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Topic: Members of the Canadian House of Commons


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
  Canadian House of Commons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The House of Commons (in French, la Chambre des communes) is the lower, directly elected house of the Parliament of Canada which sits in the nation's capital, Ottawa, Ontario.
However, the actual formal selection of prime minister is not made by the House of Commons in a vote; rather they are appointed by the governor general, who selects the person he or she deems most likely to command the support of the House of Commons.
Each day there is the question period where members of the opposition parties grill the government on their policies and on the state of the nation.
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/c/ca/canadian_house_of_commons.html   (846 words)

  
 Canadian House of Commons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The House of Commons came into existence in 1867, when the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed the British North America Act, uniting the Province of Canada (which was separated into Quebec and Ontario), Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick into a single federation, called the Dominion of Canada.
The new Canadian Parliament consisted of the Queen (represented by the Governor General), the Senate and the House of Commons.
Members of the House of Commons may use the post-nominal letters "MP." The annual salary of each Member of Parliament, as of 2005, is $144,100; members may receive additional salaries in right of other offices they hold (for instance, the Speakership).
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Canadian_House_of_Commons   (3903 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Canadian-House-of-Commons
Canadian Sergeant-at-arms Gus Cloutier holding the ceremonial mace to open a sitting of the 38th Canadian parliament with Prime Minister Paul Martin in background (9/4/04) A Serjeant at Arms (also spelt Sergeant at Arms, and sometimes Serjeant-at-Arms) is an officer appointed by a deliberative...
Alternatively, the House may end debate more quickly by passing a motion for "closure." The Leader of the Opposition in Canada is the Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition).
In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Canadian_House_of_Commons   (7693 words)

  
 Canadian House of Commons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The House of Commons (the Commons) is the lower, directly elected house of the Parliament of Canada which sits in the nation's capital, Ottawa, Ontario.
The speaker of the House of Commons is elected from amongst the MPs by secret ballot after each general election by the members of Parliament.
Each afternoon there is the question period where members of the opposition parties grill the government on their policies and on the state of the nation.
usapedia.com /c/canadian-house-of-commons.html   (798 words)

  
 Canadian House of Commons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
However, the actual formal selection of prime minister is not made by the House of Commons in a vote; rather they are appointed by the governor general, who selects the person deemed most likely to command the support of the House of Commons.
Although the House of Commons is not involved in the formal selection process of the prime minister or Cabinet, as in other parliamentary democracies, it does have the ability to vote no confidence or to reject Supply, and then the prime minister must resign.
The main role of the House of Commons in practise is as a forum for members to debate government policy.
www.33beat.com /Canadian_House_of_Commons.html   (1034 words)

  
 Canadian House of Commons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
It is often misunderstood that "Commons" is a shortening of the word "commoners"; in reality, the term "Commons" derives from the Norman French word communes, meaning "localities." Canada remains the only nation besides the United Kingdom to use the name "House of Commons" for the Lower House of Parliament.
The last non-incumbent independent to win was Gilles Duceppe in a 1990 by-election, although Duceppe was informally representing the Bloc Quebecois, which was not yet registered as a political party with Elections Canada when the by-election was held.
If a member ceases to be qualified, or resigns, his or her seat falls vacant.
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Canadian_House_of_Commons   (3940 words)

  
 Canadian House of Commons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
However the actual formal selection of P.M. isn't made by the House of Commons in a vote; rather they are appointed by the Governor-General[?] who selects the person he or she deems most likely to command the support of the House of Commons.
Each afternoon there is the question period[?] where members of the oppostion party grill the government on their policies and on the state of the nation.
When voting on Bills the House of Commons members, as in other legislative bodies in the Westminister system, almost invariably vote along with their party, and the legislature in practice has very little discretion over the passage of legislation.
www.termsdefined.net /ca/canadian-house-of-commons.html   (980 words)

  
 Guide to the Canadian House of Commons
By understanding how the House of Commons works, Canadians will be in a better position to judge the performance of their representatives and to see how they themselves can participate in our system of government.
Members who voted for the bill at second reading may sometimes change their minds at third reading after seeing what amendments have or have not been made to the bill.
Members can look at bills in greater depth than is possible in the Chamber, where there is a large group of people involved and a full timetable.
nides.bc.ca /Assignments/Canada/Paper12/HouseofCommons.htm   (3236 words)

  
 Category:Members of the Canadian House of Commons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Historical Members of the Canadian House of Commons
Members of the Canadian House of Commons by political party
Members of the Canadian House of Commons by province
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Category:Members_of_the_Canadian_House_of_Commons   (507 words)

  
 Gerald Regan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
He was first elected to the House of Commons in the 1963 federal election.
Regan returned to the federal House of Commons in the 1980 federal election, and was appointed Minister of Labour and Minister of State for International Trade in the Cabinet of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau.
Members of the Canadian House of Commons from Nova Scotia
www.1bx.com /en/Gerald_A._Regan.htm   (374 words)

  
 Canadian House of Commons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The House of Commons''' (in French, '''la Chambre des communes) is the directly elected lower house of the Parliament of CanadaParliament of Canada which sits in the nation's capital of Ottawa, Ontario/.
Although the House of Commons is not involved in the formal selection process of the prime minister or Cabinet, as in other parliamentary democracies, it does have the ability to vote no confidence or to reject Loss of SupplySupply, and then the prime minister must resign.
House officers and members are assisted by the Canadian House of Commons Page Programparliamentary pages/, who carry messages to the members in the Chamber.
www.infothis.com /find/Canadian_House_of_Commons   (1356 words)

  
 Canadian House of Commons
The Members of Parliament holding these offices continue to represent their constituencies to the extent possible under a strict party system and continue to ensure that their voters’ concerns are advanced to the right places while carrying out the added responsibilities of their appointment.
Members receive an annual sessional allowance of $64,000 and an expense allowance of $21,300 annually, although Members representing Schedule III electoral districts receive an annual expense allowance of $26,200 and those representing the Northwest Territories receive an expense allowance of $28,200.
Also, Members may hire staff with their office budgets, whose rates of pay are determined by the Member upon appointment, but may not exceed an annual rate of $60,460, and pay increases may be made up to three times each year, not including raises resulting from promotions.
www.david-kilgour.com /mp/house.htm   (2588 words)

  
 Member of Parliament   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
A Member of Parliament''', or '''MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house.
In New Zealand ''Member of Parliament'' is the term for a member of the New Zealand House of Representatives, although parliament technically consists of both the House and the Queen of New ZealandQueen.
The members of the House of Lords are officially appointed by the British monarchyKing or Queen, but the selection is done by the British Prime Minister of the United KingdomPrime Minister/.
www.infothis.com /find/Member_of_Parliament   (760 words)

  
 SingaporeMoms - Parenting Encyclopedia - Jim Abbott (politician)
Jim Abbott (born August 18, 1942 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Conservative member of Canada's House of Commons.
Abbott was a member of the Reform Party from 1993 to 2000 and a member of the Canadian Alliance from 2000 to 2004.
He has been in the House of Commons since 1993, and has represented the riding of Kootenay—Columbia since 1997 and Kootenay East from 1993 to 1997.
www.singaporemoms.com /parenting/Jim_Abbott_(politician)   (114 words)

  
 Canadian federal election, 2004   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
A Canadian federal election (more formally, the 38th general election) was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons.
In the final months of 2003, the Progressive Conservatives and the Canadian Alliance were running a distant third and fourth, respectively, in public opinion polls.
This fear prompted those two parties to form a united Conservative Party of Canada, which was approved by the members of the Canadian Alliance on December 5, 2003 and controversially by the delegates of the Progressive Conservatives on December 6, 2003.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/C/Canadian-federal-election,-2004.htm   (2444 words)

  
 Category:Historical Members of the Canadian House of Commons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Please note that due to size, this category is currently being replaced by more specific categories grouping Members of Parliament by their province and party affiliation.
Each MP currently in this category should be refiled in the appropriate subcategory of Category:Members of the Canadian House of Commons by province and the appropriate subcategory (or subcategories) of Category:Members of the Canadian House of Commons by political party.
Categories: Members of the Canadian House of Commons
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Category:Historical_Members_of_the_Canadian_House_of_Commons   (172 words)

  
 CANADA (House of Commons - Chambre des Communes)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Elections were held for all members of the House of Commons following the premature dissolution of this body on 27 April 1997.
In the wake of the premature dissolution of the House of Commons, Prime Minister Jean Chr├ętien (Liberal Party) announced the date on the general elections on 27 April.
The voting outcome in general underlined the pronounced regionalisation of Canadian politics, with each party, besides the Liberals, being backed mainly on geographical basis (Reform Party in west, BQ in Quebec, Progressive Conservative Party (PCP) in the east) except for the socialist New Democratic Party (NDP), headed by Ms.
www.appf.org.pe /members/003about.htm   (1174 words)

  
 Articles - Members of the Canadian House of Commons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Announced on May 17, 2005, that she is leaving the Conservative caucus to sit as a Liberal MP and a member of the cabinet.
Announced on October 17, 2005 that she is leaving the NDP caucus to sit as an Independent after losing the nomination in her riding.
Previous members of the House of Commons in the 38th Parliament of Canada.
www.gaple.com /articles/Members_of_the_Canadian_House_of_Commons   (264 words)

  
 Canadian federal election, 1974   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Canadian federal election of 1974 was held on July 8 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons.
The New Democratic Party, led by David Lewis, lost less than two-and-a-half percentage points in popular vote, but almost half of their seats in the House of Commons.
The Social Credit Party of Canada, led by Real Caouette, continued to lose ground, and fell to 11 seats, one short of the number required to be recognized as a party in the House of Commons (and therefore qualify for research funds and parliamentary committee memberships).
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/C/Canadian-federal-election,-1974.htm   (469 words)

  
 A Supreme Court for Canada: Act One (1869)
The government will very much be guided by the feeling of the House, as to whether or not we will do more than submit it to the House this session.
Then again, in Ontario, where the system of courts involved a separation of equity and common law, it is of great importance if not of absolute necessity, that the Bars of equity and common law should both be represented upon the Bench of the Supreme Court.
Sir Georges E. Cartier informed the House that the government would not press for the approval of the Supreme Court Bill and the legislation was discharged from the Order Paper the next day.
www.duhaime.org /Canadian_history/cahi1869.aspx   (1197 words)

  
 Sample Debate in the Canadian House of Commons, by Bob Edwards
Bob Edwards was the editor of the infamous Calgary Eye Opener, the turn-of-the-century satirical newspaper with the largest circulation between Vancouver and Toronto.
It seems a pity that honorable members do not obtain more exact information on which to base their charges against the government.
In concluding the debate, the premier asked the government members to vote down this frivolous resolution, as it involved an attack upon the government.
www.brindleandglass.com /magazine/edwards_sample.htm   (793 words)

  
 Hate Crimes Law C-250 Passes 143-110 in Canadian House of Commons
The bill has been the subject of intense lobbying by pro-family and church groups who fear that the bill will lead to serious erosion of freedom of religion and expression in Canada.
C-250 was introduced as a private members bill by openly gay New Democratic Party MP Svend Robinson who has been a militant abortion, euthanasia and homosexuality activist.
C-250 must still be passed through the Senate where opponents might possibly have another opportunity to stop the draconian change in legislation.
www.lifesite.net /ldn/2003/sep/03091701.html   (312 words)

  
 Senators and Members - House of Commons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Family Relations in the Canadian Houses of Parliament
Members of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada
Members of the Cabinet, Parliamentary Secretaries, and Opposition Party Spokespersons
www.parl.gc.ca /common/SenatorsMembers_house.asp?Language=E&Parl=37&Ses=2&Sect=hoccur   (124 words)

  
 Falun Dafa Clearwisdom.net
Canadian House of Commons' Unanimous Motion Frees 3 Prisoners of Conscience
OTTAWA- A Private Member's Motion that was passed unanimously in the House on October 24
By adopting this motion last October, the House of Commons gave the impetus that resulted in the freeing of three prisoners of conscience, the improvement in the conditions of several others, and the rescuing of one Falun Gong practitioner who was about to be deported to China where she faced renewed imprisonment.
www.clearwisdom.net /emh/articles/2003/3/6/32960.html   (351 words)

  
 SingaporeMoms - Parenting Encyclopedia - Arthur Laing
He was a Liberal Member of the Canadian House of Commons from Vancouver, British Columbia.
In 1953, he became leader of the British Columbia Liberal Party just before a provincial election.
The bridge between Vancouver and the Vancouver Airport is named for him.
www.singaporemoms.com /parenting/Arthur_Laing   (102 words)

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