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Topic: Medieval Inquisition


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In the News (Thu 25 Apr 19)

  
  Medieval Inquisition - Karr.net   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Medieval Inquisition is a term historians use to describe the various inquisitions that started around 1184, including the Episcopal inquisition (1184-1230s) and later the Papal inquisition (1230s) by the Roman Catholic Church ("The Church").
The Medieval Inquisitions were in response to growing religious movements, in particular the Cathars first noted in the 1140s and the Waldensians starting around 1170, in southern France and northern Italy.
The first medieval inquisition, the episcopal inquisition, was established in the year 1184 by a papal bull entitled "Ad abolendam," "For the purpose of doing away with." The inquisition was in response to the growing Catharist heresy in southern France.
www.karr.net /encyclopedia/Medieval_Inquisition   (1405 words)

  
 IDIS-DPF: Medieval Inquisition
The Inquisition arose at the end of Middle Ages proper as a Church’s answer to the excesses of the heretical movements that didn’t limit themselves to support deviations of strictly theological character – which had till then opposed on a doctrinal level and only by spiritual means – but were also deadly threatening society.
Medieval Inquisition is then defined by French historian Jean-Baptiste Guiraud (1866-1953) as "[...] a system of repressive means, some of temporal and some others of spiritual kind, concurrently issued by ecclesiastical and civil auhorities in order to protect religious orthodoxy and social order, both threatened by theological and social doctrines of heresy".
Death penalty wasn’t inexorably inflicted by the Inquisition, and the judgment was often modified, in sharp contrast with the unfailing execution of the guilty by secular tribunals and with the mercilessness of inquisitional systems in Protestant countries.
www.alleanzacattolica.org /idis_dpf/english/i_medieval_inquisition.htm   (1485 words)

  
 The Inquisition
The Medieval Inquisition can be considered to occur between 1235 and 1400, and is characterised by the direct control of the Pope, administration by the monastic orders of the Dominicans and Franciscans, and finding its opponents in the Cathars, the Spiritual Franciscans and Waldesians, all genuine schismatic reform movements.
In fact, the notable excesses of the Medieval Inquisition generally came down to this; as in the case of the Trial of the Knights Templar.
When Jean was captured, the Inquisition was called in by the English to ascertain that this was actually a case of demonic influence, on the grounds of the inspiration and the fact she wore men's garments, which in some interpretations of the bible has the status of a crime.
www.tabula-rasa.info /DarkAges/Inquisition.html   (3080 words)

  
 European Voyages of Exploration: Inquisition
The Inquisition was a judicial instrument of the Church during the Middle Ages.
The purpose of the Inquisition was to combat devil-worship, adultery, incest, and especially heretics and heresy (particularly Cathars and Waldensians).
When the Inquisition arrived in a city or town, a "Time of Grace", usually thirty days would be granted, during which heretics had an opportunity to confess and avoid prosecution if they revealed the names of their fellow heretics.
www.acs.ucalgary.ca /applied_history/tutor/eurvoya/inquisition.html   (1073 words)

  
 Encyclopedia of Religious Freedom -- Sample Entries   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Roman inquisition was the most moderate of all in its sparing use of torture and infrequent recourse to the death penalty, although famous victims such as Giordano Bruno and Galileo Galilei did suffer at its hands.
Inquisitions also operated in places such as Venice and Sicily, but in Venice their activities were strictly controlled by the Venetian government, and in Sicily they functioned under the auspices of the Spanish crown and not the papacy.
The Roman inquisition fell into disuse by the eighteenth century, was redesignated the "Congregation of the Holy Office" in 1908 by Pope Pius X, and has existed since 1966 as a theological advisory committee of the papal curia with no investigative or coercive powers.
www.routledge-ny.com /religionandsociety/relfreedom/inquisition.html   (2593 words)

  
 Inquisition - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Inquisition, tribunal of the Roman Catholic Church established for the investigation of heresy.
Secular rulers came to use the persecution of heresy as a weapon of state, as in the case of the suppression of the Knights Templars.
The Spanish government tried to establish the Inquisition in all its dominions; but in the Spanish Netherlands the local officials did not cooperate, and the inquisitors were chased (1510) out of Naples, apparently with the pope's connivance.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-inquisit.html   (902 words)

  
 Historical Overview of the Inquisition
However, the repression of heresy remained unorganized, and with the large scale heresies in the 11th and 12th centuries, Pope Gregory IX instituted the papal inquisition in 1231 for the apprehension and trial of heretics.
Medieval kings, princes, bishops, and civil auth orities wavered between acceptance and resistance of the Inquisition.
Whereas the medieval Inquisition had focused on popular misconceptions which resulted in the disturbance of public order, the Holy Office was concerned with orthodoxy of a more academic nature, especially as it appeared in the writings of theologians.
galileo.rice.edu /lib/student_work/trial96/loftis/overview.html   (852 words)

  
 Medieval Inquisition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Medieval Inquisition is a term historians use to describe the various inquisitions that started around 1184, including the Episcopal inquisition (1184-1230s) and later the Papal inquisition (1230s) by the Roman Catholic Church ("The Church").
The Medieval Inquisitions were in response to growing religious movements, in particular the Cathars first noted in the 1140s and the Waldensians starting around 1170, in southern France and northern Italy.
The first medieval inquisition, the episcopal inquisition, was established in the year 1184 by a papal bull entitled "Ad abolendam," "For the purpose of doing away with." The inquisition was in response to the growing Catharist heresy in southern France.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Medieval_Inquisition   (1371 words)

  
 Inquisition. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Secular rulers came to use the persecution of heresy as a weapon of state, as in the case of the suppression of the Knights Templars.
The Inquisition was an emergency device and was employed mainly in S France, N Italy, and Germany.
The Spanish government tried to establish the Inquisition in all its dominions; but in the Spanish Netherlands the local officials did not cooperate, and the inquisitors were chased (1510) out of Naples, apparently with the pope’s connivance.
www.bartleby.com /65/in/Inquisit.html   (728 words)

  
 medieval inquisition
In his bull Excommunicamus, Pope Gregory IX formally instituted the Inquisition in 1231 as a means of repressing heresy, particularly that of the Albigenses.
The Inquisition was first established in Germany, extended to Spain in 1232, and became a general institution be 1233.
Hence it is evident that the Inquisition marks a substantial advance in the administration of justice and therefore in the general civilization of mankind; it substituted court procedure for mob action and lynch law.
biblia.com /christianity/medieval.htm   (1352 words)

  
 Medieval Inquisition   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Investigating heresy was the work of the medieval inquisition.
The Spanish Inquisition, authorized in 1478, was quite distinct from the medieval tribunal.
Staffed by Franciscans and Dominicans, the medieval inquisition imposed penances short of capital punishment.
courseweb.stthomas.edu /medieval/francis/inquisition.htm   (416 words)

  
 Catholic Culture : Document Library : Truth about the Spanish Inquisition, The
The medieval Inquisition began in 1184 when Pope Lucius III sent a list of heresies to Europe's bishops and commanded them to take an active role in determining whether those accused of heresy were, in fact, guilty.
The simple fact is that the medieval Inquisition saved uncounted thousands of innocent (and even not-so-innocent) people who would otherwise have been roasted by secular lords or mob rule.
The Spanish Inquisition, already established as a bloodthirsty tool of religious persecution, was derided by Enlightenment thinkers as a brutal weapon of intolerance and ignorance.
www.catholicculture.org /docs/doc_view.cfm?recnum=5236   (4312 words)

  
 Ecclesia Militans: The Holy Inquisition, Myth or Reality
Myth: The medieval Inquisition was a suppressive, all encompassing, and all-powerful, centralized organ of repression maintained by the Catholic Church.
The myth of the Inquisition was actually shaped in the hands of "anti-Hispanic and religious reformers in the 16th Century."4 It was an image assembled from a body of legends and myths, which took shape in the context of the intense religious persecution of the 16th Century.
Myth: The Inquisition was born from the bigotry, cruelty and intolerance of the medieval world, dominated by the Catholic Church.
www.geocities.com /militantis/inquisition2.html   (6786 words)

  
 Definition of Medieval Inquisition
The medieval inquisitions were in response to growing mass heretical movements, in particular the Cathars first noted in the 1140s and the Waldensians starting around 1170.
Thus there were different types of inquisitions in medieval Europe, the episcopal inquisition and the papal inquisition, distinguished by their administration and methods.
The inquisitions in combination with the Albigensian Crusade were fairly successful in eliminating mass heresy.
www.wordiq.com /definition/Medieval_Inquisition   (1227 words)

  
 LINK-MAIL: The Inquisition and the Roman Catholic Church
The Inquisition ("..The Inquisition was a Roman Catholic tribunal for discovery and punishment of heresy, which was marked by the severity of questioning and punishment and lack of rights afforded to the accused.
The Inquisition - Witch is Witch ("..In 1235 Anno Domini, Pope Gregory IX produced the documents that formalised the detection and prosecution of heretics as part of church procedure, throughout the dominions of the Christian church...")
The Spanish Inquisition ("..is known for the terror it caused the inhabitants of the Iberian peninsula.
www.link-mail.com /44130.html   (762 words)

  
 Inquisition
The Inquisition resulted in the torture and murder of millions of Christians whose only crime was a rejection of Catholic heresy and a commitment to follow the Bible as their sole authority for faith and practice.
The Inquisition was an image assembled from a body of legends and myths which, between the sixteenth and the twentieth centuries, established the perceived character of inquisitorial tribunals and influenced all ensuing efforts to recover their historical reality.
This was the formal establishment of the medieval inquisition.
www.catholicleague.org /research/inquisition.html   (12594 words)

  
 The Truth About the Spanish Inquisition
So, while medieval secular leaders were trying to safeguard their kingdoms, the Church was trying to save souls.
The Inquisition provided a means for heretics to escape death and return to the community.
The Spanish Inquisition, already established as a bloodthirsty tool of religious persecution, was derided by Enlightenment thinkers as a brutal weapon of intolerance and ignorance.
www.catholiceducation.org /links/jump.cgi?ID=3930   (4333 words)

  
 H-Net Review: Kathryn A. Edwards on Inquisition and Medieval Society: Power, Discipline, and ...
The medieval inquisition has been typically treated as a means of enhancing the power of more distant secular and spiritual authorities through its control over the bodies and minds of those it examines.
Rather than a Roman-based inquisition supervised by a Grand Inquisitor (one of several early modern alternatives), the inquisition of medieval Europe was staffed by members of competing religious orders and followed varying spiritual and political mandates.
The inquisition in Languedoc which Given so intelligently portrays is embattled and, at times, unaware of the problems which beset it, but is a realistic reflection of the ambitions of and accommodations made by medieval institutions attempting to focus and wield power.
www.h-net.org /reviews/showrev.cgi?path=656913150824   (2202 words)

  
 Inquisition
The Inquisition is often considered the "slam dunk" in the argument that the Catholic Church is not of God and that Religion is stale.
Jewish historian Steven Katz remarked on the Medieval Inquisition that "in its entirety, the thirteenth and fourteenth century Inquisition put very few people to death and sent few people to prison; 90 percent of its sentences were canonical penances" (The Holocaust in Historical Context, 1994).
The myth of the witch-hunting inquisition was built on several assumptions and mistakes, all of which have been overturned in the last twenty-five years...
www.davidmacd.com /catholic/inquisition.htm   (6880 words)

  
 Inquisition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It was broadly used in law, before the Medieval Inquisition, to refer a common law procedure of inquiring into a matter, investigating, usually through interrogation, and by use of force (see Argumentum ad baculum).
Historians distinguish between four different manifestations of the Inquisition: the Medieval or Episcopal Inquisition, the Spanish Inquisition, the Portuguese Inquisition and the Roman Inquisition.
The Goa Inquisition was the office of the Inquisition acting in the Indian city of Goa and the rest of the Portuguese empire in Asia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Inquisition   (2417 words)

  
 The Dark Ages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Inquisition was an institution formally established by the Christian Church, in the person of Pope Gregory IX, in 1321, and was charged with seeking out, trying and sentencing persons guilty of the broadly defined crime of "heresy".
The Inquisition was then harnessed by Pope Pius V, who reigned from 1566 to 1572, against all sorts of dissenters at the time of the Protestant revolt in the Catholic Church.
The imposition of the Inquisition was also severe: many of the "dissenters" targeted by the Church were some of the brightest scientists of the time, whose only crime was to look for scientific explanations for natural phenomena not explained in the Bible.
www.stormfront.org /whitehistory/hwr41.htm   (2917 words)

  
 Corrupt Church?
Just as the myth that medieval people believed the earth to be flat is persistent and attractive mainly because it offers an easy explanation for Columbus's voyages of discovery, the myth that the medieval church was a landmark of corruption is often used to explain the success of Luther's Reformation.
From a historical point of view, the idea that the medieval church was corrupt is based on a couple of methodological fallacies, such as disrespect for the peculiarities of medieval religion, arbitrary use of historical evidence, and ignorance of the situation in the medieval church.
The late medieval malversations with benefices might be considered another abuse; while it became a lucrative enterprise for clerics to accumulate ecclesiastical functions and collect revenues, these offices required no presence or care of souls in the place where they were held.
the-orb.net /non_spec/missteps/ch11.html   (2093 words)

  
 AskWhy! on The Medieval Inquisition 5 - Christianity Revealed   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Inquisition, the monastic agents of the pope, were to have independent courts, of the most monstrous description, to ensure the condemnation of secret heretics, and they were then to hand them over to the secular arm and keep a sharp eye on any secular prince or official who failed to do his bloody work.
The Inquisition weighed heavily on Italy (especially Lombardy), on Southern France (in particular the country of Toulouse and in Languedoc) and in the Kingdom of Aragon and on Germany.
The Inquisition in France was suppressed by the secular authorities in 1772.
www.askwhy.co.uk /christianheresy/0815Inquisition.html   (18730 words)

  
 [No title]
To counter the threat of heresy the church used the weapon of inquisition.
Inquisition is a medieval adventure that takes you through plague-infested 14th century Europe in an action-packed search for treasure and riches.
In 1481 the Inquisition started in Spain and ultimately surpassed the medieval Inquisition, in both scope and intensity.
www.lycos.com /info/inquisition--medieval-inquisition.html   (412 words)

  
 The Inquisition
The Inquisition was a Roman Catholic tribunal for discovery and punishment of heresy, which was marked by the severity of questioning and punishment and lack of rights afforded to the accused.
A later pope, Pope Gregory IX established the Inquisition, in 1233, to combat the heresy of the Abilgenses, a religious sect in France.
By 1255, the Inquisition was in full gear throughout Central and Western Europe; although it was never instituted in England or Scandinavia.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/History/Inquisition.html   (768 words)

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