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Topic: Mercalli Intensity Scale


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Puerto Rico Seismic Network
The earthquake of greatest magnitude (4.7 in the Richter Scale) happened on the 13 of November at 16:27:49, and was felt in the Virgin Islands and in all Puerto Rico.
The earthquake of greatest intensity (V in Modified the Mercalli Scale, the central area and east of the island) happened on the 20 of June at 11:24:24, and was felt almost all over the island of Puerto Rico.
It was felt in the Dominican Republic and throughout Puerto Rico, with a maximum intensity of IV on the Modified Mercalli Scale (MM) for the western area of the island.
redsismica.uprm.edu /english/seismicity/sisloc.php   (1613 words)

  
 Earthquake Intensity
Intensity ratings are expressed as Roman numerals between I at the low end and XII at the high end.
The Intensity Scale differs from the Richter Magnitude Scale in that the effects of any one earthquake vary greatly from place to place, so there may be many Intensity values (e.g.: IV, VII) measured from one earthquake.
Intensities typically increase close to an earthquake's epicenter, allowing seismologists to interpret maps such as this for the general location of historical earthquakes.
www.seismo.unr.edu /ftp/pub/louie/class/100/mercalli.html   (468 words)

  
 Dacula, Georgia Earthquake Intensity Exercise
The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale is used to rank earthquakes according to how they are experienced by people in the area where the earthquake is felt.
On this scale, I is the mildest and XII is the most severe.
Using the the Modified Mercalli Scale and the descriptive data in the table below, rank the intensity of the earthquakes as they were felt at each data reporting station.
www.gpc.edu /~pgore/daculaquakedata.html   (1153 words)

  
 Meteomalaga
Intensity is a measure of the shaking and damage caused by the earthquake, and this value changes from location to location.
Because of the logarithmic basis of the scale, each whole number increase in magnitude represents a tenfold increase in measured amplitude; as an estimate of energy, each whole number step in the magnitude scale corresponds to the release of about 31 times more energy than the amount associated with the preceding whole number value.
Although numerous intensity scales have been developed over the last several hundred years to evaluate the effects of earthquakes, the one currently used in the United States is the Modified Mercalli (MM) Intensity Scale.
www.malagaweather.com /earthquake.html   (980 words)

  
 The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale
This scale, composed of 12 increasing levels of intensity that range from imperceptible shaking to catastrophic destruction, is designated by Roman numerals.
The Modified Mercalli Intensity value assigned to a specific site after an earthquake has a more meaningful measure of severity to the nonscientist than the magnitude because intensity refers to the effects actually experienced at that place.
The lower numbers of the intensity scale generally deal with the manner in which the earthquake is felt by people.
earthquake.usgs.gov /learning/topics/mercalli.php   (586 words)

  
 Kentucky: Division of Emergency Management - Record Book   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
While the last significant earthquake, a 5.1 on the Richter scale near Sharpsburg in Bath County in 1980, caused an estimated $3 million in damage the most notable earthquakes in Kentucky occurred along the NMSZ from December 1811 to March 1812.
Sharpsburg, in the central part of the state, was struck by an earthquake that measured 5.1 on the Richter scale on July 27, 1980.
Barbourville, on the morning of September 17, 2004 and was recorded at 3.7 on the Richter scale.
kyem.ky.gov /programs/earthquake   (1317 words)

  
 The Mercalli Scale   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
The Mercalli Intensity Scale assigns an intensity or rating to measure the effects of an earthquake at a particular location.
Earthquake intensities are rated with Roman numerals ranging from I (not felt) to XII (buildings nearly destroyed).
This Mercalli scale is from the Loma Prieta earthquake in the Santa Cruz mountains in California.
www.thetech.org /exhibits_events/online/quakes/grams/mercalli.html   (141 words)

  
 The Modified Mercalli (MM) Intensity Scale
Note: The Modified Mercalli scale is designed to describe the effects of an earthquake, at a given place, on natural features, on industrial installations and on human beings.
The intensity differs from the magnitude which is related to the energy released by an earthquake.
There are multiple versions of the MM scale, the one listed here being the 1931 version.
earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca /gen_info/scales/mercalli_e.php   (940 words)

  
  Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
The MMI scale grades the impact of an earthquake on people living on the earth's surface, and so can be more useful as an indicator of the earthquake's significance to the community.
The following table is taken from Dowrick, D J (1996) "The modified Mercalli earthquake intensity scale; revisions arising from recent studies of New Zealand earthquakes." Bulletin of the New Zealand National Society for Earthquake Engineering, 29 (2): 92-106.
By inference lesser damage to low-rise buildings on soft ground and higfh-rise buildings on firm or stiff ground may indicate the same intensity.
www.geonet.org.nz /mmi.html   (1002 words)

  
 [No title]
The Richter scale is a logarithmic measurement of the maximum wave amplitude recorded at a seismograph station, corrected for distance from the epicenter.
Intensity is a measure of the effect that the vibration had on natural and human-made structures.
Intensity is a function of many variables, including magnitude, depth of the earthquake, distance from the earthquake, local geological conditions, and local construction practices.
www.fema.gov /plan/prevent/earthquake/txt/fema-253-unit3b.txt   (1591 words)

  
 Introduction to the Earthquake Intensity Database
Earthquake intensities are numerical values assigned to the effects of earthquakes on people and their works, and on the natural environment.
Intensities are evaluated using the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale of 1931, which contains levels of effects ranging from intensity I, barely perceptible, to intensity XII, total damage.
But this scale also had severe limitations, and therefore was superseded in the early 1900s by Mercalli's revised intensity scale; it contained 12 levels of intensity.
www.ngdc.noaa.gov /seg/hazard/intintro.shtml   (2874 words)

  
 The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
The intensity scale consists of a series of certain key responses such as people awakening, movement of furniture, damage to chimneys, and finally - total destruction.
This scale, composed of 12 increasing levels of intensity that range from imperceptible shaking to catastrophic destruction, is designated by Roman numerals.
The Modified Mercalli Intensity value assigned to a specific site after an earthquake has a more meaningful measure of severity to the nonscientist than the magnitude because intensity refers to the effects actually experienced at that place.
jclahr.com /alaska/aeic/magnitude/mm.html   (456 words)

  
 Modified mercalli intensity scale: earthquakes: office of emergency management: departments: City of Fort Collins
The earlier method is known as the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale.
This scale was invented by Giuseppe Mercalli in 1902.
It has a graduated scale from 1 to 12 and is based on peoples' visual and physical observations at the time of the event.
www.ci.fort-collins.co.us /oem/modified-mercalli.php   (523 words)

  
 Field Trip to Mars - Kids - Earthquake Intensity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
The scale takes into account the distance between various seismographs, the density of the ground and other factors to give a number for reference.
Each increase in whole number on the scale is ten times the measured amplitude (strength) of the previous and corresponds to about 31 times more energy released by the quake.
Earthquake intensity has been measured by various scales over the years but the one currently in use in the US is the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale.
www.kidscosmos.org /kid-stuff/kids-earthquakes-intensity.html   (425 words)

  
 How Are Earthquake Magnitudes Measured?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
Using this scale, a magnitude 5 earthquake would result in ten times the level of ground shaking as a magnitude 4 earthquake (and 32 times as much energy would be released).
Invented by Giuseppe Mercalli in 1902, this scale uses the observations of the people who experienced the earthquake to estimate its intensity.
The Mercalli scale isn't considered as scientific as the Richter scale, though.
www.geo.mtu.edu /UPSeis/intensity.html   (471 words)

  
 The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale was developed in 1931 by American seismologists Harry Wood and Frank Neumann.
The scale, composed of 12 levels of intensity that range from imperceptible shaking to catastrophic destruction, is designated by Roman numerals.
The scale is not mathematically based, but rather a ranking based on observed effects.
info.insure.com /home/disaster/mercalli.html   (311 words)

  
 UALR Arkansas Earthquake Center - The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale - Modified Mercalli Scale, MM scale, measuring ...
Although numerous intensity scales have been developed over the last several hundred years to evaluate the effects of earthquakes, the one currently used in the United States is the Modified Mercalli (MM) Intensity Scale.
The lower numbers of the intensity scale generally deal with the manner in which the earthquake is felt by people.
The higher numbers of the scale are based on observed structural damage.
quake.ualr.edu /public/mercalli.htm   (491 words)

  
 BSL FAQ: Intensity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
Intensity and magnitude are concepts which are frequently confused.
These links primarily explain the use of the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale to describe the "effects" of earthquakes.
Other intensity scales have been used in the past and in other countries.
seismo.berkeley.edu /faq/intensity_0.html   (107 words)

  
 Florida Oceanographic Online-Earthquake Magnitude & Intensity Scale
The Richter magnitude scale was developed in 1935 by Charles F. Richter of the California Institute of Technology as a mathematical device to compare the size of earthquakes.
Because of the logarithmic basis of the scale, each whole number increase in magnitude represents a tenfold increase in measured amplitude; as an estimate of energy, each whole number step in the magnitude scale corresponds to the release of about 31 times more energy than the amount associated with the preceding whole number value.
The Richter Scale is not used to express damage.
www.floridaoceanographic.org /reference/earthquake.htm   (1263 words)

  
 KIE Evidence: The Mercalli Scale - Intensity and Earthquake Effects   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
The Mercalli scale is a less scientific measure than the Richter Scale.
Mercalli tells us an earthquake's intensity, the type of damage we can typically expect, or the effects of that earthquake at different locations.
This web page depicts one earthquake in California and corresonding intensity effects on different locations, showing students that for each earthquake there are multiple intensity values.
kie.berkeley.edu /ned/data/E01-980211-002/full.html   (260 words)

  
 MODIFIED MERCALLI (MM) INTENSITY SCALE
Note: The Modified Mercalli scale is designed to describe the effects of an earthquake, at a given place, on natural features, on industrial installations and on human beings.
The intensity differs from the magnitude which is related to the energy released by an earthquake.
There are multiple versions of the MM scale, the one listed here being the 1931 version.
www.okgeosurvey1.gov /mercalli_e.html   (908 words)

  
 PropertyRisk Glossary - Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale
The MMI scale was recently "modernized" by including the effects of shaking on architectural and engineering works common in today's urban communities.
After the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the descriptions of the damaging levels of the MMI scale were "modernized" in a version of the scale published by Dewey, J.W., et al.
The many phenomena originally associated with intensities X and above are apparently related less to the level of ground shaking than to the presence of ground conditions susceptible to spectacular failure, or to the ease with which seismic faulting of different style and depth can propagate to the ground surface.
www.propertyrisk.com /mmi.htm   (849 words)

  
 New Jersey Office of Emergency Management - County Emergency Management - Coordinator's Association - Community ...
The size or strength of an earthquake may be measured by the intensity or kind of damage that occurs.
Intensity depends on your distance from the epicenter and the geologic area.
The Modified Mercalli scale measures the earthquake’s effect on people, property and ground damage.
www.state.nj.us /njoem/opb_earmeasure.html   (247 words)

  
 SEISMIC INTENSITY SCALES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-23)
A scale of seismic intensity is a way of measuring or rating the effects of an earthquake at different sites.
The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale is commonly used in the United States to seek information on the severity of effects of an earthquake.
The Mercalli scale is a semi-quantitative linear scale.
www.il-st-acad-sci.org /kingdom/geo1001.html   (403 words)

  
 CSU, Long Beach -- Geography 458/558 -- Hazards and Risk Assessment
Magnitude measures (including the Richter scale) express the energy released in an earthquake; intensity measures (the Modified Mercalli Intensity scale) express an earthquake's severity in terms of more subjective overall impacts on human beings, their assets, and the physical environment.
Then, you'll examine the pattern of earthquake intensity reports by location and pencil in isoseisms enclosing all areas reporting a 7, a 6, a 5, a 4, a 3, and not felt (a o).
Also, your experience of an earthquake depends (at lower intensities) on whether you are moving around or lying/sitting still or whether you're on the upper floors of a building or on the ground floor.
www.csulb.edu /~rodrigue/geog458558/isoseismlab.html   (849 words)

  
 Jay's Java Earthquake
Before there were seismometers which could measure the vibration of the earth caused by earthquakes, scientists used descriptive measures of the effects of the vibration as a means of quantifying their size or severity.
One of the first intensity scales was developed by the Italian scientist De Rossi and the Swiss scientist Forel, known as the Rossi-Forrel scale.
In 1902 the Italian scientist Mercalli improved this scale, and in 1931 the American scientists H.O. Wood and F. Neumann adapted the scale for use in California.
www.pulli.com /equake.html   (216 words)

  
 Seismo-Watch
In the early days of earthquake investigations, seismologist used earthquake intensities as the applicable yardstick to estimate the size of an earthquake.
Intensities are measured by means of the degree of damage to structures, the amount of disturbance to the ground surface, and the extent of human and animal reactions to the shaking.
A scale developed by the Italian seismologist and volcanologist G. Mercalli in 1902 has 12 values for describing an earthquake.
www.seismo-watch.com /EQSERVICES/Preparedness/MMI.html   (359 words)

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