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Topic: Max Noether


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In the News (Sun 18 Aug 19)

  
  MAX NOETHER   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Max Noether was born in Mannheim to a family long engaged in a wholesale hardware business.
In 1880 Max Noether married Ida Amalia Kaufmann.
Max Noether is remembered as one of the founders of algebraic geometry.
faculty.evansville.edu /ck6/bstud/mnoether.html   (374 words)

  
 Against the odds
Hilbert and Felix Klein persuaded Emmy Noether to come to Göttingen and then embarked on a long campaign to have her appointed to a faculty position in spite of the Prussian law passed in 1908 which prohibited this.
In 1922 Noether was appointed to the position of "unofficial, extraordinary professor", in effect, a volunteer professor without pay or official status and she was later granted a tiny salary which was barely at subsistence level.
Noether published what is generally known as her most important paper, "Theory of Ideals in Rings" in 1921 which was of fundamental importance in the development of modern algebra.
www.pass.maths.org.uk /issue12/features/noether/index.html   (1120 words)

  
 [No title]
Emmy Noether's father Max Noether was a distinguished mathematician and a professor at Erlangen.
Emmy Amalie Noether was born on March 23rd 1882 to a middle class Jewish family in the small Bavarian town of Erlangen.
Her father, Max Noether, was a distinguished professor of mathematics at the University of Erlangen.
www.lycos.com /info/emmy-noether.html   (485 words)

  
 noether
Noether obtained permission to sit in on courses at the University of Erlangen during 1900 to 1902.
Noether also worked on her own research, in particular she was influenced by Fischer who had succeeded Gordan in 1911.
Emmy Noether's first piece of work when she arrived in G?ttingen in 1915 is a result in theoretical physics sometimes referred to as Noether's Theorem, which proves a relationship between symmetries in physics and conservation principles.
library.thinkquest.org /C006364/ENGLISH/mathematician/noether.htm   (954 words)

  
 Noether_Max biography
Max Noether suffered an attack of polio when he was 14 years old and it left him with a handicap for the rest of his life.
Max Noether was one of the leaders of nineteenth century
Following Cremona, Max Noether studied the invariant properties of an algebraic variety under the action of birational transformations.
www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk /history/Biographies/Noether_Max.html   (164 words)

  
 KOVALEVSKY, S.(1850-1891) and NOETHER, A.E.(1882-1935)
Amalie Emmy Noether, one of the most outstanding mathematicians in the field of abstract algebra, was born in Erlangen, Germany, in 1882.
His influence on Noether was great, and under his direction, her preoccupation passed From the algorithmic aspect of Gordan's work to the abstract axiomatic approach of Hilbert.
Although Noether was a poor lecturer and lacked pedagogical skill, she managed to inspire a surprising number of students who also left marks in the field of abstract algebra.
library.thinkquest.org /22584/temh3005.htm   (826 words)

  
 Emmy Noether Summary
Noether, better known by her nickname of Emmy, had originally planned to be a teacher of English and French, but she changed her career plans to follow in the footsteps of her well-respected father, Max Noether, then a professor of mathematics at the University of Erlanger.
Noether is remembered both for her brilliant mathematical ability and her determination to overcome sexual and racial discrimination.
Noether was born on March 23, 1882, in Erlangen, Germany, the daughter of Max and Ida Kaufmann Noether.
www.bookrags.com /Emmy_Noether   (6514 words)

  
 Siamak Yassemi
Noether, and all women in Germany, were given the right to vote for the first time.
Noether's teaching method led her students to come up with ideas of their own, and many went on to become great mathematicians themselves.
Noether's death in 1935 surprised nearly everyone, as she had told only her closest friends of her illness.
www.fos.ut.ac.ir /~yassemi/emmy.htm   (1131 words)

  
 Emmy Noether
Emmy Noether was born in Erlangen, Germany on March 23, 1882.
Her father was Max Noether, a noted mathematician of his time.
Noether was a warm person who cared deeply about her students.
www.agnesscott.edu /lriddle/women/noether.htm   (1240 words)

  
 Emmy Noether: Creative Mathematical Genius
Her father Max was a math professor at the University of Erlangen.
Noether was only allowed to lecture under Hilbert's name, as his assistant.
Noether's conceptual approach to algebra led to a body of principles unifying algebra, geometry, linear algebra, topology, and logic.
www.sdsc.edu /ScienceWomen/noether.html   (559 words)

  
 EMMY NOETHER   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
She was born in the German university town of Erlangen, where her father, Max Noether, was a professor of mathematics.
Noether came to the United States in 1933, where she taught at Bryn Mawr College near Philadelphia and lectured at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.
Emmy Noether's name is known to many physicists through Noether's Theorem, described by Peter G. Bergmann as a cornerstone of work in general relativity as well as in certain aspects of elementary particles physics.
faculty.evansville.edu /ck6/bstud/noether.html   (556 words)

  
 Biography of Noeth   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
D in 1907 from the University of Erlangen, her publications helped her gain popularity--she was elected to the Circolo Matematico di Palermo, she was invited to become a member of the Deutsche Mathematiker Vereinigung and was also invited to address and lecture in many places.
Emmy Noether was best known for her contributions to abstract algebra, such as...
She is known to many mathematicians largely in connection with the adjective "noetherian," which applies in ring theory to properties associated with ascending chains of subrings.
www.andrews.edu /~calkins/math/biograph/bionoeth.htm   (820 words)

  
 Biography of Emmy Amalie Noether   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Emmy Amalie Noether was born on March 23, 1882 in Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany.
D in 1907, her publications helped her gain popularity--she was elected to the Circolo Matematico di Palermo, she was invited to become a member of the Deutsche Mathematiker Vereinigung and was also invited to address and lecture in many places.
Emmy Noether was best known for her contributions to abstract algebra, in particular, her study of chain conditions on the ideals of rings and her attention to groups and fields.
www.andrews.edu /~calkins/math/biograph/199899/BIONOETH.HTM   (753 words)

  
 Article by JD   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Emmy’s father, Max Noether, was a professor of mathematics in the south-German town of Erlangen, just north of Nuremberg.
Noether duly arrived at Göttingen, and within a matter of months produced a brilliant paper resolving one of the knottier issues in General Relativity.
Noether did not at all conform to the standards of femininity current in that time and place — nor, it has to be said in fairness to her colleagues, any other time and place.
olimu.com /webjournalism/Texts/Commentary/EmmyNoether.htm   (1566 words)

  
 Emmy Amalie Noether   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Noether obtained permission to sit in on courses at the University of Erlangen from 1900 to 1902, and the University of Göttingen from 1902 to 1903.
However this route was not open to women so Noether remained at Erlangen, helping her father.
After 1919, Noether moved away from invariant theory to work on ideal theory, producing an abstract theory which helped develop ring theory into a major mathematical topic.
www.stetson.edu /~efriedma/periodictable/html/No.html   (602 words)

  
 Emmy Noether (1882 1935)
Emmy Noether's father, Max Noether, was a mathematician at Erlangen.
In the judgement of the most competent living mathematicians, Fräulein Noether was the most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began.
Emmy Noether's name is perpetuated as the name for a ring in which every (ascending) chain of ideals is finite, as it is demonstrably in the case of Z.
www.amt.canberra.edu.au /noether.html   (951 words)

  
 The Mother of Abstract Algebra (Emmy Noether)
Amalie `Emmy' Noether was born in Erlangen Germany on March 23, 1882 and was the eldest of four children.
Her father, Max Noether, was a professor of Mathematics at the University of Erlangen.
Her colleagues called her ``the most creative abstract algebraist in the world.'' Emmy Noether brought much to the mathematical world with her work in algebra and in the development of axiomatic theory.
www.mathnews.uwaterloo.ca /BestOf/WomenInMath6906.html   (647 words)

  
 Emmy Noether   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Her father Max Noether was a distinguished algebraic geometer.
Emmy Noether was an exceptional woman; caring, compassionate and utterly unselfish possessing a love for life.
Emmy Noether was a catalyst, actively influencing those around her.
www.math.sfu.ca /histmath/Europe/20thCenturyAD/Emmy.html   (907 words)

  
 Women and Mathematics May Contest
Her father, Max Noether, was an accomplished mathematician and held a position as professor at the University of Erlangen.
For two years, Emmy Noether sat in on lectures as an auditor, and with the permission of her professors, she was able to take the matriculation examination in July of 1903.
After a semester at the University of Göttingen, where she attended lectures by prominent mathematicians, including Hilbert and Klein, Emmy Noether returned to Erlangen to study for her doctorate in mathematics which she received in 1907.
www.pims.math.ca /education/2001/women/sep   (1299 words)

  
 Max Noether Summary
Noether's daughter, Emmy, followed in Noether's footsteps, conducting researches into many of the same areas of mathematics and developing general formulations of some of his more important results.
Noether was physically handicapped his entire life due to an attack of polio as a youth.
Max Noether at the MacTutor History of Mathematics archive.
www.bookrags.com /Max_Noether   (126 words)

  
 Emmy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Her father, Max Noether, was a professor of mathematics at Erlangen.
Noether's work was fundamental, generating many ideas which continue to suggest research problems of great importance.
She is considered to be the most influential woman mathematician of the early twentieth century and the greatest mathematician up to her time.
www.roma.unisa.edu.au /07305/emmy.htm   (375 words)

  
 EMMY NOETHER Outstanding Mathematician   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The only daughter of the distinguished mathematician and Erlangen University professor Max Noether first tended towards languages and took an exam for teaching French and English (1900).
In recognition of her outstanding mathematical contributions, especially in the development of modern algebra, Emmy Noether achieved numerous honours.
Emmy Noether was a very committed teacher and she always was prepared to give full support to her students.
www.cosy.sbg.ac.at /~jpfalz/ENOETHER.html   (276 words)

  
 The Heritage of Emmy Noether - Book   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Max Noether, her father was a professor of
Emmy Noether started via Fischer who replaced Gordan after his retirement.
In 1916 she moved to Gottingen which was a greater mathematical center.
www.cs.biu.ac.il /~eni/book_on_emmy.html   (814 words)

  
 [No title]
After further study of English and French, in 1900 she became a certificated teacher of English and French in Bavarian girls schools.
At the University of Erlangen, where Max Noether was a Professor of Mathematics, and where his daughter Emmy received her Ph.D., the "invariant king," Paul Gordan, retired in 1910.
As Emmy Noether had recently written her dissertation under Gordan's direction, it was natural that she continued working along the same lines as Gordan's successor, Fischer.
www.lycos.com /info/emmy-noether--max-noether.html   (197 words)

  
 NOETHER.NET --> information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Some inquiries are related to a woman named Emmy (Emmilia Amalie) Noether.
She is a person well known for her efforts and findings on the field of mathematics and physics.
The only thing I know about her family is her fathers name - Max Noether.
www.noether.net /english.html   (200 words)

  
 Emmy Amalie Noether   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Amalie Emmy Noether was born on March 23, 1882 in Erlangen, Bavaria, in Germany and she died on April 14, 1935 in Bryn Mavr, Pennsylvania, in the U.S.A. Her father, Max Noether, was a distinqueshed mathematician.
At her death, in 1935, Einstein volunteered to write her obituary.
A crater Noether, on the moon, was named after Amalie.
warrensburg.k12.mo.us /math/emmy/ali.html   (315 words)

  
 Amazon.com: "Emmy Noether": Key Phrase page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Emmy Noether, then an established mathematician, and also, to work with Noether, the young Taussky Todd-the women whose lives bracket this...
Werke, edited by Emmy Noether, R. Fricke, and Oystein Ore....
"Maria Gactana Agncsi," "Sophie Germain," "Hypatia," "Sonia Kovalevsky," "Amalie Emmy Noether," "Max Noether," "Duncan McLaren Young Som- merville." In Dictionary of Scientific Biography, edited by Charles Coulston Gillispic.
www.amazon.com /phrase/Emmy-Noether   (514 words)

  
 Max Planck Society - Junior Research Groups
Since 1969 the Max Planck Society has been supporting gifted, young scientists and researchers through its Independent Junior Research Groups, which run for a limited period of time.
Chromosome Segregation and Mitosis (Stemmann, Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Emmy Noether)
Cell biology of virus infection (Grünewald, Department of Structural Biology, Emmy Noether)
www.mpg.de /english/institutesProjectsFacilities/jrgChoice   (141 words)

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