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Topic: Melastomataceae


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  Melastomataceae of the World - Literature   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Groger, A., and Renner, S.S. Leaf anatomy and ecology of the Guyana endemics Acanthella sprucei and A. pulchra (Melastomataceae).
Larson, B.M.H., and Barrett, S.C.H. The pollination ecology of buzz-pollinated Rhexia virginica (Melastomataceae).
Michelangeli, F.A. Lectotypifications in the genus Tococa aublet (Melastomataceae).
www.flmnh.ufl.edu /natsci/herbarium/melastomes/melastome_literature_table.htm   (7082 words)

  
 Flowering Plant Families, UH Botany
The Melastomataceae are herbs, shrubs, or trees comprising about 200 genera and 4,000 species that are further characterized by having the major leaf veins usually 3-9 palmate and running in a parallel fashion from the base of the blade to near the leaf tip.
The leaves are opposite and decussate or rarely alternate by abortion of one of the members of a pair; stipules are absent.
This is one of several species of Melastomataceae that threatens the native Hawaiian flora.
www.botany.hawaii.edu /faculty/carr/melastomat.htm   (349 words)

  
 Molecular phylogenetics of Melastomataceae and Memecylaceae: implications for character evolution -- Clausing and ...
genus of Melastomataceae endemic in the northern hemisphere.
Maxwell, J. 1981 A revision of the genus Pternandra (Melastomataceae).
1993 Phylogeny and classification of the Melastomataceae and Memecylaceae.
www.amjbot.org /cgi/content/full/88/3/486   (5610 words)

  
 Ferns and Melastomataceae as indicators of vascular plant composition in rain forests of Colombian Amazonia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
In principle, therefore, ferns and Melastomataceae can be used to detect and forecast changes in the forest composition of the study area.
However, evidence was not obtained that ferns and Melastomataceae show more potential to predict the main patterns in species composition of forests than soil, landscape, and spatial variables.
Direct effects of ferns and Melastomataceae on other plants might be obtained from experimental studies of between-plant interactions, concentrating on the seedling or juvenile stages of trees and lianas, both above-ground as well as in the rooting environment.
www.trophort.com /information/data/B03/S35/DUQ05FER1X11827.html   (319 words)

  
 Jahrbuch-CD der MPG 2003 - The structure of ground beetle
The most abundant species, N. glabrata, was found to be a Melastomataceae seed generalist, while N. maxima seemed to prefer the seeds of Bellucia, and N. aulica and N. umbrifera the seeds of Miconia.
The seed-feeding Notiobia species, which specialize on Melastomataceae, used fruit falls of figs as migratory "stepping stones" during periods when there were no Melastomataceae fruit falls.
Among the Melastomataceae, carabid species richness was highest at Miconia fruit falls and lowest at Loreya fruit falls.
www.mpg.de /forschungsergebnisse/wissVeroeffentlichungen/archivListenJahrbuch/2002/22/publZIM67.html   (322 words)

  
 PBIO 450 Lecture Notes - Rosidae -- Spring 1998
There is general agreement that Alzateaceae, Crypteroniaceae and Rhynchocalycaceae, often associated with Melastomataceae, are distinct families in their own right with Crypteroniaceae being the focal point for the other two segregates.
The ovary is usually 2-5-carpelled and 1-5-locular in the Memecylaceae while, in the Melastomataceae, the ovary is typically has 3-5 carpels and locules and only rarely is the ovary 1-locular.
In Melastomataceae, the anthers typical are poricidal and only rarely is the dehiscences by longitudinal slits.
www.life.umd.edu /emeritus/reveal/PBIO/pb450/rosi08.html   (1171 words)

  
 Clausing, Gudrun* and Susanne S. Renner.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Melastomataceae are a tropical eudicot family of about 156 genera and 4500 species.
Our poster presents a phylogenetic hypothesis for Melastomataceae and their closest relatives, Memecylaceae, Crypteroniaceae, Alzateaceae, Rhynchocalycaceae, Oliniaceae, and Penaeaceae, based on combined rbcL, ndhF, and rpl16 sequences and parsimony, minimum evolution, and maximum likelihood reconstructions.
Memecylaceae are sister to Melastomataceae, and Pternandra, a SE Asian genus of 15 species, is the first-branching Melastomataceae.
www.ou.edu /cas/botany-micro/botany2000/section13/abstracts/225.shtml   (214 words)

  
 Historical biogeography of Melastomataceae: the roles of Tertiary migration and long-distance dispersal -- Renner et ...
Historical biogeography of Melastomataceae: the roles of Tertiary migration and long-distance dispersal -- Renner et al.
Historical biogeography of Melastomataceae: the roles of Tertiary migration and long-distance dispersal
Collinson M. Pingen 1992 Seeds of the Melastomataceae from the Miocene of Central Europe.
www.amjbot.org /cgi/content/full/88/7/1290   (4804 words)

  
 NYBG.org: Fabian A. Michelangeli Profile
This type of associations are present in over 80 species of Melastomataceae and have evolved independently in different lineages.
A preliminary phylogeny of the tribe Miconieae (Melastomataceae) based on nrITS sequence data and its implications on inflorescence position.
Absence of cyanogenic glycosides in the tribe Miconieae (Melastomataceae).
sciweb.nybg.org /science2/Profile_63.asp   (449 words)

  
 The structure of ground beetle assemblages (Coleoptera: Carabidae) at fruit falls of Melastomataceae trees in a ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Although most Carabidae are recognized as predacious, recent studies have shown that some tropical rain forest Carabidae use the small seeds of fallen fruit from some tree species as a key food resource (particularly figs (Moraceae) but also those from other families).
Assemblages of carabid beetles at fruit falls of the Melastomataceae tree genera, i.e.
The presence of larvae indicated the reproduction of N. glabrata at fruit falls of all three tree genera and the reproduction of N. maxima at those of Bellucia.
www.trophort.com /information/data/B01/S19/PAA02THE3682128.html   (399 words)

  
 Manakins and the Melastomataceae. A mutualism of neotropical birds and plants.
Their abundance stems from the fact that they feed almost entirely on a very plentiful and easily-found food: the fruits of trees and shrubs growing in the forest, especially those of the plant family Melastomataceae (Krijger et al.
The Melastomataceae is the seventh largest family of flowering plants, with approximately 5000 species (Renner 1989).
A great diversity of bird species besides manakins eat the fruits of the Melastomataceae, and it is generally recognized that these plants are some of the most important sources of food for small frugivorous birds in general (Stiles and Rosselli 1993).
www.ecology.info /manakins-melastomataceae.htm   (1558 words)

  
 Phylogeny and circumscription of the near-endemic Brazilian tribe Microlicieae (Melastomataceae) -- Fritsch et al. 91 ...
Melastomataceae are nearly all endemic to the cerrado biome
Clausing G. Renner 2001 Molecular phylogenetics of Melastomataceae and Memecylaceae: implications for character evolution.
Renner S. Clausing K. Meyer 2001 Historical biogeography of Melastomataceae: the roles of Tertiary migration and long-distance dispersal.
www.amjbot.org /cgi/content/full/91/7/1105   (4629 words)

  
 GBIF portal: GBIF Seed Money to Support Two Consortia of Scientists to Develop Global Catalogues of Plants
The Melastomataceae occur in all tropical biomes, are abundant, ecologically important, and comprise many horticulturally important species.
Melastomataceae comprise an estimated 3000 "good" species in the Neotropics, 240 in Africa, 230 on Madagascar, and about 1000 in Asia.
The participating taxonomists are leading specialists on Melastomataceae, and MelList will be a pilot for collaborative taxonomic revision, done interactively in real-time by multiple users on a single data base.
www.gbif.org /Stories/STORY1141828042   (381 words)

  
 Ferns and the Melastomataceae as indicators of phytogeographic patterns in Amazonia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Ferns and the Melastomataceae as indicators of phytogeographic patterns in Amazonia
Floristic comparisons were made between 12 study plots in Peruvian Amazonia on the basis of the distribution of forest trees with a diameter at breast height >2.5 cm, terrestrial ferns and Melastomataceae.
The results suggest that both ferns and Melastomataceae are promising candidates for serving as indicators of general phytogeographic patterns within the Amazonian forests.
www.trophort.com /information/data/B01/S68/RUO96FERREA0378.html   (99 words)

  
 Melastomataceae of the World   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
The Melastomataceae are the seventh largest family of flowering plants.
The Melastomataceae are particularly notable for their diversity of hair types and modifications of the androecium (stamens).
Despite being a very conspicuous component of most tropical ecosystems, their patterns of explosive evolution, intriguing biogeography and natural history, the Melastomataceae remain, to a large degree, an understudied family.
www.flmnh.ufl.edu /natsci/herbarium/melastomes   (324 words)

  
 Melastomataceae Home Page
The Melastomataceae are an almost exclusively tropical plant family with about 4500 species.
Biologically, they are interesting because of the repeated evolution of various plant-animal mutualisms in the group, involving defense and/or nutrition by ants, buzz pollination by bees, and seed dispersal by birds, fish, reptiles, and mammals.
There are also pages with literature, links about Melastomataceae, and about people working on melastomes.
www.uni-mainz.de /FB/Biologie/Botanikspeziell/web_old/Botanikspeziell/oldPages/Melastomataceae/index.html   (162 words)

  
 CAS CURATOR - FRANK ALMEDA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Species of Melastomataceae that offer pollen, floral oils, and fragrances as rewards to attract pollinators seem adapted for pollination by various species of bees, whereas the rarer nectar-producing species are visited by hummingbirds, bats, and rats.
Information on chromosome numbers has only recently begun to be used in systematic studies of the Melastomataceae, but it promises to be useful in determining generic relationships and in pointing out patterns of evolutionary change in other important morphological characteristics.
In conjunction with DNA studies, chromosome cytology is shedding light on the historical biogeography and phylogeny of the family.
www.calacademy.org /research/curators/almeda.htm   (523 words)

  
 Use of Melastomataceae and pteridophytes for revealing phytogeographical patterns in Amazonian rain forests   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Similarities and differences among 8 upland rain forest sites in Peruvian Amazonia (all within 150 km of Iquitos) were measured separately using Melastomataceae, pteridophyte and tree species compositions and edaphic characteristics of the sites.
The results suggest that both pteridophytes and Melastomataceae can be used as indicators of floristically different rain forest types that are edaphically defined.
Distribution patterns of these plant groups can be studied much more rapidly than the patterns of trees, and therefore both Melastomataceae and pteridophytes may be used in large-scale phytogeographical studies that are urgently needed in the face of rapidly advancing deforestation.
www.trophort.com /information/data/B01/S68/RUO97USE2430985.html   (179 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Melastomataceae: Information/Images from the University of Hawaii - Manoa)
Melastomataceae: Family treatment from Trees and Shrubs of the Andes of Ecuador
Melastomataceae: An invasive weed in Hawaii: Miconia calvescens
www.csdl.tamu.edu /FLORA/cgi/gateway_family?fam=Melastomataceae   (257 words)

  
 Melastomataceae of the World - Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Frank Almeda has completed the treatment of the Melastomataceae for this project.
Acre, Brazil - This collections database is part of a NYBG floristics and economic botany project.
Melastomataceae for Flora of Thailand - This project has recently been completed and this treatment is now in press.
www.flmnh.ufl.edu /natsci/herbarium/melastomes/melastome_research_table.htm   (167 words)

  
 California Academy of Sciences - Science Now   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Even with about 5,000 described species in the princess family, Melastomataceae, Almeda has returned from every expedition to Mesoamerica with a species new to science, making the Academy's collection from this region the most comprehensive in the world.
Topobea fragrantissima in the Melastomataceae family (named by Dr. Almeda).
The flower is unusual for its sweet fragrance and was found in Fortuna, Panama.
calacademy.org /science_now/archive/academy_research/frank_almeda.html   (332 words)

  
 Aluminium Accumulation in Leaves of 127 Species in Melastomataceae, with Comments on the Order Myrtales -- JANSEN et ...
Melastomataceae, systematic trends might be evident as all or
The distribution of Al accumulation plotted on the strict consensus tree for Melastomataceae and Memecylaceae based on rbcL, ndhF and rpl16 data (Clausing and Renner, 2001); data summarized from Table 1; the nominator gives the number of Al-accumulating specimens, the denominator is the total number of specimens tested.
Phylogeny and classification of the Melastomataceae and Memecylaceae.
aob.oxfordjournals.org /cgi/content/full/90/1/53   (5799 words)

  
 Melastomataceae in Trees and shrubs of the Andes of Ecuador @ efloras.org
Melastomataceae in Trees and shrubs of the Andes of Ecuador @ efloras.org
La familia Melastomataceae tiene amplia distribución en las zonas tropicales y subtropicales, consta de unos 200 géneros y unas 4500 especies.
Renner, S. Melastomataceae in Ecuador — what is new since 1980?, en: S. Lægaard y F. Borchsenius (eds.), Nordic Botanical Research in the Andes and Western Amazonia.
www.efloras.org /florataxon.aspx?flora_id=201&taxon_id=10554   (392 words)

  
 IPNI Plant Name Query Results   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Melastomataceae Memecylon arnhemensis Whiffin -- Flora of Australia 18 8 Jun. 1990 (APNI)
Melastomataceae Memecylon batekeanum R.D.Stone and G.M.Walters -- Novon 16(2): 277 (276-280; fig.
Melastomataceae Memecylon hylandii Whiffin -- Flora of Australia 18 8 Jun. 1990 (APNI)
www.ipni.org /ipni/IpniServlet?family=&infrafamily=&genus=Memecylon&infragenus=&species=&infraspecies=&author_abbrev=&publication_title=&is_apni_record=on&is_gci_record=on&is_ik_record=on&include_authors=on&include_basionym_authors=on&query_type=by_query   (110 words)

  
 Distribution of Medinilla magnifica (Melastomataceae) in the Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Distribution of Medinilla magnifica (Melastomataceae) in the Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96
Status of Medinilla magnifica (Melastomataceae) on the main Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96
This map illustrates the estimated distribution of Medinilla magnifica (Melastomataceae) in the main Hawaiian Islands (U.S.A.).
www.hear.org /AlienSpeciesInHawaii/maps/MedMagHI.htm   (578 words)

  
 Graffenrieda emarginata (Melastomataceae) forms mycorrhizas with Glomeromycota and with a member of the Hymenoscyphus ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Graffenrieda emarginata (Melastomataceae) forms mycorrhizas with Glomeromycota and with a member of the Hymenoscyphus ericae aggregate in the organic soil of a neotropical mountain rain forest
Graffenrieda emarginata (Melastomataceae) was found to be the most frequent tree on the nutrient-poor organic soil in a species-rich tropical mountain rain forest of southern Ecuador.
Our studies revealed that the rootlets are symbiotically associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas displaying a superficial Hartig net but no hyphal mantle.
www.trophort.com /information/data/B01/S07/HAU04GRA3400806.html   (179 words)

  
 Distribution of Tibouchina herbacea (Melastomataceae) in the Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Distribution of Tibouchina herbacea (Melastomataceae) in the Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96
Status of Tibouchina herbacea (Melastomataceae) on the main Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96
This map illustrates the estimated distribution of Tibouchina herbacea (Melastomataceae) in the main Hawaiian Islands (U.S.A.).
www.hear.org /AlienSpeciesInHawaii/maps/TibHerHI.htm   (564 words)

  
 Distribution of Medinilla venosa (Melastomataceae) in the Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Distribution of Medinilla venosa (Melastomataceae) in the Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96
Status of Medinilla venosa (Melastomataceae) on the main Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96
This map illustrates the estimated distribution of Medinilla venosa (Melastomataceae) in the main Hawaiian Islands (U.S.A.).
www.hear.org /AlienSpeciesInHawaii/maps/MedVenHI.htm   (564 words)

  
 Distribution of Pterolepis glomerata (Melastomataceae) in the Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Distribution of Pterolepis glomerata (Melastomataceae) in the Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96
Status of Pterolepis glomerata (Melastomataceae) on the main Hawaiian Islands as of 08/96
This map illustrates the estimated distribution of Pterolepis glomerata (Melastomataceae) in the main Hawaiian Islands (U.S.A.).
www.hear.org /AlienSpeciesInHawaii/maps/PteGloHI.htm   (564 words)

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