computer Pioneer (History of Computing)
Contemporary Authors : Biography - Wilkes, Maurice (Vincent) (1913-)
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /maurice_wilkes.htm   (775 words)

  
 MAURICE WILKES Articles Maurice Vincent Wilkes (born June 2
MAURICE WILKES Articles Maurice Vincent Wilkes (born June 2
Wilkes was called up for military service during WWII and worked on radar at the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), and in operational research.
Showing 1 to 0 of 0 Articles matching 'Maurice Wilkes' in related articles.
www.amazines.com /Maurice_Wilkes_related.html   (407 words)

  
 Computer: looking.back
Ironically, although John Vincent Atanasoff of the Iowa State College (later University) had failed to file for a patent on his ABC machine, it was nevertheless the discussions between Mauchly and Atanasoff that eventually led the District Court in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to invalidate the ENIAC patent.
Maurice Vincent Wilkes, born June 26, 1913, was director of the Cambridge Computer Laboratory throughout the development of stored-program computers, starting with EDSAC.
Wilkes received an IEEE Computer Society Pioneer Award in 1980.
www.indwes.edu /faculty/bcupp/lookback/hist-06.htm   (949 words)

  
 "W" Famous People
Wilkes, Charles (1798-1877) US naval officer, born in New York City, USA.
Wilkes, Sir Maurice (Vincent) (1913-) Computer scientist, born in Dudley, West Midlands, C England, UK.
Wilkins, Maurice (Hugh Frederick) (1916-) Biophysicist, born in Pongaroa, New Zealand.
www.jonathanselby.com /Wfam   (12453 words)

  
 Cambridge University Engineering Department   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
In 1812 Charles Babbage, while an undergraduate at Cambridge, had his first ideas for a calculating machine and later started work on his 'difference engine', which he never completed but which heralded later inventions leading to the modern computer.
Historical links between Cambridge University and the birth of computer sciences continued through the appointment of Maurice Vincent Wilkes as Director of the Cambridge Computer Laboratory, where he was responsible for the development of stored program computers starting with EDSAC.
He was also the inventor of labels, macros and microprogramming, and with David Wheeler and Stanley Gill, the inventor of a programming system based on subroutines.
www-h.eng.cam.ac.uk /admissions/meng/ice/history.html   (221 words)

  
 1955   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Maurice Wilkes publishes a description of microprogramming in IEEE Spectrum.
Saturday, November 5, 1955 - This is the date Marty McFly arrived in 1955 in the film Back to the Future.
November 5 - Maurice Utrillo, a "Montmartre" artist
www.bidprobe.com /en/wikipedia/1/19/1955.html   (837 words)

  
 Sir Maurice (Vincent) Wilkes Biography - Biography.com
He studied at Cambridge, directed the Mathematical (later Computer) Laboratory at Cambridge (1946–80), and became known for his pioneering work with the EDSAC (Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator).
Around this machine, operational and providing a computing service from May 1949, Wilkes built the world's first computing service.
Visit our special exhibit sites for info, activities, and more!
www.biography.com /search/article.jsp?aid=9531463   (98 words)

  
 Events and Sightings Web Extras
Part of the problem with the British case for primacy is the excessive and lasting government secrecy on wartime and post-war computer development in the UK which has greatly limited historical knowledge about the Colossus and other early machines.
MEMORIES OF A COMPUTER PIONEER by Maurice Wilkes (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press “History of Computing,” 1985—$35.00, ISBN 0-262-23122-0, 237 pp., photos, index) is the autobiography of a British computer engineer who helped in the early 1950s to build the EDSAC, the first stored program digital computer to go into service.
Wilkes retired from Cambridge in 1980, and became a consulting engineer at Digital Equipment Corporation in Massachusetts as well as an adjunct professor at MIT.
www.computer.org /portal/site/annals/menuitem.8933248930f8c11dbe1fbe108bcd45f3/index.jsp?&pName=annals_level1&path=annals/articles/xtras/a2-2005&file=bibliography_hw.xml&xsl=article.xsl&   (8370 words)

  
 ENIAC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
With the outbreak of the war, work began to pile up, and in June 1942, the Ordnance Department contracted with Moore School to operate its somewhat faster Bush differential analyzer exclusively for the Army.
Mauchly had come to Penn shortly after his 1941 visit with John Vincent Atanasoff at Iowa State College to discuss the latter's work on an electronic computer.
In the fall of 1942, Mauchly wrote a memorandum, sketching his concept of an electronic computer, developed in consultation with Eckert.
www.bishops.k12.nf.ca /ct3200/eniac.html   (1449 words)

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