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Topic: Metonymy


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  metonymy1
A short summary of his ideas on metonymy and metaphor is given by Colin Moock in the context of an analysis of the World Wide Web in terms of similarity disorder.
Metonymy and metaphor are terms from classical rhetoric which refer to figures of speech.
Metonymy (in its broadest sense) and metaphor are the principal linguistic mechanisms of humor.
www.ams.org /featurecolumn/archive/metonymy1.html   (451 words)

  
 HLW: Word Meanings: Metaphor and metonymy
Another conceptual relation that permits metonymy is that between a document and the content of the document.
Metonymy may also be used in situations where an alternative to an existing noun is called for, perhaps as a very informal or insulting term.
Metonymy may also come into play "on the fly", when a speaker is using language creatively.
www.iub.edu /~hlw/Meaning/metaphor.html   (1107 words)

  
  Metonymy and Conceptual Blending   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Fauconnier and Turner (2000) describe the interaction of metaphor, metonymy, and conceptual blending, noting how complex blends often allow non-counterparts to be combined in virtue of metonymic connections in their inputs.
We extend this analysis here by discussing the role of metonymy in a range of conceptual blends that span a continuum from instances of ordinary language use to examples of human creativity and artistry operating at its highest pitch.
Metonymic language can thus be construed as referring to compressed elements in blended spaces, while conventional metonymies help speakers to unpack mappings from the compressed element in a blended space to its various counterparts in the input spaces in the integration network.
hci.ucsd.edu /coulson/metonymy-rev.htm   (8786 words)

  
  metonymy - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
metonymy, figure of speech in which an attribute of a thing or something closely related to it is substituted for the thing itself.
Narrating the unnarratable: gender and metonymy in the Victorian novel.
Fredy Neptune: metonymy and the incarnate preposition.(Australian poem)
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-metonymy.html   (347 words)

  
 metonymy1
A short summary of his ideas on metonymy and metaphor is given by Colin Moock in the context of an analysis of the World Wide Web in terms of similarity disorder.
Metonymy and metaphor are terms from classical rhetoric which refer to figures of speech.
Metonymy (in its broadest sense) and metaphor are the principal linguistic mechanisms of humor.
e-math.ams.org /featurecolumn/archive/metonymy1.html   (451 words)

  
 metonymy1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
A short summary of his ideas on metonymy and metaphor is given by Colin Moock in the context of an analysis of the World Wide Web in terms of similarity disorder.
Metonymy and metaphor are terms from classical rhetoric which refer to figures of speech.
Metonymy (in its broadest sense) and metaphor are the principal linguistic mechanisms of humor.
www.math.sunysb.edu /~tony/whatsnew/column/metonymy-1199/metonymy1.html   (457 words)

  
 Metonymy at AllExperts
In rhetoric, metonymy (in Greek μετά (meta) = after/later and όνομα (onoma) = name) (pronounced //) is the substitution of one word for another with which it is associated.
In cognitive linguistics, metonymy refers to the use of a single characteristic to identify a more complex entity and is one of the basic characteristics of cognition.
However, when people use metonymy, they do not typically wish to transfer qualities as they do with metaphor: there is nothing crown-like about the king, or plate-like about an entrée.
en.allexperts.com /e/m/me/metonymy.htm   (963 words)

  
 HLW: Word Meanings: Metaphor and metonymy
Another conceptual relation that permits metonymy is that between a document and the content of the document.
Metonymy may also be used in situations where an alternative to an existing noun is called for, perhaps as a very informal or insulting term.
Metonymy may also come into play "on the fly", when a speaker is using language creatively.
www.indiana.edu /~hlw/Meaning/metaphor.html   (1107 words)

  
 METONYMY AS THE PRIMARY TROPE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Metonymy is not only the cognitive means by which we experience the world, but basically almost all other animals also employ the same means so far as they are able to experience things.
Metonymy is not only a matter of linguistic representation, but in general a manner of cognition that originates in pre-linguistic representation.
Metonymy is realized as a representative function of predication, i.e., a function to give a predicate for a subject or subjects, when it evolves from the pre-linguistic level to the linguistic level.
www33.ocn.ne.jp /~homosignificans/metonymy.htm   (6412 words)

  
 Words in English :: Meaning
Metonymy is the substitution of one word for another with which it is associated.
The common figure "The White House said..." is a good example of metonymy, with the term "White House" actually referring to the authorities who are symbolized by the White House, which is an inanimate object that says nothing.
Metonymy can also refer to the rhetorical strategy of describing something indirectly by referring to things around it: describing someone's house in order to describe them, for example.
www.ruf.rice.edu /~kemmer/Words04/meaning   (543 words)

  
 Poetry: literary devices
Metonymy is a figure of speech in which the name of something is used to refer to something that that name stands for.
Synecdoche is a form of metonymy, but it differs slightly in that it "specializes," usually in reference to a "number." When we say, "President Bush won only the states colored in blue on the map, but he is the president of the fifty," the word "fifty" is a synecdoche standing for the entire United States.
Let's take the first example of metonymy, "He is a man of the cloth." The writer is actually saying that he is a man of religion, such as a minister.
en.allexperts.com /q/Poetry-678/literary-devices.htm   (612 words)

  
 Proxy and Proximity: Metonymic Signing   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Metonymy is irresistibly and necessarily conventional.'[10] Such an assessment contrasts metonymy with metaphor and finds that metonymy cannot deliver truth or delight us with new knowledge through drawing attention to occult resemblances.
Inherent in the devaluation of metonymy as an accident of neighbourhood, a matter of contingency, is a dismissal of context and contextual relativism.
The objective, however, is not to topple metaphor and crown metonymy; it is rather to scrutinize metonymy and observe its difference from and interplay with metaphor.
www.utpjournals.com /product/utq/582/582_matus.html   (3458 words)

  
 Generic metonymies and the grammar of English: motivation and constraints
Metonymy was first described in cognitive terms by Lakoff and Johnson (1980: 39) as a process which “allows us to conceptualize one thing by means of its relation to something else”.
An example of this metonymy is found in (1) where the partial scene of the dog leaving with its tail between its legs activates the full picture of the dog being punished and leaving in the form described.
The underlying source-in-target metonymy explains why it is possible to use a peripheral part of the scenario to refer to the whole of it and accounts for the easiness with which the hearer interprets them (see figure 1 and 2).
sincronia.cucsh.udg.mx /metonymy.htm   (7121 words)

  
 Metaphor, Metonymy, and Binding
The interaction of metaphor, metonymy, and binding is particularly evident in the canonical representation of "death" as "the Grim Reaper," a sinister, skeleton-like character holding a scythe and wearing a cowl (see Turner and Fauconnier 1995).
Similarly, Death in the input space of human dying is metonymically associated with priests: priests are stereotypically present at an event of death, and their institution is concerned with death and afterlife.
Under metonymy projection from Input 2, the printing press in the blend becomes the counterpart of the stronger object in Input 1, and the car in the blend becomes the counterpart of the weaker object in Input 1.
markturner.org /metmet.html   (4532 words)

  
 Wordwizard Clubhouse - substitute for intended subject [[synecdoche & metonymy]]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
In rhetoric METONYMY “is a figure of speech that consist of the use of one object or concept for that of another to which it is related, or of which it is a part.
Metonymy is similar, but uses something more generally or loosely associated with a concept to stand in for it.
The difference between synecdoche and metonymy is that in metonymy the word you employ is linked to the concept you are really talking about, but isn’t actually a part of it.
www.wordwizard.com /ch_forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=6593   (1244 words)

  
 The Purifying Of The Heavenly: Metonymy
To say something is called something "by metonymy" doesn't brush it away as a fact.
"Metonymy" is not a magic word to change a Yes to a No, or a fact into not a fact.
To say it is "metonymy," doesn't change the fact that God (the Supreme and All-Wise Authority) gave the name "SIN" to the evil principle in all human flesh.
www.antipas.org /books/purifying_heavenly/metonymy.html   (294 words)

  
 Metonymy and Conceptual Blending
Though the beverage and the company that makes the beverage have very different properties, the elements d' and c' are linked by a conventional metonymy that allows corporations to be identified by their products.
Our purpose in this essay was to show how metonymy operates over diverse instances of conceptual blending, as manifest in everyday language use, crafted literary artifacts, and modernist representational sculpture.
One consistent finding was the role metonymy seems to play in satisfying different and competing optimality principles during comprehension.
cogsci.ucsd.edu /~coulson/metonymy-new.htm   (6931 words)

  
 The Purifying Of The Heavenly: Metonymy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
To say something is called something "by metonymy" doesn't brush it away as a fact.
"Metonymy" is not a magic word to change a Yes to a No, or a fact into not a fact.
To say it is "metonymy," doesn't change the fact that God (the Supreme and All-Wise Authority) gave the name "SIN" to the evil principle in all human flesh.
www.west.net /~antipas/books/purifying_heavenly/metonymy.html   (294 words)

  
 metonymy2
Whenever you hear ``for example'' or ``more generally'' you know that metonymy is afoot.
Metonymy is important in mathematics because it is is the main internal process by which the raw material of mathematics is generated.
The urge to generalize is one of the forces that drive mathematical inquiry.
e-math.ams.org /featurecolumn/archive/metonymy2.html   (327 words)

  
 metaphorik.de - the online-journal about metaphor and metonymy
Metaphor and Metonymy are ubiquitous phenomena in everyday life.
The general interest of metaphorik.de therefore lies in offering a platform where the diversity of research on metaphor and metonymy is encouraged and respected in order to avoid a monoculture or a fragmentation of the scientific mind.
Their thematic and methodological differences rather are a result which is deeply rooted within the diversity and complexity of metaphor and metonymy as a phenomenon of everyday talk, literature, and discourse in mass media.
www.metaphorik.de /english/english.htm   (458 words)

  
 Metonymy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Metonymy is a figure of speech in which something related to an object is used to represent the object itself.
For example, if a sailor is referred to an "an old salt," the figure metonymy is being used because "salt" refers to the salty sea upon which the sailor sails.
If a sexist young man refers to a woman as a "skirt," he is using metonymy.
www.stedwards.edu /hum/klawitter/poetics/metonymy.html   (131 words)

  
 Contra Cabal 201-01-13 - Metaphor and Metonymy
Metonymy conveys metaphysically some incorporeal or intangible state as the corporeal or tangible and overlaps both metaphor (perspective) and synecdoche (representation).
Metonymy (literal contiguity) and metaphor (oral similarity) contain the power of both dialectic and rhetoric as two of the four tropes essential to the rebus principle.
Metonymy deals with the manipulation of scale in time and space and transforms the power of metaphor.
www.contracabal.org /201-01-13.html   (352 words)

  
 Metaphor, Metonymy, and Ethics in The Portrait of a Lady
For Jakobson, too, metaphor and metonymy are shorthand terms for what he calls the “two different semantic lines” along which a stretch of discourse may develop: “one topic,” he writes, “may lead to another either through their similarity [belonging to the same paradigm] or their contiguity [belonging to the same syntagm]” (63).
Metonymy for its part deals in items that are intimately linked to one another in real, syntagmatic contexts, without anyone claiming that they share a paradigmatic quality—not even temporarily, not even for the duration of the figure of speech.
When you say “The White House has decided,” the White House is a metonymy for the American President, not because that mansion would somehow (magically) enjoy the same power as this political leader, but because the White House happens to be the executive residence of the President of the United States.
mockingbird.creighton.edu /english/Buelens.htm   (3702 words)

  
 Metonymy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The following entries, metonymy and metonym, are freely excerpted and adapted from the on-line version of the Oxford English Dictionary.
Metonymy: A figure of speech which consists in substituting for the name of a thing the name of an attribute of it or of something closely related.
Metonymy is common in cigarette advertising in countries where legislation prohibits depictions of the cigarettes themselves or of people using them.
www.swarthmore.edu /Humanities/passo1/metonymy.html   (256 words)

  
 metonymy2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Whenever you hear ``for example'' or ``more generally'' you know that metonymy is afoot.
Metonymy is important in mathematics because it is is the main internal process by which the raw material of mathematics is generated.
The urge to generalize is one of the forces that drive mathematical inquiry.
www.math.sunysb.edu /~tony/whatsnew/column/metonymy-1199/metonymy2.html   (327 words)

  
 {lime tree}: Metonymy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
In particular, he questions Roman Jakobson's famous discussion of metaphor and metonymy: he thinks that Jakobson presents a misleading dichotomy, since both metaphor and metonymy work generally via a logic of substitution.
The White House is a metonymy for the Administration, but the relation between the White House and the Administration is not analogous to the relation between a noun and a verb in a sentence, as far as I can see." Maybe this is too clever/spacey by half, but for me that's exactly how it works.
Calling the Administration the White House is like condensing the sentence "The Administration, who were in the White House, decided to bomb the crap out of a bunch of innocent people" into a compact unit: subject merges with relative clause economically in a clean substitutive wipe, as through Flash animation of text on a screen.
limetree.ksilem.com /archives/000195.html   (658 words)

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