Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Medical ethics


Related Topics

In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Buddhist Bioethics
The principal issues to be addressed in contemporary medical ethics may be summarised as moral personhood (the question of who is and who is not entitled to moral respect), abortion, embryo experimentation, genetic engineering, consent to treatment, resource allocation, defining death, organ transplantation, living wills, the persistent vegetative state, and euthanasia.
There are signs, however, that a Buddhist perspective on certain aspects of medical treatment is beginning to appear, for example Epstein (1993) and Kabat-Zinn's (1990, 1994) integration of Buddhist meditation into medical practice, and the growing literature on Buddhism and social justice, such as Jones (1989) and Sizemore and Swearer (1993).
Personhood is both a central problem for Buddhist ethics and Western medical ethics, and consequently a very promising area for a dialogue between the two.
www.changesurfer.com /Bud/BudBioEth.html   (4426 words)

  
 "Medical Ethics" by William Ruddick
Whether physicians, philosophers, or theologians, most medical ethicists are primarily based in medical schools and teaching hospitals, and their principal audiences are (apart from one another) medical students and residents.
In most medical schools, there is little appetite for such abstract matters, and too little curricular time to convince students and clinical co-teachers of their relevance to the pressing clinical issues and cases at hand.
Criticisms and defenses of the canonical medical ethics principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice.
www.nyu.edu /gsas/dept/philo/faculty/ruddick/papers/medethics.html   (2118 words)

  
  Medical Ethics Information on Healthline
Medical ethics refers to the discussion and application of moral values and responsibilities in the areas of medical practice and research.
In Judaism, medical ethics is rooted in the study of specific case histories interpreted in the light of Jewish law.
The eighteenth century in Europe witnessed a number of medical as well as general scientific advances, and the application of scientific principles to medical education led to a new interest in medical ethics.
www.healthline.com /galecontent/medical-ethics   (829 words)

  
 Catholic Physician's Guild of Chicago: Medical Ethics
Medical ethics, the application of moral principles to healthcare situations has been more straight forward than the complex evolving discipline that has been described above.
The ethic that guided physicians for 2500 years: the beneficence ethic, arose from Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics in which the good life of man was the result of his development of virtues or habits of correct behavior.
Modern science is forcing traditional medical ethics to confront the dilemma of utilitarian ethics and to realize that it is inherently flawed.
www.cathmsa.org /chicago/MedicalEthics.html   (768 words)

  
 American Psychiatric Association
This addendum to the The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry was approved by the Board of Trustees in March 1997 and by the Assembly of District Branches in May 1997.
Occasionally a chair of an ethics committee remains in that position for several years, and it would be unwise for him or her to be not only the initial recipient of complaints but also the recipient of charges of member harassment or complaint suppression.
Answer: If the ethics committee decides to proceed, the member may object because he or she might fear that information produced at the ethics hearing could be subpoenaed for the trial, although the district branch would be advised to use all legal means to resist the subpoena.
www.psych.org /psych_pract/ethics/medicalethics2001_42001.cfm   (11812 words)

  
 The Bioethics of the Circumcision of Male Children
Medical ethics requires doctors provide all material information to patients or their proxy representatives prior to obtaining consent for a surgical procedure.
The current practice of the medical community is to obtain permission from a parent for circumcision of a child.
Since reasonable and competent adults would normally refuse to give consent to medically unnecessary interventions (especially those that alter normal appearance and/or function), it must be assumed that children would also refuse if they had the capacity to understand their situation, formulate their wishes, and express them.
www.cirp.org /library/ethics   (2606 words)

  
 bioethics.net :: Medical Ethics and the Interrogation of Guantanamo 063
bioethics.net :: Medical Ethics and the Interrogation of Guantanamo 063
Medical Ethics and the Interrogation of Guantanamo 063
medical community would express its accountability to international law and be able to call upon foreign governments and medical communities to do likewise.
www.bioethics.net /journal/j_articles.php?aid=1140   (4088 words)

  
 A/RES/37/194. Principles of medical ethics
Adopts the "Principles of Medical Ethics relevant to the role of health personnel, particularly physicians, in the protection of prisoners and detainees against torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment" annexed to the present resolution; 2.
Principle 2 It is a gross contravention of medical ethics, as well as an offence under applicable international instruments, for health personnel, particularly physicians, to engage, actively or passively, in acts which constitute participation in, complicity in, incitement to or attempts to commit torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.
Principle 3 It is a contravention of medical ethics for health personnel, particularly physicians, to be involved in any professional relationship with prisoners or detainees the purpose of which is not solely to evaluate, protect or improve their physical and mental health.
www.un.org /documents/ga/res/37/a37r194.htm   (315 words)

  
 American Medical Association: Principles of Medical Ethics
The medical profession has long subscribed to a body of ethical statements developed primarily for the benefit of the patient.
A physician shall uphold the standards of professionalism, be honest in all professional interactions, and strive to report physicians deficient in character or competence, or engaging in fraud or deception, to appropriate entities.
A physician shall, in the provision of appropriate patient care, except in emergencies, be free to choose whom to serve, with whom to associate, and the environment in which to provide medical care.
www.cirp.org /library/ethics/AMA   (309 words)

  
 Why Jewish Medical Ethics
Avraham Steinberg, a pediatric neurologist at Shaarei Tzeddek hospital in Jerusalem and prolific author on Jewish medical ethics, was asked whether it was ethical to secretly discard the Ethiopians' blood.
For this reason, Jewish medical ethics is merely the application of Jewish law to medicine, just as kashrut is the application of Jewish law to food, or Jewish tort law is the application of Jewish law to monetary damages.
Probably the most useful halachic literature for evaluating medical ethics issues from a Jewish perspective are the many thousands of responsa written over the last thousand years that deal with every conceivable aspect of life.
www.aish.com /societyWork/sciencenature/Why_Jewish_Medical_Ethics.asp   (2452 words)

  
 Medical Ethics - springhouse corporation medical books
New medical, reproductive, and genetic technology in the second half of the 20th century led to increased concern about moral issues in medical treatment and research.
By the 1990s, medical ethics, or bioethics, emerged as a recognized discipline that involved physicians, nurses, attorneys, theologians, philosophers, and sociologists.
Medical ethicists debate whether cloning of human beings should be permitted, as well as the potential effects on society.
www.medicalbooks.com /medical-ethics.html   (516 words)

  
 Medical personnel at Abu Ghraib ignored medical ethics and human rights   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Medical personnel and medical information was also used to design and implement psychologically and physically coercive interrogations.
A comprehensive investigation of the performance of the military medical system is needed to serve as a basis for reforms.
The US military medical services, human rights groups, legal and medical academics, and health professional associations should jointly and comprehensively review this material in light of US and international law, medical ethics, the military code of justice, military training, the system for handling reports of human rights abuses, and standards for the treatment of detainees.
www.news-medical.net /?id=4225   (847 words)

  
 Medical Ethics Curriculum
The fourth-year medical students have the opportunity to take a variety of month-long courses in the medical humanities including History of Medicine, Literature and Medicine, Law and Medicine, War and Medicine, Death and Dying, Electives in Medical Ethics and Humanities (Independent Projects), and Osler, The Man and His Writings.
In addition to the month-long selectives, there is also a three-hour required portion of the fourth-year curriculum for medical humanities that is taught in the classroom during the Dean's Month.
We offered an ethics course for the students receiving Ph.D.s in medical science for the first time in the spring of 1993.
www.ecu.edu /cs-dhs/medhum/medEthicsCurriculum.cfm   (586 words)

  
 Medical Ethics
The principal issues to be addressed in contemporary medical ethics may be summarised as moral personhood (the question of who is and who is not entitled to moral respect), abortion, embryo experimentation, genetic engineering, consent to treatment, resource allocation, defining death, organ transplantation, living wills, the persistent vegetative state, and euthanasia.
There are signs, however, that a Buddhist perspective on certain aspects of medical treatment is beginning to appear, for example Epstein (1993) and Kabat-Zinn's (1990, 1994) integration of Buddhist meditation into medical practice, and the growing literature on Buddhism and social justice, such as Jones (1989) and Sizemore and Swearer (1993).
Personhood is both a central problem for Buddhist ethics and Western medical ethics, and consequently a very promising area for a dialogue between the two.
www.purifymind.com /MedicalEthics.htm   (4427 words)

  
 Principles of Veterinary Medical Ethics of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)
All veterinarians are expected to adhere to a progressive code of ethical conduct known as the Principles of Veterinary Medical Ethics (the Principles).
Veterinarians should not allow their medical judgement to be influenced by agreements by which they stand to profit through referring clients to other providers of services or products.
The medical judgements of veterinarians should not be influenced by contracts or agreements made by their associations or societies.
www.avma.org /issues/policy/ethics.asp   (3030 words)

  
 aarogya.com "Legalities and Informatics - Medical Ethics"
For this purpose, it is essential that doctors themselves adhere to basic ethics and etiquettes in their practice.
Medical ethics means moral principles that ought to guide doctors in their practice of medicine and in their dealings with their patients and other members of their profession.
Medical etiquettes would be essentially limited to the mutual relationship between members of the medical profession.
www.aarogya.com /Legalities/ethics/index.asp   (262 words)

  
 ' + strPFPageTitle + '
The Lahey Clinic Section of Medical Ethics is a multidisciplinary group of nurses, administrators, clergy, physicians, lawyers, social workers, physicians in training, and community representatives.
The major tool of the Section of Medical Ethics is education by engaging in a philosophic discussion of the many troubling issues in medicine.
We sponsors the Lahey Clinic Section of Medical Ethics Lecture Series which is open to clinic personnel and the general public.
www.lahey.org /ethics   (430 words)

  
 Medical Ethics
Physicians are governed in their day-to-day practices by principles of medical ethics.
Often statements of medical ethics guide physicians in walking the tightropes of situational ethics inherent in the practice of medicine.
Medical ethics also protect the public's interest in their receipt of safe and quality medical care.
www.iowamedical.org /ola/ethics.htm   (150 words)

  
 Medical Ethics
The Medical Ethics Committee comprises a multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals and other interested parties who are specifically charged with the responsibility of addressing bioethical issues and dilemmas.
The service is available in an advisory capacity to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems pertaining to patient care by facilitating communication and shared decision-making while maximizing the options for those making difficult ethical decisions and not be seeking to impose moral preferences of its members or particular outcomes on patients, their families, or staff.
A request for ethics consultation may be made by any patient, family member, significant other with a legitimate interest in the patient, or any healthcare provider directly involved in the patient’s care.
www-nmcp.med.navy.mil /CustomerServices/ethics.asp   (438 words)

  
 Ethics Medical Bioethics Health Care
In response, the growth of the ethics materials available to doctors through the American Medical Association is typified by the AMA medical ethics internet web pages.
Sometimes a medical group will feel the need for a customized seminar on ethics, to give information and point up areas of potential ethics problems in their specific group.
Other times a helping ethics counselor is needed for a specific problem that is causing concern, involving identified individuals and there relations to the medical institution.
www.bucklin.org /ethics_medical.htm   (623 words)

  
 CCME
Founded in 1984 with generous support from Dorothy J. MacLean and her family, the MacLean Center was the nation’s first program devoted to clinical medical ethics.
Clinical medical ethics examines ethical issues that arise in encounters between patients, families, and physicians, and aims to improve the process and outcome of patient care.
The center’s distinguished faculty are drawn from the Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics-Gynecology, Psychiatry, Pediatrics as well as the University’s School of Law, the Graduate School of Business, the Harris School of Public Policy, and the Divisions of the Social Sciences and the Humanities.
ethics.bsd.uchicago.edu   (193 words)

  
 Medical ethics
Medical ethics is the discipline of evaluating the merits, risks, and social concerns of activities in the field of medicine.
To reconcile conflicting principles, Bernard Gert, a philosopher who specializes in medical ethics, propounds a theory that would require us to advocate our action publicly if we were to violate any basic moral principles (e.g., break a promise in order to save a life).
Hare and Michael E. Berumen, would require us to formulate a universal prescription in conformance with logic, such that all rational parties, including the patient (assuming he is rational), would subscribe to the same action in all circumstances that share the same essential properties.
en.mcfly.org /Medical_ethics   (432 words)

  
 Imperial - Medical Ethics Unit
The Medical Ethics Unit is the centre for biomedical ethics research and teaching at Imperial College London.
Gillon’s primary interest in medical ethics but also was a focus of research on ethics in science and technology.
The purpose of the Unit is to provide high quality teaching and training in medical ethics for undergraduate medical students, and to carry out internationally recognised research in the ethical and social aspects of medicine and biomedical science and technology.
www1.imperial.ac.uk /medicine/about/divisions/ephpc/pcsm/research/meu   (278 words)

  
 Medical Ethics for Student Doctors
The law can be informed by ethics, and often is. Sometimes the law may fly in the face of established ethical principles, such as a law requiring a doctor to send incurable patients to a gas chamber.
This is, by and large, seen as reasonable by the courts, the public and the medical profession, and in this case the law conforms to the prevailing ethos or vice versa.
Some contemporary medical schools impose a revised version of the oath as an admonition and an affirmation to which their graduating classes assent.
www.priory.com /ethics.htm   (5026 words)

  
 AMA (Ethics) Principles of medical ethics
The medical profession has long subscribed to a body of ethical statements developed primarily for the benefit of the patient.
A physician shall uphold the standards of professionalism, be honest in all professional interactions, and strive to report physicians deficient in character or competence, or engaging in fraud or deception, to appropriate entities.
A physician shall, in the provision of appropriate patient care, except in emergencies, be free to choose whom to serve, with whom to associate, and the environment in which to provide medical care.
www.ama-assn.org /ama/pub/category/2512.html   (353 words)

  
 Medical Ethics @ Suite101: Debating issues like stem cell research, cloning, "designer babies", surrogate ...
This outcome is related to the ethics of research on human subjects.
Some members of the deaf and dwarf communities want to pass on these characteristics to their offspring.
Recent studies have documented evidence of injuries and deaths in hospitals due to medical errors.
medicalethics.suite101.com   (249 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.