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Topic: Mel Blanc


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In the News (Thu 21 Mar 19)

  
  Mel Blanc's grave
Blanc's most memorable routine from Benny's radio and TV programs is called "Sy, the little Mexican" in which he spoke one word at a time.
Blanc was one of hundreds of individuals that George Lucas auditioned to provide the voice for the character of C-3PO for his 1977 motion picture Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, and it was he who ultimately suggested that the producers utilize mime actor Anthony Daniels' own voice in the role.
Blanc died in Los Angeles, California, and is interred in the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood, California.
www.hollywoodusa.co.uk /ForeverObituaries/melblanc.htm   (1537 words)

  
  Mel Blanc - Biography - Moviefone
For nearly three decades, Blanc was closely associated with the radio and TV output of comedian Jack Benny, essaying such roles as the "Si-Sy-Si" Mexican, harried violin teacher Professor LeBlanc, Polly the parrot, and the sputtering Maxwell automobile.
In the 1970s, Blanc and his actor/producer son Noel -- whom Mel was grooming to take over the roles of Bugs, Daffy and the rest -- ran their own school for voice actors.
Mel Blanc continued performing right up to his death in July of 1989; earlier that same year, he published his autobiography, That's Not All, Folks.
movies.aol.com /celebrity/mel-blanc/6641/biography   (592 words)

  
 Mel Blanc Info - Bored Net - Boredom   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Blanc's famous role on Benny's TV show was as "Si, the Mexican" in which he spoke one word at a time.
Daws Butler and Don Messick were Hanna-Barbera's top voice men and Mel was the newcomer to H-B. However, all of the '30s and '40s theatrical cartoons from Warner Brothers were making their way to Saturday morning TV to compete with the made-for-TV Hanna-Barbera's and Mel was once more deemed relevant.
Blanc's last original character was an orange cat called "Heathcliff", who spoke a little like his famed "Bugs Bunny" but with a more street tough demeanor.
www.borednet.com /e/n/encyclopedia/m/me/mel_blanc.html   (717 words)

  
 Mel Blanc - Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Blanc actually ad-libbed most of his dialogue, as the record was Boone's version of a song recorded by another artist earlier that year, in which the "Speedy Gonzalez" character had very little dialogue.
According to his son Noel Blanc, of all the cartoon characters he voiced, the one that was the closest to his actual voice was "Sylvester the Cat", only without the lisp.
Mel, who was raised in Portland, OR, became friends with the famous Big Band singer Kay St. Germain Wells who was born and raised in Portland.
www.imdb.com /name/nm0000305/bio   (1366 words)

  
 Mel Blanc
Blanc's ability to create voices for multiple characters first attracted attention when he worked as a voice actor in radio.
Blanc also appeared on other national radio programs, and later played various small part on Benny's television show.
Mel Blanc joined Leon Schlesinger Studios (the subsidiary of Warner Brothers Pictures which produced animated cartoons) in 1936.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/me/Mel_Blanc.html   (226 words)

  
 Mel Blanc
Mel Blanc was the voice man of the century.
Mel Blanc was born in SanFrancisco but moved to Portland at a very young age.
Mel danced with another girl but she saw how obvious it was that he wanted to dance with her friend so she set them up.
www.ochcom.org /blanc   (1668 words)

  
 Mel Blanc - Free net encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Blanc was working as a voice actor in radio when his ability to create voices for multiple characters first attracted attention.
Blanc was one of hundreds of individuals that George Lucas auditioned to provide the voice for the character of C-3PO for his 1977 motion picture Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, and it was he who ultimately suggested that the producers utilize mime actor Anthony Daniels' own voice in the role.
Blanc died in Los Angeles, California, and is interred in the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood, California.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Mel_Blanc   (1497 words)

  
 Mel Blanc - Biography - Pun of the Day
Born in San Francisco in 1908, Mel Blanc was the famed voice of popular and beloved animated cartoon characters, including Bugs Bunny, Woody Woodpecker, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Pie, Sylvester, and many others.
Known as The Man of 1,000 Voices, Blanc's voice as these cartoon characters became instantly recognizable to generations of children starting with the golden era of Merrie Melodies cartoons by Warner Brothers.
Blanc took over the role in Porky's Duck Hunt, stuttering intact, and created Daffy Duck at the same time.
www.punoftheday.com /mel-blanc.html   (298 words)

  
 Mel Blanc   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Mel Blanc was the man of 1,000 cartoon voices.
Blanc started as a musician with NBC Radio, and later played the violin, tuba and bass with various bands.
Blanc was born Melvin Jerome Blanc on June 30, 1908 (some sources say 1892), in San Francisco, CA.
www.cemeteryguide.com /blanc.html   (212 words)

  
 Mel Blanc | Retro Junk
Mel Blanc is the legendary and probably most famous voice actor who ever lived.
In 1961, Mel was involved in a car accident that put him in a coma.
Mel said in his autobiography that his doctor asked Bugs to wake up in which Mel awoke and began talkin in Bugs voice.
www.retrojunk.com /details_person/279   (297 words)

  
 Mel Blanc
The great skill of Mel Blanc was as an actor: It is one thing to affect a funny voice — quite another to mold a coherent, believable characterization with it and to wring every drop of humor out of every line.
Mel had been driving up on Sunset Boulevard, not far from where we lived, when a car crossed the center divider and hit him head-on, breaking every bone in his body.
The official story was that Mel never missed an episode; that recording equipment was hauled into the room where he lay in a full-body cast and he recorded the role of Barney from that position.
www.povonline.com /cols/COL133.htm   (2147 words)

  
 Mel Blanc St. James Encyclopedia of Pop Culture - Find Articles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Mel Blanc, the "Man of a thousand voices," helped to develop animated cartoons into a new comedic art form by creating and performing the voices of hundreds of characters for cartoons,; radio, and television.
Of the Warner Brothers characters, Blanc has described the voice of Yosemite Sam as the most difficult to perform, saying that it was like "screaming at the top of your lungs for an hour and a half." Another voice that required a lot of volume was Foghorn Leghorn.
According to Blanc, this voice is closest to his natural speaking voice, but "without the thspray." In his autobiography, Blanc revealed one of the little known tricks used by engineers to manipulate the voices for characters such as Daffy Duck,; Henery Hawk, Speedy Gonzales, and Tweety.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_g1epc/is_bio/ai_2419200107   (1050 words)

  
 Mel Blanc OTR MP3 List   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Mel Blanc voice is still heard around the world every day, thanks to the constant replay of the great Warner Brothers cartoons.
Mel got the chance to do his own show at the height of his Bugs and Benny stature, and the show sounds like it was made in the Benny mold.
Mel plays himself as a young, somewhat innocent small town character, but because of Bugs, that really doesn't work as well as it did for Dennis Day, another Benny regular to did his own radio show.
www.otrcat.com /melblanc.htm   (406 words)

  
 Mel Blanc - Obituary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Although his lines were primarily written by others, Blanc's performances, like those of the Three Stooges and Marx Brothers, gave life and technicolor to a spirit of wise-aleckness in an era of gray flannel suits and proper manners.
Blanc's first major memorable role was that of Porky Pig, which he was offered in 1937 after studio officials decided that the porcine personality, who was originally introduced in 1935, needed a face-lift.
Blanc also had bit parts in several movies and starred in his own forgettable comedy CBS Radio network show in 1946, in which he played the owner of a fix-it shop.
one_foggy.tripod.com /blancobit.html   (1882 words)

  
 GAC Forums - some Mel Blanc questions
Mel's Porky Pig's voice was also speeded up when recording his lines.
Warner Bros. wanted Blanc's versatile talents exclusively for their films, so they gave him exclusive "Vocal Characterization" credit starting with 1944's "Little Red Riding Rabbit" (Blanc was famous as the voice of Bugs Bunny, so only those cartoons had his name in the credits, until "Ain't That Ducky").
To be slightly fair to the other voice actors, Mel Blanc was only credited on films he did voices in, but not even in those films were the other actors credited.
forums.goldenagecartoons.com /showthread.php?t=822   (659 words)

  
 Mel Blanc - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Melvin Jerome Blanc (May 30, 1908 – July 10, 1989) was a prolific American voice actor, performing on radio, in television commercials, and most famously, in hundreds of cartoon shorts for Warner Bros. and Hanna-Barbara during the Golden Age of American animation.
Less problematic was the retention of older recordings of Blanc as Uncle Orville and a pet bird in the 1994 update of the Carousel of Progress attraction at Walt Disney World, despite cast changes in other roles.
What could be a cartoon version of Mel Blanc appears in a Bugs Bunny short of a Bowry saloon keeper who has the gorilla bouncer throw Steve Brody out into the street.
en.wikipedia.org /?title=Mel_Blanc   (2643 words)

  
 Mel Blanc Biography :: Hollywood.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
Blanc’s earliest contribution to the studio was in a 1937 short called “Porky’s Road Race.” The eponymous star of that film was a portly, stuttering pig with a heart of gold – Porky Pig.
Of the many clients Blanc provided services for, none was more affected than “The Flintstones.” Blanc awoke from his coma soon after, but was confined to bed for the next year in a full-body cast.
Blanc’s output diminished appreciably in the 1970’s and 1980’s, as his age began to catch up with him.
www.hollywood.com /celebs/fulldetail/id/199700   (1437 words)

  
 Blanc, Mel :: B : Gourt
Melvin Jerome Blanc (May 30, 1908 – July 10, 1989), was a famous American voice actor for both classic American radio programs and many animation studios, primarily the Warner Bros. and Hanna-Barbera studios.
Rest In Peace, Mel Blanc - Photos of his final resting place, with an area map you can download to visit the gravesite.
The Warner Bros Cartoon Companion: Blanc, Mel - From E.O. Costello's invaluable WB toon encyclopedia - a few paragraphs of biographical data.
arts.gourt.com /Animation/Voice-Actors/B/Blanc,-Mel.html   (552 words)

  
 Mel Blanc
Blanc’s most memorable routine from Benny’s program is called “Sy, the little Mexican” in which he spoke one word at a time.
Blanc’s last original character was an orange cat named Heathcliff; this was in the early 1980s.
Blanc died on July 10, 1989, from cardiovascular disease, in Los Angeles, California.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/biography/Mel_Blanc.html   (381 words)

  
 Mel Blanc
A voice specialist from radio, movies and TV, Blanc was rarely seen by his audience although widely recognized as the voice of virtually every major Warner Brothers cartoon character except Elmer Fudd.
Joining the Warner Bros. studio in 1936 (1937?), Blanc's voice was also featured as the original voice of Woody Woodpecker in 1940.
One of Blanc's favoured charities was the Shrine Hospital Children's Burn Center.
freemasonry.bcy.ca /biography/blanc_m/blanc_m.html   (207 words)

  
 MEL BLANC - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED
On his personal "Mel Blanc" stationery with a pale green head of Bugs Bunny in the center.
They show a few of the characters whose voices I created." In 1937, Mel Blanc was hired to provide the voice for a drunken bull in the Warner Bros.
Blanc signed to work exclusively at Warners in the early 1940s.
www.galleryofhistory.com /archive/6_2002/actors_actresses/MEL_BLANC.htm   (265 words)

  
 Don Markstein's Toonopedia: Mel Blanc
Even as a young boy, Mel Blanc was preparing for what would become his life's work.
It would not be much of an exaggeration to state that Mel Blanc invented the profession of cartoon voice acting.
But, tho he did a little "face acting" and a little music making, Blanc was mainly a voice man — and the very first to receive screen credit in that capacity.
www.toonopedia.com /blanc.htm   (665 words)

  
 Boston.com / A&E / Celebrity news / Noel Blanc honors famous dad Mel
When Mel Blanc died in 1989, his legacy for providing words from the mouths of animated characters such as Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig, was passed to son, Noel Blanc.
LOS ANGELES -- When Mel Blanc died in 1989, his legacy for providing words from the mouths of animated characters such as Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig, was passed to son, Noel Blanc.
The lithographs are companion pieces to a memorial commemorative lithograph produced when Mel Blanc died in July 1989.
www.boston.com /ae/celebrity/articles/2003/10/17/noel_blanc_honors_famous_dad_mel   (312 words)

  
 Mel Blanc - AOL Music   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
For his contribution to radio, Mel Blanc has a star on the Hollywood Walk of...
It should be noted that Mel Blanc told fans of the cartoon characters that...
Download, listen and watch Mel Blanc music, mp3's, song lyrics, music videos, Internet radio, live performances, concerts, and more on AOL Music.
music.aol.com /artist/mel-blanc/57213/main?_pgtyp=pdct   (92 words)

  
 Dean's World - Mel Blanc, Not Brooks
Mel Blanc voiced very nearly all the great Warner Brothers cartoon characters, including Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Sylvester, Tweetie, Speedy Gonzales, Foghorn Leghorn, Yosemite Sam, Porky Pig, and a host of others, including, yes, Private Snafu.
Blanc was also a regular on Jack Benny's classic radio and television shows.
But I'll leave up my tribute to the great Mel Blanc, because he was a truly great performer, one of the few to achieve genuine immortality with his voice alone.
www.deanesmay.com /posts/1151370588.shtml   (323 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
From 1936 and on Blanc was the key to the voices of the Warner Characters.
Whether it was Bugs Bunny's "What's up Doc", or Porky's studering "That's All Folks" Blanc always delivered the goods.
Often refered to as the man with 1000 voices, clearly his talent gave a timeless personality to his characters.
www.nonstick.com /wdocs/blanc.html   (53 words)

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