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Topic: Maurine Dallas Watkins


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In the News (Tue 19 Mar 19)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Maurine Dallas Watkins
Maurine Dallas Watkins (July 27, 1896 - August 10, 1969) was an American journalist and playwright.
Watkins' played up the "sob-sister" aspects of both cases and her coverage may well have played a role in the not guilty verdicts both obtained.
Watkins did some reporting on the Leopold and Loeb case, which quickly overshadowed the coverage of the Belvah Gaertner verdict, but she soon left journalism to take up playwrighting, studying under George Pierce Baker at Yale University.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ma/Maurine_Dallas_Watkins   (1127 words)

  
 News - Classical Languages - Sewanee :: The University of the South
William Thiele Blackerby of Birmingham, Alabama, and a sophomore major in the Department of Classical Languages at the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee, has placed in the 2007 Eta Sigma Phi Maurine Dallas Watkins Sight Translation Contests.
Blackerby was Andrew Gregg ('05), who received a national award in the Maurine Dallas Watkins Advanced Latin Translation contest in 2005.
In recent years' Maurine Dallas Watkins Translation Contests, Andrew Gregg ('05) won third prize in the Advanced Latin Translation out of 59 entries.
www.sewanee.edu /classics/class/news   (2151 words)

  
  Chicago (musical)
The play Chicago was Watkins' retelling of two very public trials for murder that occurred in Chicago in 1924, those of Beulah Annan and Belva Gaertner.
Watkins had been a reporter for the Chicago Tribune and later wrote a play based on her coverage.
Fosse approached Watkins for permission to adapt her play but was consistently refused.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ch/Chicago_(musical).html   (546 words)

  
  Maurine Dallas Watkins   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Maurine Dallas Watkins (July 27, 1896 - August 10, 1969) was an American journalist and playwright.
Watkins' played up the "sob-sister" aspects of both cases and her coverage may well have played a role in the not guilty verdicts both obtained.
Watkins did some reporting on the Leopold and Loeb case, which quickly overshadowed the coverage of the Belvah Gaertner verdict, but she soon left journalism to take up playwrighting, studying under George Pierce Baker at Yale University.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/maurine_dallas_watkins   (1176 words)

  
 Crime reporter found 'Chicago' on her beat - MOVIES - Los Angeles Times - calendarlive.com
Maurine Dallas Watkins drew from murder cases she covered to write the play upon which the hit musical is based.
Watkins was born in Louisville, Ky., in 1896, attended high school in Crawfordsville, Ind., went to college at Butler University and went to graduate school at Radcliffe College.
Watkins went on to a spluttering Hollywood career as a screenwriter, never again reaching the heights of "Chicago." She routinely denied permission to anyone who wanted to buy the rights to her play.
www.calendarlive.com /printedition/calendar/cl-et-jones10jan10,0,2793012.story?coll=cl-calendar   (609 words)

  
 Maurine Dallas Watkins at AllExperts
Watkins' played up the "sob-story" aspects of both cases and her coverage may well have played a role in the not guilty verdicts both obtained.
Watkins did some reporting on the Leopold and Loeb case, which quickly overshadowed the coverage of the Belvah Gaertner verdict, but she soon left journalism to take up playwrighting, studying under George Pierce Baker at Yale University.
By the 1950s Watkins consistently refused permission for new productions of Chicago: some speculated that she felt some shame for her role in getting two killers found not guilty of murder: others felt that she was tired of being known as the author of only that one play.
en.allexperts.com /e/m/ma/maurine_dallas_watkins.htm   (1205 words)

  
 Transylvania University   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Maurine Dallas Watkins probably wouldn’t have been surprised at all the hoopla surrounding the 2002 Academy Award-winning movie Chicago.
After all, it was her fertile imagination that gave the world the original Chicago in 1926, a satirical play that has been the basis for all the stage and movie versions that have appeared since then.
Watkins, a Louisville native, was a student at both Transylvania and Hamilton College, a junior college affiliated with Transy, from 1914-17.
www.transy.edu /people/content/features4.asp-shell-about-object-people   (648 words)

  
 Chicago (1927 movie)
The movie Chicago was produced by Cecil B. DeMille in 1927 and directed by Frank Urson[?].
It was drawn from a play by Maurine Dallas Watkins which was in turn based on the true crime story of Beulah Annan, fictionalized as "Roxie Hart" (played by Phyllis Haver[?]), her fellow death-row inmate Belva Gaertner, and their spectacular involvement in the murder of their boyfriends.
The Watkins play was again filmed in 1942 as Roxie Hart[?], starring Ginger Rogers (in the title role), and Adolphe Menjou as Billy Flynn.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ch/Chicago_(1927_movie).html   (104 words)

  
 Maurine Dallas Watkins -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
She was born in (Click link for more info and facts about Louisville, Kentucky) Louisville, Kentucky and attended Crawfordsville High School and (Click link for more info and facts about Radcliffe College) Radcliffe College.
She journeyed to (The film industry of the United States) Hollywood to write screenplays (it is generally felt her best was (Click link for more info and facts about Libelled Lady) Libelled Lady).
In 1947, the story was made into a vehicle for (United States dancer and film actress who partnered with Fred Astaire (born 1911)) Ginger Rogers and filmed as Roxie Hart - reversed, this time, with Roxie confessing to a murder which she did not commit.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/m/ma/maurine_dallas_watkins.htm   (1121 words)

  
 [potter-l] Chicago: DP's influence lives on.
Watkins had based her play on a murder case she had covered when she was a cub reporter for the Chicago Tribune.
When Fosse approached Watkins about adapting her play as a musical, she wasn't interested.
I speculate that since Maurine had to supply a full-length play in order to be accepted into Prof.
www.engage.nu /pipermail/potter-l/2003-March/000367.html   (746 words)

  
 Dallas Dui Attorney
The two lawyers, William Scott Stewart and W. O'Brien, and Maurine Dallas Watkins was assigned to cover the trial.
Maurine Dallas Watkins was assigned the sob sister stories.
Watkins played up the exciting aspects of both cases and her coverage may well have played a role in getting two killers found not guilty verdicts both obtained.
attorneydallas.2vv1.com /dallasduiattorney.html   (982 words)

  
 mental_floss library   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
In 1924, Maurine Dallas Watkins was a reporter for the Chicago Tribune newspaper.
Beulah Annan was described by Watkins as the "prettiest woman on Murderess Row," and Belva Gaertner was dubbed the "most stylish." The reporting had a great deal to do with the public impression of the two women and likely assisted in both of them ultimately being exonerated of the crimes for which they were accused.
Maurine Watkins eventually left Chicago and moved to New York City.
www.mentalfloss.com /archives/archive2004-03-17.htm   (335 words)

  
 Nuntius Volume 77 Spring 2003 Number 2 Page 1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
On her death in 1969, Eta Sigma Phi received a bequest of $10,000, which became the seed money of the endowment which supports the summer scholarships, and her name was given to the translation contests.
Watkins later pursued graduate work at Radcliffe, studying playwriting under George Pierce Baker, America’s foremost teacher in the field at the time.
After the trials, Watkins moved to New York, where she worked as an editor and continued to study playwriting under Baker, then at the newly formed Yale School of Drama.
people.hsc.edu /organizations/etasigmaphi/03spring   (604 words)

  
 Chicago (1927 film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Chicago is a 1927 silent film produced by Cecil B. DeMille and directed by Frank Urson.
It was drawn from a play by Maurine Dallas Watkins which was in turn based on the true crime story of Beulah Annan, fictionalized as "Roxie Hart" (played by Phyllis Haver), her fellow death-row inmate Belva Gaertner, and their spectacular involvement in the murder of their boyfriends.
The Watkins play was again filmed in 1942 as Roxie Hart, starring Ginger Rogers (in the title role), and Adolphe Menjou as Billy Flynn.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Chicago_(1927_movie)   (138 words)

  
 New York Lawyer
Here's how Watkins covered the story: Belva told her "No woman can love a man who "tried to make love" to her.
Watkins did some reporting on the show What's Happening 21 Elliott Smith, US musician, 34 years 21 Louise Day Hicks, US politician 21 Fred Berry, American actor, 84 years 19 Michael Hegstrand, "Road Warrior Hawk", 46 years 19 Faith Fancher, television journalist and playwright.
Maurine Dallas Watkins Maurine Dallas Watkins was assigned to cover the trial.
attorneydallas.2vv1.com /newyorklawyer.html   (461 words)

  
 Epicentre Theatre Company   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Watkins opens this comedy with a brutal dramatization of the same situation the women in her articles faced: a vengeful Roxie has slain her lover for mistreating her.
It wasn’t until after her death in 1969 that Bob Fosse, John Kander and Fred Ebb were given the go-ahead to do an adaptation of the play.
Many people familiar with the origins of the Roxie Hart character know that Roxie is based on the real-life woman Beulah Annan, who shot her lover in 1924 but was acquitted of the crime.
www.epicentretheatre.org.au /shows/chicago/chicago.html   (491 words)

  
 Definition of index.php?search=Dallas|Cowboys&limit=20&offset=60
Dallas skyline as seen from north of Woodall Rodgers Fre...
Dallas County]] and small portions of the city also exte...
5: Dallas County was established on [[February 9]], [[1818]...
www.wordiq.com /knowledge/index.php?search=Dallas%7CCowboys&limit=20&offset=60   (590 words)

  
 Chicago   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Among the hacks was a young Chicago reporter, Maurine Dallas Watkins, a woman who was to help change the story from a grubby little killing to a source of fascination to this day.
Maurine Dallas Watkins dutifully reported the events and made clear the farce that Beulah made of the trial, but her interest didn't stop there.
She entered Yale on a course of Play Writing and shortly after appeared in New York with a script.
www.orpheus-theatre.on.ca /shows/chicago/main.html   (508 words)

  
 Maurine Dallas Watkins - Definition up Erdmond.Com
Watkins did some reporting on the Leopold_and_Loeb case, which quickly overshadowed the coverage of the Belvah Gaertner verdict, but she soon left journalism to take up playwrighting, studying under George_Pierce_Baker at Yale_University.
In 1913, near Watkin's hometown of Crawfordsville,_Indiana, a man named Walter Runyan shot and killed Arlie Stull to stop him from telling Walter's wife that Walter was having an affair -- with a woman named Roxie Hart!
In 1947, the story was made into a vehicle for Ginger_Rogers and filmed as ''Roxie Hart'' - reversed, this time, with Roxie confessing to a murder which she did not commit.
www.erdmond.com /Maurine_Dallas_Watkins.html   (1035 words)

  
 Girls & Guns - The New York Review of Books
Bob Fosse was given a copy of the 1926 Maurine Dallas Watkins play Chicago in 1963, by his then wife, the actress and dancer Gwen Verdon.
Watkins had based her play on a murder case she had covered when she was a cub reporter for the Chicago Tribune.
When Fosse approached Watkins about adapting her play as a musical, she wasn't interested.
www.nybooks.com /articles/16152   (3282 words)

  
 Nuntius Page 2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
While it is unclear what happened to the eighth, Watkins biographer John Elliott suggests it may have been reserved by the publisher, William Randolph Hearst, for use in a future film.
Considering the economic environment during the ’20s and ’30s, when Watkins was writing most prolifically, it is amazing she built an estate estimated at more than $2 million before her death in 1969.
Watkins’ life-long interests in classical studies and creative writing set the stage for her philanthropic interests.
people.hsc.edu /organizations/etasigmaphi/03spring/nuntius2.html   (378 words)

  
 Definition of index.php?search=Dallas&limit=20&offset=40   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
11:...tion in southwest Dallas as a result of the local Dallas Baptist Association's desire for a local baptist...
1: '''Dallas Township''' is a [[civil townshiptownship]] loca...
The area is contiguous with the Dallas Design District, so much of the area conveys a ve...
www.wordiq.com /knowledge/index.php?search=Dallas&limit=20&offset=40   (519 words)

  
 Chicago tickets - tickets for Chicago at the Cambridge Theatre - London theatre tickets and information
In 1924, Watkins popularised the concept of 'celebrity criminal' when she covered the murder trials of Beulah May Annan and cabaret singer Belva Gaertner.
Both were acquitted through the hard work of their defence lawyers, even though the circumstances and evidence surrounding the cases might have suggested a different verdict.
Watkins' column in the Chicago Tribune became so popular during the time of the trials that she decided to write a play documenting them.
www.theatretickets.co.uk /559/Chicago.html   (633 words)

  
 Chicago Tickets - Buy Chicago Theater Tickets
The musical itself is based on the novel Chicago by Maurine Dallas Watkins, who was a reporter that covered the murder trials of two women for the Chicago Tribune.
Her column was so popular that she decided to write a play, and it made it all the way to Broadway.
The musical Chicago on tour in the United States brings this show of treachery, adultery and the pageantry that was the justice system in the '40s to local venues across the nation.
www.theaterticketbargains.com /shows/chicago-tickets.html   (382 words)

  
 Blogs - Dallas.Org: Dallas News and Information
In what may underscore Mayor Tom Leppert's frustration with Dallas City Council Member Angela Hunt, and her petition to restrict a high-speed tollroad down the middle of the Trinity River, Leppert has tossed Hunt from all city committee leadership positions.
On the heels of the revelation that even revising reporting methods won't help soften Dallas' position as the most crime-ridden major city in America, has come a dramatic rise in residential burglaries in Northeast Dallas.
Bright and early Tuesday morning, Dallas Mayor Tom Leppert announced that the city attorney was sending a bunch of signatures to the District Attorney because of suspected fraud.
www.dallas.org /blog   (2113 words)

  
 Chicago
The play was soon made into a silent movie also called Chicago in 1927 and later into a cleaned-up by the censor-office sound movie called Roxie Hart in 1942, starring Ginger Rogers in the title role.
However, in the intervening years, Watkins had a change of heart about her source newspaper articles possibly helping guilty women escape punishment and refused to sell the rights to her play.
So Chicago was all but forgotten for the next two decades until after Watkins’ death, when Fosse was finally able to buy the rights to Chicago from Watkins’ heirs.
home.earthlink.net /~forrestrice/id17.html   (1603 words)

  
 ☞ research - maurine dallas watkins - maurine dallas watkins online guide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Dallas A city of northeast Texas on the Trinity River east of Fort Worth.
Based on the play by Maurine Dallas Watkins ; Original orchestrations by Ralph Burns ; Dance arrangements by Peter Howard ; Script adaptation by David Thompson Directed by Walter Bobbie ; Choreographed in...
Based on a play by Maurine Dallas Watkins, the story is set in Chicago in the 1930s, when vaudeville theaters were filled with freakish...
www.4webreference.info /watkins/maurine-dallas-watkins.html   (510 words)

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