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Topic: Megaloceros giganteus


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In the News (Tue 23 Dec 14)

  
  Irish Elk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Irish Elk (Megaloceros giganteus) is an extinct deer that lived in Europe during the Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene epochs.
It is famous for its formidable size (about two meters at the shoulders), and in particular for having the largest antlers of any known cervid (a maximum of 13 feet from tip to tip).
However, Stephen Jay Gould 's important essay on Megaloceros demonstrated that for deer in general, species with larger body size have antlers that are more than proportionately larger, a consequence of allometry, or differential growth rate of body size and antler size during development.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Irish_Elk   (483 words)

  
 Megaloceros - Wikipedia
Der Megaloceros, auch Riesenhirsch (Megaloceros giganteus) genannt, war ein eiszeitlicher Hirsch Europas.
Da sich Megaloceros in zahlreichen Höhlenzeichnungen eiszeitlicher Menschen findet, ist davon auszugehen, dass er bei der Jagd der frühen Menschen Europas eine große Rolle gespielt hat.
Megaloceros tauchte vor etwa 400.000 Jahren auf und starb vor 9.500 Jahren aus, war also ein Tier des Pleistozäns.
de.wikipedia.org /wiki/Megaloceros   (125 words)

  
 InfoHub Forums - Megaloceros - The Largest Deer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Megaloceros is most closely related to the fallow deer (Dama dama).
Megaloceros inhabited an extremely wide range of territory.
Fossils of Megaloceros date back to at least 1.5 million years ago, which was during the early Pleistocene.
www.infohub.com /forums/printthread.php?t=2966   (162 words)

  
 Pleistocene to Holocene extinction dynamics in giant deer and woolly mammoth   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Barnosky, A. Taphonomy and herd structure of the extinct Irish Elk Megaloceros giganteus.
Megaloceros giganteus Blumenbach) in Scandinavia – chronology and environment">Article
Megaloceros giganteus Blumenbach) in Scandinavia – chronology and environment">ISI
www.nature.com /nature/journal/v431/n7009/abs/nature02890.html   (666 words)

  
 ABC - Science - Beasts - Megaloceros Factfile   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Megaloceros fossils are found in large numbers in the peat bogs of Ireland (hence their common name ‘Irish Elk').
Megaloceros is often confusingly called the ‘Irish Elk', although it was found all across Europe, not just Ireland, and was technically a deer rather than an elk.
Its huge antlers were once thought to have been its downfall, growing so large that the animals could no longer lift their heads, or got them entangled between trees.
abc.gov.au /beasts/factfiles/factfiles/megaloceros.htm   (118 words)

  
 Antler growth and extinction of Irish elk   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Adult male Irish elk (Megaloceros giganteus) grew the largest antlers of any extinct or extant cervid.
We used a mineral and energy metabolism model developed for extant cervids to compare nutritional requirements for antler growth among Irish elk and extant cervids.
Irish elk grew antlers very close to the maximum antler mass possible for their body mass, antler Ca and P stoichiometry, daily forage intake, and length of the antler growing season.
www.d.umn.edu /~rmoen/EvolEcoRes01.html   (219 words)

  
 AMNH Bestiary
Originally discovered in bog deposits in Ireland, Megaloceros lived on the European mainland as well.
Megaloceros rivaled a large moose in size (approximately 1,500 lb), making it one of the largest known deer.
Its famously enormous antlers -- some of which obtained a 13-foot spread -- were used in ritualized combat between males.
www.amnh.org /science/biodiversity/extinction/Resources/Bestiary/Artiodactyla2.html   (346 words)

  
 Paleocraft Megaloceros
M egaloceros giganteus was a giant deer that evolved during the glacial periods of the Pleistocene epoch 250,000 to 12,000 years ago.
L ike modern deer, Megaloceros probably had to shed its antlers each year, often leaving the buck with an awkward lop-sided appearance as one antler would fall before the other.
It is believed to have died out because it was unable to adapt to the subarctic conditions after the final retreat of the ice sheet.
www.paleocraft.com /Megaloceras.html   (1794 words)

  
 Ask A Scientist - Genetic change
So, an organism may be selected to be bigger, but as size increases, certain characteristics get bigger at a faster rate than others, so not only the size but also the shape of the organism change.
For example, the extinct Irish elk, Megaloceros giganteus, is the largest of all deer.
Not only does it have the largest antlers, but the ratio of antler size to body size is greater for M.
www.hhmi.org /askascientist/answers/genetics/ans_014.html   (723 words)

  
 NCRV - Reuzenhert
Megaloceros -fossielen worden in groten getale gevonden in de veenmoerassen van Ierland.
Afgezien van Ierland zijn in heel Europa overblijfselen van Megaloceros aangetroffen.
Zijn enorme gewei werd ooit verantwoordelijk gehouden voor zijn ondergang, omdat het zo groot werd dat de dieren hun kop niet meer omhoog konden krijgen of tussen bomen bleven steken.
cgi.ncrv.nl /ncrv/walkingwithbeasts/factfiles/factfiles/megaloceros.shtml   (102 words)

  
 Of Moose, Megaloceros and Miracles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Megaloceros giganteus, the regal, extinct Irish elk, sported the most impressive headgear of any known deer.
But perhaps the most intriguing remains to emerge from the bogs are those of a long-extinct Eurasian deer, Megaloceros giganteus, the Irish elk.
A mature Irish elk stag stood to more than seven feet at the shoulders, could weigh in excess of 1,500 pounds and carried antlers weighing up to 95 pounds and spanning as much as 168 inches from tip to tip.
www.motherearthnews.com /library/1989_March_April/Of_Moose__Megaloceros_and_Miracles   (3075 words)

  
 Pleistocene Mammals in the PIN
Like the Museum of Paleontology at Berkeley, PIN also has fossil specimens of the "Irish elk" (which, incidentally, did not live only in Ireland and wasn't a true elk).
Here is a mounted skeleton of Megaloceros giganteus, from the late Pleistocene of Ryazanskaya Oblast, near the city of Sapozhka.
If you click on the picture you will see a larger view with several other Irish elk skulls on the wall on the right and a reconstruction painting on the wall behind the skeleton.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu /pin/pinpleist.html   (230 words)

  
 elo gallery
A FOSSIL SKULL OF AN EXTINCT ELK, Megaloceros giganteus, Pleistocene.
Megaloceros was a large elk common in Europe.
It sported perhaps the largest antler rack of any of the deer family as can be seen in the massive antler bases of the current specimen.
www.edgarlowen.com /a49ph.html   (877 words)

  
 Zinken - archaeology news: Late Pleistocene remains of giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus Blumenbach) in Scandinavia: ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Zinken - archaeology news: Late Pleistocene remains of giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus Blumenbach) in Scandinavia: chronology and environment
Late Pleistocene remains of giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus Blumenbach) in Scandinavia: chronology and environment
This article presents new data on the Late Pleistocene giant deer, Megaloceros giganteus (Blumenbach), describing its distribution in time and space, geographical and sexual variation and general biology.
zinken.typepad.com /palaeo/2004/04/late_pleistocen.html   (489 words)

  
 MAMMAL FAUNA OF THE LAST INTERGLACIAL IN THE NOVOSIBIRSK CIS-OB REGION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Since the year of 1978, 1925 bone remains of 17 species of large mammals have been collected there by the author.
Complete mammoth skull with tusks, skulls of wolf, bear and female Megaloceros, as well as integrated skulls of young bisons were found in the stratum which testifies to insitu character of the location.
Deer are represented by Megaloceros giganteus (5.8%), Cervus elaphus sibiricus (4.7%) and Alces sp.
sati.archaeology.nsc.ru /gen-i/Editions/Electronical/Bulletens/Herald/Vol1/Chapter8/Vasil.htm   (370 words)

  
 sp=megaloceros   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
AY347754 Megaloceros giganteus isolate meggi6cyt2 cytochrome b (cytb) gene, partial cds; mitochondrial gene for mitochondrial product.
AY347756 Megaloceros giganteus isolate meggi6cyt1 cytochrome b (cytb) gene, partial cds; mitochondrial gene for mitochondrial product.
AY485666 Megaloceros giganteus isolate meggi3 cytochrome b (cytb) mRNA, partial cds; mitochondrial.
pbil.univ-lyon1.fr /cgi-bin/acnuc-search-sp?query=MEGALOCEROS&db=GenBank   (100 words)

  
 Russian Science News
The scientist from the Institute of Plants and Animals Ecology, Russian Academy of Sciences (Ural Branch), has made a description of the giant dear remains, found in the Ural, and has determined their age.
Giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus) originated as a species in the preglacial epoch, lived through the glaciation period and died out about 8-9 thousand years ago after the climate had become warmer.
The remains will help to investigate how the giant dear lived and why this species disappeared.
www.informnauka.ru /eng/sci-2003-07_e.shtml   (253 words)

  
 Museum of Natural History, Wrocław University - "Vertebrate Skeletal System" exhibition.
Other exhibits include skeletons of edentates: the Giant Anteater Myrmecophaga jubata and the tree Two-toed Sloth Choloepus didactylus, and also examples of primate skeletons: the Leopard Panthera pardus and Polar Bear Thalarctos maritimus, representing predacious mammals.
Nie lada ciekawostką wśród parzystokopytnych jest kompletny szkielet wymarłego jelenia olbrzymiego (Megaceros giganteus).
A great curiosity among the even-toed ungulates is a complete skeleton of the extinct Giant Elk Megaloceros giganteus.
www.muzeum-przyrodnicze.uni.wroc.pl /eng/szkielety.php   (312 words)

  
 Teeth
This tooth is 1/2" long x 3/8" wide is Partially rooted, fl in color and shows the wear facet from the animal chewing vegitation.
The Irish elk, Megaloceros giganteus, is something of a misnomer, for it is neither exclusively Irish nor is it an elk.
It is in fact a giant extinct deer, the largest species of deer that there has been, they stood up to seven feet at the shoulder (2.1 meters), with antlers spanning up to 12 feet (3.65 meters).
web.onyxnet.co.uk /John.Gamesby-AZTEKIUM/Teeth.html   (898 words)

  
 COLLEAGUES
She also described a quite complete skeleton of Megaloceros giganteus from northern Germany and analysed its functional adaptations in rut fighting behaviour (Berichte des Vereins Natur und Heimat und des Naturhistorischen Museums zu Lübeck 25/26).
The study of Pliocene carnivores, elephants and antelopes in collaboration with colleagues from the Institute of Speleology «E. Racovita» (Bucharest, Romania), within the framework of a joint project «Evolution of the mammal faunas from Neogene and Quaternary of Romania and the Republic of Moldova», is in progress.
Our target species are: Mammuthus primigenius, Coelodonta antiquitatis, Megaloceros giganteus, Palaeoloxodon antiquus, Hippopotamus amphibius, Stephanorhinus hemitoechus, S. kirchbergensis, Panthera leo and Crocuta crocuta.
home.tiscali.nl /euromam/euromam/nieuwsbrief/1999/99abocol.htm   (3647 words)

  
 PHYLOGENY AND TAXONOMY
were the relatively advanced forms, the Irish elk (Megaloceros) and the brush-antlered elk (Eucladoceros).
A number of related palmate-antlered forms appear in the fossil record and the Irish elk (Megaloceros) is believed to have been an advanced form which may have persisted into classical times (perhaps 500 BC).
The genus Axis of India has two members, the brightly spotted axis or chital (Axis axis) and the smaller hog deer (Axis porcinus) from which it may have arisen.
www.deer.rr.ualberta.ca /library/phylogeny/Phylogeny.html   (4648 words)

  
 BBC - Science & Nature - Wildfacts - Megaloceros, Irish elk, Giant deer
BBC - Science and Nature - Wildfacts - Megaloceros, Irish elk, Giant deer
Its huge antlers were once thought to have been its downfall because they grew so large that the animals could no longer lift their heads, or got them entangled between trees!
Megaloceros fossils are found in large numbers in the peat bogs of Ireland.
www.bbc.co.uk /nature/wildfacts/factfiles/461.shtml   (293 words)

  
 UCL News   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
But new evidence suggests it was Stone Age hunters and not the weather that killed off the majestic beast which stood more than 6ft tall at the shoulder with antlers spanning 11ft.
The evidence shows that the Irish Elk, Megaloceros giganteus or Giant Deer, which experts believed had been wiped out by a cold spell 10,500 years ago, survived well into the modern era.
Professor Adrian Lister, who reported the findings in the journal ‘Nature’, said: “Although we can now bring the extinction date forward by 3,000 years or so, we still can’t tell what actually killed off these beasts.
www.ucl.ac.uk /news/in-the-news/oct-2004/latest/newsitem.shtml?itnoct0409   (297 words)

  
 davidianus Blog   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Cervus nippon Rusa Deer, Cervus timorensis Sambar, Cervus unicolor PËre David's Deer, Elaphurus davidianus Irish Elk, Megaloceros giganteus (extinct) Subfamily Hydropotinae Water Deer, Hydropotes...
nippon Rusa Deer, Cervus timorensis Sambar Deer, Cervus unicolor PËre David's Deer, Elaphurus davidianus Irish Elk, Megaloceros giganteus (extinct) Subfamily Hydropotinae Water Deer, Hydropotes...
Rusa Deer, Cervus timorensis *** Sambar Deer, Cervus unicolor *** PËre David's Deer, Elaphurus davidianus *** Irish Elk, Megaloceros giganteus (extinct) ** Subfamily Hydropotinae *** Water Deer...
reptile-food-inc.com /catalog/davidianus   (1737 words)

  
 Palaeoecology and taxonomy of mammals
A work on a Late Weichselian record of saiga (Saiga tatarica) from Denmark and its indications of glacial history and environment has been completed (K. Aaris-Sørensen, with K.S. Petersen, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, and M. Henriksen, Odense Bys Musser).
A similar work compiling the history of the extinct giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus) in South Scandinavia has been continued (K. Aaris-Sørensen, with R. Liljegren, University of Lund) and one on the Late Glacial and Holocene history of the roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) has been completed (K. Aaris-Sørensen, with A.K. Hufthammer, University of Bergen).
A study of the dispersal and extinction pattern of the beaver (Castor fiber) in late- and post-glacial Scandinavia has been initiated (S.V. Gelskov, cand.scient.
www.zmuc.dk /commonweb/5yrs/1resea16.htm   (276 words)

  
 Vertebrate Palaeontology - Museum fuer Naturkunde Berlin
PFEIFFER, T. (1999c): Der Riesenhirsch, Megaloceros giganteus (BLUMENBACH 1799) von Schlutup bei Lübeck mit einer Analyse funktioneller Adaptionen des Skelettes.- Ber.
Langenstrassen, F. and PFEIFFER, T. (1999f): The morphological distinction of limb bones from Alces latifrons (JOHNSON 1874) and Megaloceros giganteus (BLUMENBACH 1799).- Kaupia, Darmstädter Beiträge zur Naturgeschichte 9 : 113-126, 11.
PFEIFFER, T. (2002): The first complete skeleton of Megaloceros verticornis (Dawkins, 1868) Cervidae, Mammalia, from Bilshausen (Lower Saxony, Germany): description and phylogenetic implications.- Mitt.
www.museum.hu-berlin.de /pal/vertp/thekla.pfeiffer.asp?lang=1   (396 words)

  
 Extinct Giant Deer Survived Ice Age, Study Says   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Now a new study, published tomorrow in the science journal Nature, suggests that another striking mammal, the Irish elk, likewise lived way beyond the last ice age.
The Irish elk is also known as the giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus).
Analysis of ancient bones and teeth by scientists based in Britain and Russia show the huge herbivore survived until about 5,000 B.C.—more than three millennia later than previously believed.
news.nationalgeographic.com /news/2004/10/1006_041006_giant_deer.html   (586 words)

  
 PALEONTOLOGY: ON ICE-AGE EXTINCTIONS
But the species survived on Wrangel Island in the northeastern Siberian Arctic until some 4000 years ago(1), making it contemporaneous with the Bronze Age Xia Dynasty in China.
Stuart et al(2) have reported that another charismatic ice-age mammal that was thought to have become extinct 10,000 years ago -- the giant deer or Irish elk (Megaloceros giganteus) -- survived in western Siberia to the dawn of historic times.
The finding lends weight to the idea that there is no one explanation for the so-called Pleistocene extinctions.
scienceweek.com /2004/sb041126-4.htm   (1553 words)

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