Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Medici family


Related Topics

  
  Medici - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Medici family was a powerful and influential Florentine family from the 13th to 17th century.
Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici was the first Medici to enter banking, and while he became influential in Florentine government, it wasn't until son Cosimo the Elder took over that in 1434 as gran maestro that the Medici became unofficial head of state of the Florentine republic.
Marie de Medici, widow of Henri IV and mother of Louis XIII, is used by Peter Paul Rubens in 1622-23 as the subject in his oil painting Marie de' Medici, Queen of France, Landing in Marseilles.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Medici   (965 words)

  
 MEDICI (FAMILY) - LoveToKnow Article on MEDICI (FAMILY)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Medici were now reinstated in all their former dignities and honors, and Cosimo on the evening of the 6th of September, rode past the desertet mansions of the Albizzi and re-entered his own dwelling after an exile of a year.
Of the younger branch of the Medici, the latter was second cousin of the Cosimo already mentioned as the son of Giovanni delle Bande Nere.
By Alessandro's death the elder branch of the Medici became extinct, and thus the appearance of the younger line was heralded by a bloody crime.
13.1911encyclopedia.org /M/ME/MEDICI_FAMILY_.htm   (12022 words)

  
 Lorenzo de' Medici - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lorenzo di Piero de' Medici (January 1, 1449, Florence – 8 April 1492, Carregio) was an Italian statesman and ruler of the Florentine Republic during the height of the Italian Renaissance.
Another Medici, his brother Giovanni, restored it, but it was only made wholly secure again on the accession of a distant relative from a branch line of the family, Cosimo I de' Medici.
Lorenzo de' Medici died peacefully during the night of April 8th/9th, 1492, at the long-time family villa of Careggi (Florentine reckoning considers days to begin at sunset, so his death date is the 9th in that reckoning).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lorenzo_de'_Medici   (1031 words)

  
 The Galileo Project | Galileo | Patrons | Medici Family
In the 14th century the family's wealth and political influence increased until the gonfaliere Salvestro de' Medici led the common people in the revolt of the ciompi (small artisanate).
The family's fortune then fell until it was restored by Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici (1360-1429), who made the Medici the wealthiest family in Italy, perhaps Europe.
The Medici family dominated Florentine politics for two and a half centuries and presided over a cultural achievement that is equalled only by Athens in the golden age.
galileo.rice.edu /gal/medici.html   (1482 words)

  
 Medici family - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Medici family   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Noble family that ruled the Italian city-state of Florence from the 15th to the 18th centuries.
The first family member to control the city, from 1434 to 1464, was Cosimo de' Medici (‘the Elder’); he and his grandson Lorenzo (‘the Magnificent’), who ruled from 1469 to 1492, made Florence the foremost city-state in Renaissance Italy, and were famed as patrons of the arts and humanist thought.
Other prominent family members included the 16th-century popes Leo X and Clement VII, and the French queens Catherine de' Medici and Marie de' Medici.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Medici+family   (242 words)

  
 Cosimo de' Medici - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cosimo di Giovanni de' Medici (September 27, 1389, Florence – August 1, 1464, Careggi), was the first of the Medici political dynasty, rulers of Florence during most of the Italian Renaissance; also known as "Cosimo 'the Elder'" and "Cosimo Pater Patriae."
In 1433 Cosimo was exiled from Florence by Rinaldo degli Albizzi, but his fortunes soon changed, and he returned in 1434, to ably lead the Republic for the rest of his long life.
Cosimo was also noted for his patronage of culture and the arts, liberally spending the family fortune (which his astute business sense considerably increased) to enrich Florence.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cosimo_de'_Medici   (308 words)

  
 Florence Art Guide - The Medici Family
The origins of the House of the Medici family are to be found buried in the depths of the Tuscan countryside, in other words, in the Mugello, where the castle-villa of Cafaggiolo can be identified as their "cradle".
However the first historical traces of the family were in Florence, where Salvestro, the son of Messer Alamanno dei Medici, joined the "common people" in the well-known revolt of the Ciompi (1378), the largest social upheaval in the history of the Florentine Republic.
Meanwhile the descendants of Lorenzo dei Medici the Elder lived in the shadow of the senior branch and, at times, also took advantage of the disadventures of the more powerful family or did what they could to cause trouble, as was typical among the rebellious elements to be found in most reigning houses.
www.mega.it /eng/egui/epo/medici.htm   (657 words)

  
 The Medici Family
This betrayal caused the family to evacuate from Florence in 1494.
In 1537 however this line of the family was finished when Alessandro, duke of Florence at the time was assassinated for being a cruel authoritarian, This death did not stop this powerful family instead it brought in a whole new branch of the family to power.
The Medici family was famous and known in all areas from banking and ruling to being patrons and collectors.
www.lakesideschool.org /studentweb/worldhistory/renaissance2/TheMediciFamily.htm   (963 words)

  
 Crafting the Medici   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The exhibition, entitled Crafting the Medici: Patrons and Artisans in Florence, 1537-1737, places portraits of the Medici family in the context of the breadth of Florentine craftsmanship, in media ranging from painting to printmaking, gold- and silversmithing, leatherwork, and textile manufacture all in the service of crafting a public image for the Medici rulers.
Made in the years following the establishment of Medici rule in 1537, the extremely formal lineage portraits (some of them of infants and young children) were designed to show dynastic succession and provided painters with "authorized" models from which to make any number of copies whenever needed.
Crafting the Medici will also include a selection of pattern and ornament prints lent from the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and, examples of 16th and 17th century Italian lace, silversmith’s work, jewelry, and edged weaponry lent by the RISD Museum.
www.brown.edu /Facilities/David_Winton_Bell_Gallery/medici.html   (492 words)

  
 Exhuming the Medici family   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The bodies of 50 members of Florence's Medici dynasty - some of whom are believed to have been poisoned - are to be exhumed for forensic tests to determine how they lived and died.
The first members of the family who ruled Florence from the 15th century to 1737 will be removed from the Medici Chapels in Michelangelo's church of San Lorenzo in June.
The declared purpose is to tap into the secrets and reconstruct the lifestyle of the colourful family of uncertain origin who went on to decide the destiny of Florence.
www.mirabilis.ca /archives/001360.html   (235 words)

  
 Discovery Channel :: News :: Medici Family Murders Debunked in Italy
His wife Eleonora da Toledo, beautifully portrayed by Agnolo Bronzino in a painting on display at the Uffizi, was five feet tall (1.58 meter), had twisted legs, suffered from toothache and had shin splints caused by an inflammation of the outer layer of the bone that occurs often during the later stages of syphilis.
The healthiest in the family was Cardinal Giovanni, though arrested growth in Garcia's bones show that he suffered from various illnesses as a child.
The most well-known Medicis, such as Lorenzo the Magnificent (1449-1492) and Cosimo the Elder (1389-1464), founder of the Medici political dynasty, will not be exhumed, since they rest beneath beautiful Michelangelo tombstones too fragile to move.
dsc.discovery.com /news/briefs/20041011/medici.html   (689 words)

  
 THE MEDICI FAMILY
While the Medici family was predominant, Florence became the cultural center of Europe and also became the cradle of new Humanism.
One of the many accomplishments that the Medici family offered in the Renaissance period was when their wealth had first begun.
The Medici family members were very interested in the rebirth of learning in Europe and under their patronage the Renaissance flourished.
www.yesnet.yk.ca /schools/projects/renaissance/main/medici.html   (604 words)

  
 Medici family --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - The online encyclopedia you can trust!
The family, noted for its often tyrannical rulers and its beneficent patrons of the arts, also provided the church with four popes (Leo X, Clement VII, Pius IV, and Leo XI) and married into the royal families of Europe, notably in France (Catherine de Médicis and Marie de Médicis).
The effective founder of the family was Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici (1360–1429), a merchant who amassed great wealth in trade and was the virtual ruler of Florence from 1421 to 1429.
His probable illegitimate son, Alessandro de' Medici, a tyrant, was the last of the direct male line of the elder branch.
www.britannica.com /ebc/article-9371736?tocId=9371736   (1087 words)

  
 Medici, Italian family. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The rise of the Medici in Florence coincided with the triumph of the capitalist class over the guild merchants and artisans.
The rule of the Medici, though denounced by their enemies as tyrannical, was at first generally tolerant and wise, but became stultifying and bigoted in the 17th and 18th cent.
The genealogy of the family is complicated by numerous illegitimate offspring and by the tendency of some of the members to dispose of each other by assassination.
www.bartleby.com /65/me/Medici.html   (408 words)

  
 Medici family
Noble family that ruled the Italian city-state of Florence from the 15th to the 18th centuries.
The first family member to control the city, from 1434 to 1464, was Cosimo de' Medici (‘the Elder’); he and his grandson Lorenzo (‘the Magnificent’;), who ruled from 1469 to 1492, made Florence the foremost city-state in Renaissance Italy, and were famed as patrons of the arts and humanist thought.
Other prominent family members included the 16th-century popes Leo X and Clement VII, and the French queens Catherine de' Medici and Marie de' Medici.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0004724.html   (233 words)

  
 Your way to Florence:accommodation, tourist services and resources of Chianti, Florence, Tuscany, Italy.
The Medici policy was always aimed at encouraging democratic aspirations, but the basic intention of the family was to turn those aspirations to their own advantage and to exploit them into their own interest.
When the Cafaggiolo's fortune turned against them, and members of the family were persecuted and exiled, the Popolani rose to prominence on a platform of democratic reform, establishing a popular reputation as free citizens in a free city.
The pope, the patriarch of Constantinople, and the emperor of Constantinople, John VIII Paleologus, were guests of Florence and of the Medici.
www.arca.net /db/medici/medici1.htm   (762 words)

  
 MEDICI FAMILY PAPERS
Giulio Dozelo to Giulio de Medici, December 29, 1565, regarding a pair of slippers and stockings--money involved.
Giulio Dozelo to Giulio de Medici, February 10, 1566, regarding a consignment, but it was still the Sabbath and the first day of Lent.
Biagio Guasti at Mirabello to Giulio de Medici, February 27, 1576, regarding the carriage of grain.
specialcollections.wichita.edu /collections/ms/93-07/93-7-B.HTML   (6330 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: House of Medici
A Florentine family, the members of which, having acquired great wealth as bankers, rose in a few generations to be first the unofficial rulers of the republic of Florence and afterwards the recognized sovereigns of Tuscany.
On the restoration of the Medici in 1512, his son Lorenzo was made ruler of Florence.
But in 1530, after the famous siege, the city was compelled to surrender to the imperial forces, and Charles V made Alessandro de' Medici, an illegitimate son of the younger Lorenzo, hereditary head of the Florentine government.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/10120a.htm   (1478 words)

  
 Frontline: Alessandro de Medici
He was the patron of some of the leading artists of the era and is one of the two Medici princes whose remains are buried in the famous tomb by Michaelangelo.
Alessandro was born in 1510 to a fl serving woman in the Medici household who, after her subsequent marriage to a muleteer, is simply referred to in existing documents as Simonetta da Collavechio.
Since they were his cousins and since Cosimo had to consolidate the authority of the Medici family, Cosimo raised Alessandro's children in his own household and continued as their guardian until adulthood.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/secret/famous/medici.html   (874 words)

  
 Medici -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Medici family was a powerful and influential (Click link for more info and facts about Florentine) Florentine family from the (Click link for more info and facts about 13th) 13th to (Click link for more info and facts about 17th) 17th century.
The Medici were accomplished in fields other than (The study of government of states and other political units) politics too.
The most significant accomplishments of the Medici were in (The creation of beautiful or significant things) art and (The discipline dealing with the principles of design and construction and ornamentation of fine buildings) architecture, within which the portfolio of talent employed by Medici is a "Who's Who?" of Renaissance art and architecture.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/m/me/medici.htm   (1625 words)

  
 Medici Family --  Encyclopædia Britannica
French Médicis, Italian bourgeois family that ruled Florence and, later, Tuscany, during most of the period from 1434 to 1737, except for two brief intervals (from 1494 to 1512 and from 1527 to 1530).
Italian bourgeois family that ruled Florence and, later, Tuscany, during most of the period from 1434 to 1737, except for two brief intervals (from 1494 to 1512 and from 1527 to 1530).
The funereal monuments were commissioned in 1520 by Pope Clement VII (formerly Cardinal Giulio de' Medici), executed largely by Michelangelo from 1520 to 1534, and completed by Michelangelo's pupils after his departure.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9051736?tocId=9051736   (860 words)

  
 The Medici Family   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The family's poltical influence again increased, and Giovanni was gonfaliere in 1421.
His power was such that when the Medici family was expelled in 1494, he ruled the city and became a major power in Italy.
Hale, J. Florence and the Medici: the Pattern of Control.
cnx.rice.edu /content/m11975/latest   (1529 words)

  
 Medici - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Giovanni de' Medici (1475–1523), also known as Pope Leo X
Giulio de' Medici (1478–1534), also known as Pope Clement VII
Alessandro Ottaviano de' Medici (1535–1605), also known as Pope Leo XI Marie de' Medici (1573–1642), Queen and Regent of France
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Medici_family   (965 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.