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Topic: Methylphenidate


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  methylphenidate   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Methylphenidate was patented in 1950 by the CIBA-Geigy Pharmaceutical Company, a precursor to Novartis, and was initially prescribed as a treatment for depression, chronic fatigue, and narcolepsy, among other ailments.
MPH is a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, which means that it increases the level of the dopamine neurotransmitter in the brain by partially blocking the transporters that remove it from the synapses.
In the United States, methylphenidate is classified as a Schedule II narcotic, the designation used for substances that have a recognized medical value but which have a high potential for abuse.
encyclopedia.mysleepcenter.com /methylphenidate.htm   (624 words)

  
 Methylphenidate: Encyclopedia of Cancer
In addition, methylphenidate may improve the mood of a cancer patient suffering from feelings of depression, often raises a patient's energy level, and may improve his or her appetite.
Methylphenidate should not be given to patients with extreme anxiety, tension, agitation, severe depression, instability, or a history of alcohol or drug abuse.
Methylphenidate is not typically ordered for women during their childbearing years, unless the doctor determines that the benefits outweigh the risks.
health.enotes.com /cancer-encyclopedia/methylphenidate   (584 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Drug Information: Methylphenidate
Methylphenidate is used as part of a treatment program for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; more difficulty focusing, controlling actions, and remaining still or quiet than other people who are the same age).
Methylphenidate (Ritalin, Ritalin SR, Methylin, Methylin ER) is also used to treat narcolepsy (a sleep disorder that causes excessive daytime sleepiness and sudden attacks of sleep).
Methylphenidate should not be used to treat depression or excessive tiredness that is not caused by narcolepsy.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/druginfo/medmaster/a682188.html   (1414 words)

  
 concerta concerta zoloft tramadol interactions   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Methylphenidate ADHD concerta zoloft tramadol interactions (meth-il-FEN-i-date) belongs to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) stimulants.
Methylphenidate ADHD concerta zoloft tramadol interactions works in the treatment of ADHD by increasing attention and decreasing restlessness in children and adults who are overactive, cannot concentrate for very long or are easily distracted, and are impulsive.
Methylphenidate ADHD concerta zoloft tramadol interactions may cause dizziness, drowsiness, or changes in vision.
concerta.famousasses.com   (1898 words)

  
 concerta hydrocodone com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Methylphenidate works in the treatment of ADHD by increasing attention and decreasing restlessness in children and adults who are overactive, cannot concentrate for very long or are easily distracted, and are impulsive.
It is not known whether long-term use of methylphenidate causes slowed growth.
Methylphenidate may cause dizziness, drowsiness, or changes in vision.
concerta.guardsmanwoodpro.com   (1842 words)

  
 Phentermine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Central nervous system biogenic amine targets for control of appetite and energy.
Amphetamine, Benzylpiperazine, Cathinone, CFT, Chlorphentermine, Clobenzorex, Cocaine, Cyclopentamine, Diethylpropion, Ephedrine, Fenfluramine, Mazindol, 4-Methyl-aminorex, Methylone, Methylphenidate, Pemoline, Phendimetrazine, Phenmetrazine,
This page was last modified 18:34, 1 September 2006.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Phentermine   (648 words)

  
 Concerta Drug Description - Methylphenidate XR - HealthScout
Concerta Drug Description - Methylphenidate XR - HealthScout
CONCERTA ® contains the drug methylphenidate, a central nervous sys-tem stimulant that has been used to treat ADHD for more than 30 years.
CONCERTA ® is taken by mouth, once each day in the morning.
www.healthscout.com /rxdetail/1/21/1/main.html   (89 words)

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