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Topic: Mesopotamia


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  Internet Ancient History Sourcebook: Mesopotamia
The Origin and Development of Writing in Mesopotamia: An Economic Interpretation [At Internet Archive][Modern Illustrated Account]
Interactive Map: Political Change in Ancient Mesopotamia, 3000-1000 BCE [At U. Oregon]
The Indus valley culture which had some interaction with Mesopotamia.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/ancient/asbook03.html   (1275 words)

  
  Ancient Mesopotamia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mesopotamia means "the land between the rivers" or "the land between the two rivers." This was the site of the world's first civilization, Sumer.
Mesopotamia is often referred to as the "cradle of civilization" because the world's first civilization occurred there.
In ancient times, the Greeks later called the area of the world's first civilization "Mesopotamia" which means "the land between the rivers" or "the land between two rivers." This name was appropriate because ancient Mesopotamia was located between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in the present-day Middle Eastern country of Iraq.
itss229.ed.psu.edu /k-12/edpgs/su96/meso/mesopotamia.html   (2886 words)

  
  Mesopotamia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mesopotamia was coined in the Hellenistic period without any definite boundaries, to refer to a broad geographical area and probably used by the Seleucids.
"Ancient Mesopotamia" is taken to include the period from the late 4th millennium BC until the rise of the Achaemenids in the 6th century BC.
Mesopotamia was one of the first, if not the first, place in the world where writing developed.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mesopotamia   (4429 words)

  
 Ancient Mesopotamia
The land of Mesopotamia was once dominated by floods, but today is mostly desert.
The seasonal flooding was a challenge to the farmers of Mesopotamia.
In Mesopotamia the people looked to religion to answer their questions about life and death, good and evil, and the forces of nature.
www.shrewsbury-ma.gov /schools/Central/Curriculum/ELEMENTARY/SOCIALSTUDIES/Mesopotamia/ancient_mesopotamia.htm   (1852 words)

  
 Mesopotamia
A wider definition of Mesopotamia is the land that that lies between the Zagros and Anti-Taurus mountains in the northern end, and the Arabian plateau and Persian Gulf to the south, corresponding to modern Iraq, eastern Syria and southeastern Turkey.
Mesopotamia also had other important raw materials available, even if stone and wood was rare, which had to be imported.
635: Mesopotamia is conquered by the Muslim Arabs.
www.i-cias.com /e.o/mesopotamia.htm   (979 words)

  
 Mesopotamia, A History of. A Place For Civilization To Begin   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In the narrow sense, Mesopotamia is the area between the Euphrates and Tigris rivers, north or northwest of the bottleneck at Baghdad, in modern Iraq; it is Al-Jazirah ("The Island") of the Arabs.
However, in the broader sense, the name Mesopotamia has come to be used for the area bounded on the northeast by the Zagros Mountains and on the southwest by the edge of the Arabian Plateau and stretching from the Persian Gulf in the southeast to the spurs of the Anti-Taurus Mountains in the northwest.
The supply of water is not regular; as a result of the high average temperatures and a very low annual rainfall, the ground of the plain of latitude 35 N is hard and dry and unsuitable for plant cultivation for at least eight months in the year.
www.ragz-international.com /mesopotamia_a_place_to_start.htm   (1321 words)

  
 Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia could also be an extremely threatening environment, however, driving its peoples to seek security from the vicissitudes of nature.
Mesopotamia was immeasurably enriched by this, the mildest of all foreign occupations of the region.
The population of Mesopotamia was enormously enlarged, chiefly by Arabs, Iranians, and Aramaeans.
www.shsu.edu /~his_ncp/Iraq.html   (3455 words)

  
 mesopotamia
La Mesopotamia antica, come l'Egitto, deve la propria fortuna economica ai fiumi che la percorrono, i quali durante le piene, ricoprivano il terreno di un limo molto fertile che rendeva prospera l’agricoltura.
Dalla Mesopotamia, anche grazie ai traffici dei Fenici, la sua cultura si diffuse per tutto il Mediterraneo entrando in contatto specialmente col popolo greco che derivò da essa molti elementi della sua civiltà e della sua arte.
I popoli della Mesopotamia avevano a disposizione cibi molto variati.
www.scuolascacchi.com /storia_antica/nmesopotamia.htm   (3586 words)

  
 Mesopotamia Ancient History Early Civilizations
Mesopotamia - "The Cradle of Civilization." It is indeed a cradle, starting the first civilizations on Earth: Sumer, Babylonia, Hatti (Hittites), Phoenicia, Assyria, Chaldea, Persia, and Hebrews.
Mesopotamia is located between the Tigris River and the Euphrates River, in present day Iraq.
(The Fertile Crescent is located between the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf, including Mesopotamia.) As a result, the region became a crossroad where people and ideas met.
www.einfoweb.com /mesopotamia   (150 words)

  
 MEDICINE IN ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIA
The name Mesopotamia (meaning "the land between the rivers") refers to the geographic region which lies near the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers and not to any particular civilization.
The land of Mesopotamia is made fertile by the irregular and often violent flooding of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers.
The first type of practitioner was the ashipu, in older accounts of Mesopotamian medicine often called a "sorcerer." One of the most important roles of the ashipu was to diagnose the ailment.
www.indiana.edu /~ancmed/meso.HTM   (2257 words)

  
 mesopotamia.html
Mesopotamia was a name given to the region by the Romans and Greeks; it means "land between the waters." Mesopotamia was divided into two regions, Sumer in the south, and Assyria in the north, and these areas would give their names to its two significant early civilizations.
They are the fullest law code we have from Mesopotamia, and show a society rigidly divided by class, in which different types of punishments were meted out to different social orders, and capital offenses were common.
Unlike in Mesopotamia, the kings had no need of law codes, since they were the source of all law and authority, and their authority was ultimately religious.
www.loyno.edu /~seduffy/mesopotamia.html   (1495 words)

  
 'An Introduction to Ancient Mesopotamia' paper by Ian Lawton
Lying within the western regions of modern-day Iraq, Mesopotamia - literally 'The Land between the Rivers' - is the name given since ancient times to the great alluvial plain built up by the silt deposits of the Euphrates in the west and the Tigris in the east.
It extends from north of Baghdad down to the mouth of the Persian Gulf, and is bordered in the north and east by the vast mountain ranges stretching down from Kurdistan to the Zagros in Iran, in the west by the Syrian desert.
We have already seen that the considerable written heritage of Mesopotamia contains not only literary texts (on which we will concentrate in subsequent papers but which are of lesser importance here), but also administrative and historiographic texts which have provided scholars with an invaluable source of information with which to construct a chronological framework.
www.ianlawton.com /mes1.htm   (5698 words)

  
 Ancient Mesopotamia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mesopotamia means "the land between the rivers" or "the land between the two rivers." This was the site of the world's first civilization, Sumer.
Mesopotamia is often referred to as the "cradle of civilization" because the world's first civilization occurred there.
In ancient times, the Greeks later called the area of the world's first civilization "Mesopotamia" which means "the land between the rivers" or "the land between two rivers." This name was appropriate because ancient Mesopotamia was located between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in the present-day Middle Eastern country of Iraq.
www.ed.psu.edu /k-12/edpgs/su96/meso/mesopotamia.html   (2886 words)

  
 Astronomy in Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia, the ancient land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in southwest Asia, was far more advanced than many other emerging civilizations of its time.
Mesopotamia also made explorations in science and mathematics.
While much ancient knowledge of astronomy is attributed to the works of Greek astronomers conducted centuries later, the people of Mesopotamia had begun to delve into the oldest of sciences as far back as 4000 B.C. These early scholars recorded their findings on thousands of clay tablets belonging to both the Babylonian and Assyrian cultures.
www.stormpages.com /swadhwa/hofa/mesopotamia.html   (1079 words)

  
 Mesopotamia, 8000-2000 B.C. | Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The West Asian portion of the Timeline therefore employs the common practice of using, without prejudice, the so-called Middle Chronology, where events are dated relative to the reign of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which is defined as being ca.
As the culture spreads, local pottery styles are replaced throughout Mesopotamia extending into the eastern Mediterranean, Iran, and the Arabian Peninsula.
When southern Mesopotamia is reunited under the kings of Ur, Sumerian is reintroduced as the administrative and literary language.
www.metmuseum.org /toah/ht/02/wam/ht02wam.htm   (1039 words)

  
 Mesopotamia, 1000 B.C.-1 A.D. | Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Babylonians dominate Mesopotamia until 539 B.C., when Cyrus the Great of Persia, who has already overthrown the Medes, incorporates it into his rapidly growing empire.
The empire is governed from two capitals, Antioch in Syria and Seleucia in southern Mesopotamia.
from Iran seize Mesopotamia from Seleucid control and establish their capital on the Tigris at Ctesiphon, across the river from Seleucia.
www.metmuseum.org /toah/ht/04/wam/ht04wam.htm   (757 words)

  
 Collapse: Mesopotamia
Many resources in Mesopotamia were scarce or absent, which stimulated trade in the region in ancient times.
The rivers were higher than the surrounding plain because of built-up silt in the river beds, so water for irrigation flowed into the fields by gravity.
By about 2300 B.C., agricultural production in Mesopotamia was reduced to a tiny fraction of what it had been.
www.learner.org /exhibits/collapse/mesopotamia.html   (512 words)

  
 Brief History of Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia, the land between the rivers, derives its name and existence from the rivers Tigris and Euphrates.
The space we call Mesopotamia is roughly the same as that of the modern country of Iraq.
The next empire to arise in Mesopotamia came from a different quarter, the Assyrians in the northeast.
it.stlawu.edu /~dmelvill/mesomath/history.html   (1236 words)

  
 Root Entry
Approaches focused on social unrest in southern Mesopotamia precipitating large scale emigration as discussed previously by Johnson and this author are considered, as is the possible importance of specialized pastoral production.
In particular, I suggest that we need to recognize that there was tremendous internal variation in power relations between the urbanized Uruk states and their hinterlands, so that Mesopotamian political and economic influence declined with distance from the southern alluvium.
The alluvial plains of southern Mesopotamia are generally considered to have been the heartland of Uruk-period social, political, and economic developments.
www.science.widener.edu /ssci/mesopotamia   (6769 words)

  
 History of Sex: Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia is known to have the oldest records of human history,
Ishtar was the primary deity of ancient Mesopotamia.
Mesopotamia originated as a matriarchy and its goddess, Ishtar, ruled over everything including war and weapons.
www.bigeye.com /sexeducation/mesopotamia.html   (711 words)

  
 Mesopotamia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
To classical peoples, the Babylonians were considered a witty, urbane, mysterious, occult, and very decadent folk; a realistic appraisal in some ways since, by their own standards, the Babylonians had seen everything that could happen to a nation and a people, and could no longer be much surprised.
To the Parthian Empire (Persia)............141 BCE-226 CE The Parthians seized control of central and northern Mesopotamia from the Seleucid Empire in the mid 2nd century.
The Kurds are an Indo-European people who have lived in northern Mesopotamia for ages; their language is most closely related to Iranian, although the people do not strongly resemble Iranians.
www.hostkingdom.net /ancmesop.html   (1973 words)

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