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Topic: Methodism


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In the News (Thu 21 Mar 19)

  
  CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Methodism
Methodism for the rigorous doctrine of predestination as understood by Calvinism.
Methodism, Newfoundland and the eastern provinces of Canada were after 1799 supplied with preachers from England, and came under English jurisdiction.
Methodism spread to Tasmania in 1820, to Tonga in 1822, to
www.newadvent.org /cathen/10237b.htm   (4228 words)

  
  Methodism
In its work of conversion Methodism is aggressive and largely appeals to religious sentiment; camp-meetings and revivals are important forms of evangelization, at least in America.
Methodism was introduced into France in 1790, but it has never succeeded in getting a strong foothold there.
Methodism spread to Tasmania in 1820, to Tonga in 1822, to New Zealand in 1823, and in 1835 Cargill and Cross began their evangelistic work in the Fiji Islands.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/m/methodism.html   (5449 words)

  
 Methodism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is not unusual in Methodism for each congregation to normally hold an annual Covenant Service on the first convenient Sunday of the year, and Wesley's Covenant Prayer is still used, with minor modification, in the order of service.
Traditionally, Methodism proved particularly popular in Wales and Cornwall, both regions noted for their non-conformism and distrust of the Church of England.
Some important events of this revival were the writings of Phoebe Palmer during the mid-1800s, the establishment of the first of many holiness camp meetings at Vineland, New Jersey in 1867, and the founding of Asbury College, (1890), and other similar institutions in the US around the turn of the 20th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Methodism   (3380 words)

  
 Methodism in the Isle of Man
Rise of Manx Methodism 1775-1851 - an overview.
Story of Methodism in the Isle of Man - an 'interim' report started by Mrs E Chapman + additional notes
Extracts from Grindrod 'Compendium of the Laws and Regulations of Wesleyan Methodism.' 1842
www.isle-of-man.com /manxnotebook/methdism/index.htm   (187 words)

  
 JRULM: British Methodism and the Poor   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-06)
A distinctive aspect of early Methodism was its outreach to the poor.
While Wesley encouraged and even demanded this level of commitment, Methodism was very much dependent on local effort and initiative to put his ideals into practice.
Methodism and the Poor in the twentieth century
rylibweb.man.ac.uk /data1/dg/methodist/poor   (898 words)

  
 Methodism - MSN Encarta
Methodism was brought to the U.S. before the American Revolution by emigrants from both Ireland and England.
Methodism, spread by the circuit rider and the revival meeting, advanced westward with the frontier.
In 1946 two small denominations of German ethnic origin that were unaffiliated with Methodism but greatly influenced by it, the Evangelical Church and the Church of the United Brethren in Christ, united to form the Evangelical United Brethren Church.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761573984_2/Methodism.html   (986 words)

  
 Methodism - MSN Encarta
Methodism, worldwide Protestant movement dating from 1729, when a group of students at the University of Oxford, England, began to assemble for worship, study, and Christian service.
Their fellow students named them the Holy Club and “methodists,” a derisive allusion to the methodical manner in which they performed the various practices that their sense of Christian duty and church ritual required.
Among the Oxford group were John Wesley, considered the founder of Methodism, and his brother Charles, the sons of an Anglican rector.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761573984/Methodism.html   (648 words)

  
 METHODISM - LoveToKnow Article on METHODISM
Methodism has always been aggressive, and her children on emigrating have taken with therx their evangelistic methods.
Methodism is also represented in several European countries by Conferences and Missions affiliated to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America, and their membership is included in the figures given local and travelling preachers, and the organization of local societies with class leaders, stewards and trustees.
Methodism a facsimile of that in England, subject to Wesley and the British Conferencea society and not a Church.
60.1911encyclopedia.org /M/ME/METHODISM.htm   (4138 words)

  
 Traditional Catholic Apologetics.net | Methodism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-06)
In its work of conversion Methodism is aggressive and largely appeals to religious sentiment; camp-meetings and revivals are important forms of evangelization, at least in America.
Methodism was introduced into France in 1790, but it has never succeeded in getting a strong foothold there.
Methodism spread to Tasmania in 1820, to Tonga in 1822, to New Zealand in 1823, and in 1835 Cargill and Cross began their evangelistic work in the Fiji Islands.
www.catholicapologetics.net /methodism.htm   (5343 words)

  
 Methodism - Encyclopedia.com
Methodism the doctrines, polity, and worship of those Protestant Christian denominations that have developed from the movement started in England by the teaching of John Wesley.
The beginning of Methodism as a popular movement dates from 1738, when both of the Wesley brothers, influenced by contact with the Moravians, undertook evangelistic preaching.
Antiguan Methodism and Antislavery Activity: Anne and Elizabeth Hart in the Eighteenth-Century Black Atlantic.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Methodis.html   (1303 words)

  
 Search Results for "Methodism"
Methodism, the doctrines, polity, and worship of those Protestant Christian denominations that have developed from the movement started in England by the teaching...
He is known as the apostle of Methodism in New England where, from 1789 to 1798, his labors as an itinerant...
Principles of Wesleyan Methodism (1850); Modern Anglican Theology (1857); Relations of J. Wesley to the Church of England (1868); National...
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?FILTER=&query=Methodism   (264 words)

  
 Methodism
Methodism is the name given to a group of Protestant churches that arose from the 18th century Wesleyan movement in England led by John and Charles Wesley and George Whitefield.
Wesleyan Methodism was later established in America by unofficial lay missionaries such as Philip Embury, Barbara Heck, Robert Strawbridge, and Thomas Webb; and by missionaries appointed by John Wesley, of whom the chief were Francis Asbury, Richard Boardman, Joseph Pilmore, and Thomas Rankin.
Concurrent with this development North American Methodism is undergoing the emergence of a neo Wesleyan theology associated with J Robert Nelson, Albert Outler, Robert Cushman, and Carl Michalson.
mb-soft.com /believe/text/methodis.htm   (2294 words)

  
 Methodism: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-06)
The new birth is how john wesley and methodism have traditionally referred to the "born again experience"....
The free methodist church is a denomination of methodism, which is a branch of protestantism....
The church of the nazarene is a denomination of protestant christianity, within the broad tradition of methodism....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/m/me/methodism.htm   (5887 words)

  
 William Williams & Welsh Calvinistic Methodism
The real beginning of Methodism is found in the mighty experience through which Whitefield passed in 1736, and through which the Wesley brothers passed in May 1738.
And it seems to me that both these branches or divisions of Methodism showed exactly the same zeal and enthusiasm in this desire to bring their fellow men and women to a knowledge of God's salvation in Christ Jesus, and that they were equal also in the success which they attained.
Another danger which Calvinism without Methodism is prone to is that Confessions of Faith, instead of being subordinate standards, tend to be the primary and supreme standard, replacing the Bible in that position.
bsrich.tripod.com /calvinistic/welshcalmeth.html   (8590 words)

  
 Joseph C. Hartzell (Joseph Crane), 1842-1929. Methodism and the Negro in the United States. From The Journal of Negro ...
Methodism grew with the colonies, and at the close of the American Revolution had 84 preachers and 15,000 members in its societies.
Shut away from the large Negro populations of the South, and confronted with aggressive African Methodism among the smaller Negro population in the North calling for separation from the whites in ecclesiastical organization and government, the field of operation of the Methodist Episcopal Church was necessarily proscribed among Africa's sons and daughters.
She was, however, faithful to her trust and retained her Negro membership in church and conference relations, and, as the years went by, became more and more permeated with sentiments of antagonism to slavery, both as related to the church and the nation.
docsouth.unc.edu /church/hartzell/hartzell.html   (4677 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for methodism
Methodism Worldwide religious movement that began in England in the 18th century.
He is known as the apostle of Methodism in New England where, from 1789 to 1798, his labors as an itinerant preacher over a wide area met with signal success.
(1703–1791) Anglican clergyman, evangelist, and cofounder of Methodism.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=methodism   (773 words)

  
 The Rise of Methodism
The Rise of Methodism in the Vale of Aylesbury, 1772 - 1791.
Methodism as a religion started in England in the 1700s by John Wesley (1703 - 1791), his brother Charles and George Whitefield.
John Wesley himself lived and died a priest of the Church of England, but the movement, which attached great importance to personal conversion and the right of all believers to preach the gospel, gradually came to be organised as a separate denomination called Methodism, so named because of the follower's methodical devotion to religious study.
www.users.on.net /~jseamons/Methodism.htm   (1689 words)

  
 The History and Development of Bible Methodism
However, Bible Methodism evidences a good balance between the twin truths of external separation from the world and the absolute necessity for those standards to come from a heart motivated to please God, rather than from conformity to a standard for the sake of outward acceptability.
When Bible Methodism came out of Wesleyan Methodism, though for Trouten and those first Ohio secessionists the primary moti­vation was polity concerns, for the majority of the ministers and laity, the greater concern was worldliness.
Bible Methodism lost the personal accountability that was so characteristic of Wesleyanism, and consequently lost the dynamic which had constantly propelled Wesleyans on in their pursuit of holy living.
pages.prodigy.net /apbrown2/BibleMethodism/HistoryofBibleMethodism.htm   (4553 words)

  
 Methodism - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Methodism, worldwide Protestant movement dating from 1729, when a group of students at the University of Oxford began to assemble for worship,...
Primitive Methodism, Protestant Christian movement, an offshoot of Wesleyan Methodism that emerged in England in 1811 when evangelical enthusiasts...
The reaction against intellectual and formalistic tendencies in Protestantism that had produced Pietism continued in the 18th century, with the...
uk.encarta.msn.com /Methodism.html   (99 words)

  
 All the Divisions of Methodism
By 1923 Methodism was divided fifteen ways, not counting those which were absorbed or had died out, nor those which did not keep "Methodist" in their name.
Methodism was carried to Canada from New York in 1774.
By 1883 the four branches of English Methodism that came to Canada and this church were united as the Canadian Methodist Church.
www.kansasheritage.org /um/asbury~1.html   (2474 words)

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