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Topic: Meiji Restoration


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In the News (Thu 25 Apr 19)

  
  MEIJI
Several entries in 1868 reveal an unusually close relationship between Kido (1833-1877), the Meiji statesman from Choshu, and Thomas Blake Glover (1838-1912), the British merchant from Nagasaki.
His joint venture with Tosa in the nearby Takashima coal mine, and his grandiose scheme to engage in shipbuilding, to enter shipping on the run to Shanghai, and to refire tea on a large scale, stirred suspicions among his creditors, mainly Jardine, Matheson, who foreclosed in 1870.
No less a person than Kido Takayoshi of Choshu was dispatched by the new Meiji government to Nagasaki to deal with these violators of the ancient ban on the alien religion in 1868.
www.uwosh.edu /home_pages/faculty_staff/earns/meiji.html   (3293 words)

  
  Meiji Restoration - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The defeat of the armies of the former shogun (led by Hijikata Toshizo) marked the end of the Meiji Restoration; all defiance to the emperor and his rule ended.
The Meiji Restoration was the catalyst towards industrialization in Japan that led to the rise of the island nation as a military power by 1905, under the slogan of "National Wealth and Military Strength" (fukoku kyohei, 富国強兵).
The Meiji oligarchy that formed the government under the rule of the Emperor first introduced measures to consolidate their power against the remnants of the Edo period government, the shogunate, daimyo and the samurai class.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Meiji_Restoration   (1175 words)

  
 Meiji period - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The first reform was the promulgation of the Five Charter Oath in 1868, a general statement of the aims of the Meiji leaders to boost morale and win financial support for the new government.
Inasmuch as the Meiji Restoration had sought to return the emperor to a preeminent position, efforts were made to establish a Shinto-oriented state much like the state of 1,000 years earlier.
One of the Meiji oligarchy, Ito Hirobumi (1841–1909), a Choshu native long involved in government affairs, was charged with drafting Japan's constitution.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Meiji_period   (2585 words)

  
 Meiji Restoration - Simple English Wikipedia
The Meiji Restoration is a term of history of Japan.
In (Japanese language Meiji-ishin is the term for Meiji Restoration.
The leaders of the Meiji Restoration acted in the name of Japan’s emperor and to restore (that is, to return) emperor’s powers.
simple.wikipedia.org /wiki/Meiji_Restoration   (361 words)

  
 AcademicDB - Meiji Restoration.
Meiji Restoration The Meiji Restoration was a period in Japan when massive changes occurred in ancient Japan.
The goal of the Meiji Restoration was summarised in the motto, " A rich country, a strong military".
The Meiji Restoration lasted from 1898, to 1912 (the death of the emperor), and during this time the modernising revolution of Japan took place, politically, socially, and economically.
www.academicdb.com /meiji_restoration_12320   (253 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Meiji restoration   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Meiji restoration MEIJI RESTORATION [Meiji restoration] The term refers to both the events of 1868 that led to the restoration of power to the emperor and the entire period of revolutionary changes that coincided with the Meiji emperor's reign (1868-1912).
Meiji MEIJI [Meiji], 1852-1912, reign name of the emperor of Japan from 1867 to 1912; his given name was Mutsuhito.
After the Meiji restoration (1868), Westernizers from the former Choshu and Satsuma domains came to power, abolishing feudalism and modernizing society.
www.encyclopedia.com /articles/08287.html   (659 words)

  
 The Meiji Restoration
He is the national representative of the spirit of Meiji in its early commitment to progress on the national level and success on the individual level.
Even in the Meiji period, by the end of the period, a geisha whose client had not paid, was capable of saying to him that he was unconstitutional.
But in the Meiji era, children joined their mothers and fathers in the burning, hot shafts of the island’s towering mountain of coal.
www.cla.calpoly.edu /~mriedlsp/History315/MeijiText.html   (4030 words)

  
 PlanetPapers - Meiji Restoration - Japan
The Meiji Restoration was period in Japan when massive changes in ancient Japan.
The goal of the Meiji Restoration was summarized in their motto, “A rich country, a strong military.” In their quest to do so, the Meiji looked to the western civilizations.
During Meiji Rule Japan modernized with great speed, this meant that the Meiji Restoration was a huge success.
www.planetpapers.com /Assets/3145.php   (471 words)

  
 Tokugawa Period’s Influence on Meiji Restoration
The Meiji period (1868-1912) brought about the rapid modernization of Japanese economic, political, and social institutions, which resulted in Japan's attaining the status of the leading country in Asia and a world economic and political power.
During the first half of the Meiji period, from 1868 to 1890, the Meiji oligarchs instituted numerous reforms to achieve domestic stability, promote industrialization, improve education, and establish an effective government structure, including the promulgation of a constitution in 1889.
Even though the Meiji oligarchs came from the samurai class, some samurai were not ready to surrender their privileged status in the Tokugawa class structure without a struggle.
wgordon.web.wesleyan.edu /papers/jhist1.htm   (1491 words)

  
 Meiji restoration - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
MEIJI RESTORATION [Meiji restoration] The term refers to both the events of 1868 that led to the "restoration" of power to the emperor and the entire period of revolutionary changes that coincided with the Meiji emperor's reign (1868-1912).
In the late Meiji years, Japan won the Sino-Japanese war in 1895, defeated Russia in 1905, abolished the treaties with the West, and became a world power.
Jingu Kogo ema in Southwestern Japan: reflections and anticipations of the seikanron debate in the late Tokugawa and early Meiji period.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-meijires.html   (528 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Meiji restoration (Japanese History) - Encyclopedia
Meiji restoration, The term refers to both the events of 1868 that led to the "restoration" of power to the emperor and the entire period of revolutionary changes that coincided with the Meiji emperor's reign (1868–1912).
The new Meiji government moved quickly to discard the feudal system and launch a series of reforms that profoundly changed Japanese society.
In the late Meiji years, Japan won the Sino–Japanese war in 1895, defeated Russia in 1905, abolished the treaties with the West, and became a world power.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/M/Meijires.html   (456 words)

  
 Meiji Restoration Links
The Meiji Restoration was not "revolutionary" in the traditional sense of being aimed at a specific social class, but, at the end of the day, the "aristocratic" samurai leaders acted in a revolutionary manner once they proceeded to reorganize the Japanese polity.
Norman argues that intrinsic to the Meiji Restoration was the late Tokugawa "feudal-merchant alliance" which grew out of the decay of Japanese feudalism and brought the rich merchant class into league with younger, middle-ranking samurai in order to cooperate in the overthrow of the shogunate.
From the point of view of the Meiji Government, the agrarian settlement was absolutely crucial, for it was the basis of the land tax which provided the bulk of government revenue throughout this early period.
www.willamette.edu /~rloftus/jhistmeijirest.html   (2234 words)

  
 Ridgeback Press - Terminology of Meiji Restoration   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Meiji government: Government in Japan after the fall of the Tokugawa Bakufu.
Meiji Restoration era: Fifteen years of bloody revolution (1853- 1868) at the dawn of modern Japan, culminating in the collapse of the Tokugawa Shogunate and the restoration of imperial rule.
During the Meiji Restoration era, the term ronin took on a new connotation, to include a samurai who had left his domain illegally (usually to fight in the Loyalist movement).
www.ridgebackpress.com /terms.htm   (867 words)

  
 Modern History: The Meiji Restoration and Modernization
The emperor took the name Meiji ("enlightened rule") as his reign name; this event was known as the Meiji Restoration.
The Reign of the Meiji Emperor: When the Meiji emperor was restored as head of Japan in 1868, the nation was a militarily weak country, was primarily agricultural, and had little technological development.
He was expected to accept the advice of the group that had overthrown the shôgun, and it was from this group that a small number of ambitious, able, and patriotic young men from the lower ranks of the samurai emerged to take control and establish the new political system.
afe.easia.columbia.edu /japan/japanworkbook/modernhist/meiji.html   (5121 words)

  
 Meiji Restoration 1868
The Meiji Restoration thus was the outcome of this coalition of merchant class with the lower samurai.
Thus, the Meiji Revolution was not the story of a rising business class which destroyed the structure of feudalism and established its supremacy in a mercantile state.
The ending of the Shogunate and the Restoration of the Emperor, however, was actually the beginning of a further struggle before peace was finally restored.
www.thecorner.org /hist/japan/meiji1.htm   (4234 words)

  
 Meiji restoration — Infoplease.com
Meiji restoration, The term refers to both the events of 1868 that led to the “restoration” of power to the emperor and the entire period of revolutionary changes that coincided with the
In the late Meiji years, Japan won the Sino–Japanese war in 1895, defeated Russia in 1905, abolished the treaties with the West, and became a world power.
Jingu Kogo ema in Southwestern Japan: reflections and anticipations of the seikanron debate in the late Tokugawa and early Meiji period....
www.infoplease.com /ce6/history/A0832538.html   (499 words)

  
 Meiji Restoration   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Revolution in Japan which toppled the Tokugawa shogunate, "restored" imperial rule, and transformed the country from a feudal into a modern state.
Russo-Japanese War, Meiji Japan won the right to be treated on a level with the Western imperialist powers.
Despite an astonishingly fast and successful modernization, the ambiguous constitutional structure, military orientation, and nationalist ideology bequeathed by the Meiji Restoration led Japan to the disastrous imperialist adventures of the 1930s and 1940s.
www.ox.compsoc.net /~gemini/simons/historyweb/meiji-resto.html   (473 words)

  
 The Meiji Restoration
The Meiji Restoration marked a turning point in Japanese history: when the Shoguns decided to end their dividedness and form coherent policies on how to interact with the Westerners.
The Meiji Restoration was the final overthrow of the Tokugawa shogunate and the restoration of the young Meiji Emperor to his proper central place in Japanese politics, although behind the scenes many pro-emperor samurai were actively devising national policies.
To a great extent, the Meiji Constitution was a conservative document that gave the people a certain amount of rights, but gave the emperor predominant power over the two houses.
www.indiana.edu /~hisdcl/h207_2002/meijirestorationnotes.htm   (625 words)

  
 Meiji Restoration - Japan Glossary
The aim of the rebellious samurai was consequently to restore the pride and power of Japan, by modernizing the country at all cost.
The Meiji Restoration saw the fast modernization and westernization of Japan, with many Japanese scholars and politicians (such as Ito Hirobumi or Saionji Kinmochi) sent to study the Western system and technologies in Europe and North America, and Westerners invited to Japan to help develop new industries.
In that sense, the Meiji Restoration was not just a political change, but a real cultural revolution.
www.jref.com /glossary/meiji_restoration.shtml   (224 words)

  
 Asiaweek.com | Business: China's 'Meiji Restoration' | 1/28/00
Meiji Japan busily sent missions around the world to observe everything from prisons to mine operations.
Tokyo (the capital was moved there from Kyoto under Meiji) assured foreign governments that it would continue to abide by previously negotiated treaties even though it regarded them as inequitable.
Don't forget, however, that in Meiji Japan, the gradual adoption of the rule of law over the rule of force was accompanied by the militarization of society and industry.
www.pathfinder.com /asiaweek/magazine/2000/0128/biz.viewpoint.html   (924 words)

  
 Ridgeback Press - Centers of the Meiji Restoration   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Kyoto was the home of the emperor and imperial court from A.D. 794 until shortly after the Meiji Restoration in 1868.
In the 1860s, the city was the center of Imperial Loyalism, the movement to overthrow the Tokugawa Bakufu and restore the emperor to his ancient seat of power.
Numerous leaders of the Meiji Restoration and the early Meiji government hailed from Satsuma.
www.ridgebackpress.com /center.htm   (814 words)

  
 3: Why do we begin with the Meiji restoration?
The Meiji Restoration and the defeat in the war both clearly illustrate the relationship between technology and political and social factors.
However, the political and social conditions of the restoration greatly differed from those of the defeat; the restoration was far more decisive for technology than the war as a turning point.
That is, the Meiji Restoration represented an attempt by an agrarian society to turn itself into an industrial society, whereas the post-war development meant a change in direction and an upgrading of levels in a society that was already basically industrial.
www.unu.edu /unupress/unupbooks/uu36je/uu36je06.htm   (1548 words)

  
 Meiji Restoration - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Meiji Restoration - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Meiji Restoration, political revolution in Japan that overthrew the Tokugawa shogunate (military government) in January 1868 and replaced it with a...
Meiji (1852-1912), emperor of Japan (1867-1912), whose accession to the throne marked the beginning of a national revolution known as the Meiji...
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/search.aspx?q=Meiji+Restoration   (67 words)

  
 Modern Japan
Not everyone in Japan agreed with this direction, of course, and the unrest that it provoked ultimately led to the downfall of the Tokugawa shogunate and the Meiji Restoration, in which the Emperor Meiji was "restored" to power.
Emperor Meiji and his followers sent envoys to these nations to examine their political systems, and the ideas that they brought back to Japan shaped the new government.
On the one hand, in order to modernize the government the new rulers would need to dismantle the old feudal system, which meant taking away the considerable privileges enjoyed by the aristocratic classes--although the new government posts were typically filled by these aristocrats, so they still wielded political power.
www.wsu.edu /~dee/MODJAPAN/INTRO.HTM   (1170 words)

  
 Emperor Meiji and the Meiji Restoration - Japanese Culture
Emperor Meiji and the Meiji Restoration - Japanese Culture
Emperor Meiji was born in 1852 as Prince Mutsuhito.
Emperor Meiji wanted desperately both to help the lack of education and money of his people, and to become strong enough as a nation to hold its own against the western countries who were currently taking advantage of Japan.
www.bellaonline.com /articles/art15655.asp   (369 words)

  
 Japanese history: Meiji Period
The emperor Meiji was moved from Kyoto to Tokyo which became the new capital; his imperial power was restored.
A parliament, the Diet was established while the emperor kept sovereignty: he stood at the top of the army, navy, executive and legislative power.
In 1912 emperor Meiji died, and the era of the ruling clique of elder statesmen (genro) was about to end.
www.japan-guide.com /e/e2130.html   (690 words)

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