Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Metre


Related Topics
SI

In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Online Conversion - The meter
Although it was later determined that the first prototype metre bar was short by a fifth of a millimetre due to miscalculation of the flattening of the earth, this length became the standard.
In 1893, the standard metre was first measured with an interferometer by Albert A. Michelson, the inventor of the device and an advocate of using some particular wavelength of light as a standard of distance.
However, the International Prototype Metre remained the standard until 1960, when the eleventh CGPM defined the metre in the new SI system as equal to 1,650,763.73 wavelengths of the orange-red emission line in the electromagnetic spectrum of the krypton-86 atom in a vacuum.
www.onlineconversion.com /article_meter.htm   (844 words)

  
 BIPM - definition of the metre
The Michelson interferometer was used at the BIPM (by Michelson and Benoît) to determine the length of the metre in terms of the wavelength of the red line of cadmium.
The CGPM adopted a definition of the metre in terms of the wavelength in vacuum of the radiation corresponding to a transition between specified energy levels of the
The CGPM redefined the metre as the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a specific fraction of a second.
www.bipm.org /en/si/history-si/evolution_metre.html   (770 words)

  
  Metre and Tal in North Indian Music
Metre for the Western musician and musicologist seems therefore to be a simple concept, a supposition which is confirmed by the brevity of entries on metre in music dictionaries such as the New Grove (Grove 6, 1980).
The relationship between metre and rhythm has two major and complementary aspects: metre is inferred (partly or wholly subjectively) on the basis of the evidence presented by rhythm, (14) while rhythm is interpreted in terms of its relationship to that metre.
Metre (tal) is an abstract framework primarily constructed in the mind of the performer and represented by a clap pattern and/or a theka, from which it may in turn be reconstructed by a listener.
www.open.ac.uk /Arts/music/mclayton/metre.htm   (7663 words)

  
  Guide to Verse Forms - Metre   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The metre is the rhythm of a poem.
Repeating patterns in the metre are an important element - some would say the main element - in the structure of poetry.
It is used widely in rhymed poetry; it is also the metre of blank verse e.g.
www.noggs.dsl.pipex.com /vf/metre.htm   (1124 words)

  
  Metre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The metre is defined as equal to the length of the path travelled by light in absolute vacuum during a time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second.
A corresponding unit of area is the square metre and a corresponding unit of volume is the cubic metre.
In 1893, the standard metre was first measured with an interferometer by Albert A. Michelson, the inventor of the device and an advocate of using some particular wavelength of light as a standard of distance.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Metre   (1172 words)

  
 Metre (music) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Metre or meter is the measurement of a musical line into measures of stressed and unstressed "beats", indicated in Western music notation by a symbol called a time signature.
Metre is an entrainment, a representation of changing aspects of music as patterns of temporal invariance, allowing listeners to synchronize their perception, cognition, and behaviour with musical rhythms.
Rhythm is distinguished from metre in that rhythms are patterns of duration while "metre involves our initial perception as well as subsequent anticipation of a series of beats that we abstract from the rhythm surface of the music as it unfolds in time" (London 2004, p.4-5).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Metre_(music)   (1108 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
micrometre (formerly micron) = 1 millionth of a metre
The metre was originally defined in 1791 by the French Academy of Sciences as 1/10,000,000 of the distance along the Earth's surface from the North Pole to the Equator along the meridian of Paris and on April 7, 1795 France adopted the metre as its official unit of length.
In 1983 the General Conference on Weights and Measures defined the metre as the distance traveled by light in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second (that is, the speed of light in a vacuum was defined to be 299,792,458 metres per second).
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/m/me/metre.html   (339 words)

  
 Metre - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The metre, symbol: m, is the basic unit of distance (or of "length", in the parlance of the physical sciences) in the International System of Units.
A metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in an absolute vacuum during a time interval of exactly 1/299,792,458 of a second.
In 1983 the current metre was defined by a relationship to the speed of light in a vacuum.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Metre   (1550 words)

  
 Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Metre   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The metre or (in American English) meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length.
It is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in absolute vacuum during a time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second.
1791 March 30 — The French National Assembly accepts the proposal by the French Academy of Sciences that the new definition for the metre be equal to one ten-millionth of the length of the earth's meridian along a quadrant (one-fourth the polar circumference of the earth).
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Metre   (899 words)

  
 12 Metre Challenge
Welcome to the home of the St. Maarten "America's Cup" 12 Metre Challenge.
Enjoy the photos and imagine yourself in the picture, racing one of these magnificent 12 metre racing yachts.
N.A. USA Mailing Address : St Maarten 12 Metre Challenge, The Mailbox 3295, PO Box 523882.
www.12metre.com   (91 words)

  
 One Metre: Metric in Canada
NEW "One Metre" is now a member of the Canadian Metric Association.
It has been over 30 years since we were first introduced to the metre, litre, kilogram, and Celsius.
The following letter was sent to One Metre by Paul Reid.
members.shaw.ca /gw.peterson/metric.html   (570 words)

  
 Metre   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Historically, the metre was defined by the French Academy of Sciences as the length between two marks on a platinum-iridium bar (which was designed to represent 1/10,000,000 of the distance from the equator to the north pole through Paris).
In 1893, the standard metre was first measured with an interferometer by Albert A. Michelson, the inventor of the device and an advocate of using some particular wavelength of light as a standard of distance.
The French National Assembly accepts the proposal by the French Academy of Sciences that the new definition for the metre be equal to one ten-millionth of the length of the Earth's meridian along a quadrant through Paris, that is the distance from the equator to the north pole.
en.filepoint.de /info/Metre   (1221 words)

  
 Metre and Rhythm
For if metre is not perceived in the same way by individuals in a group, and is not necessarily explicit in the music, then part of teaching ballet - which relies greatly on coherence between music and movement in groups - must be to "manage" the perception of metre[2].
In practice, this means teaching the basic components of metre - pulse, tactus, duple, triple, compound and additive metres - and using these terms as analytical tools to aid both the perception of metre and the learning of steps or movements which have to be performed in particular metres.
Metre is the term used to describe patterns of pulses defined by the prominence of some pulses (by means of accent, for example) over others.
www.jsmusic.org.uk /music/metre_index.html   (4241 words)

  
 Metre and Scansion
Metre is the term used to describe the rhythmic arrangement of the accented and unaccented syllables in verse, and so the foot (See Verse page) is also known as a metric foot.
The analysis of the composition of a verse is known as scanning or scansion.
However it is important to remember that metre is not a template or pattern to be followed slavishly by the writer in producing a piece, but rather a means of describing what has been written.
www.scribblingrivalry.com /rsvp_metre.htm   (1552 words)

  
 metre.info – Introduction
The CGPM is the highest institution of the Convention of the Metre.
The CIPM was established by the Convention of the Metre in 1875.
The CIPM supervises the BIPM and the affairs of the Convention of the Metre.
www.metre.info /intro.htm   (3204 words)

  
 Search Results for "Metre"
9 The metre of Pearl is a stanza of twelve lines with four accents, rimed according...
Variety in dialect and metre in the English Mysteries and Miracle-plays.
In the matter of metre, the most striking feature common to English religious plays is the great...
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?FILTER=&query=Metre   (321 words)

  
 Literary Encyclopedia: Metre / Meter   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Metre (British) or Meter (American) is the regulated patterning of speech-rhythm (see prosody) so as to produce a partial resemblance or equivalence between successive segments of verse, usually called lines.
Metre has traditionally been a defining feature of verse (but see free verse).
This is typically the four-beat metre of popular “chantable” verse such as traditional nursery rhymes, protest chants and the like, in which the beats tend to be relatively evenly timed in performance.
www.litencyc.com /php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=1217   (337 words)

  
 Common Metre
As used in church hymns, metre is the pattern of syllable counts in the lines of a verse.
Common metre, short metre and long metre are almost always referred to by their letter abbreviations (CM, SM, LM).
Other metres, of which there are many, are simply referred to by their pattern.
www.churchmusic.ca /common_metre1.htm   (1071 words)

  
 metre - Search Results - ninemsn Encarta
Metre (measurement), basic SI unit of length or distance.
It is defined as the distance travelled by light in a vacuum in a time interval of...
Metric System, a decimal system of physical units, named after its unit of length, the metre (Greek, metron, “measure”).
au.encarta.msn.com /metre.html   (109 words)

  
 metre Computer Encyclopedia Enterprise Resource Directory Complete Guide to Internet   (Site not responding. Last check: )
From 1889 to 1960, the metre was defined to be the distance between two scratches in a platinum-iridium bar kept in the vault beside the Standard Kilogram at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures near Paris.
This replaced an earlier definition as 10^-7 times the distance between the North Pole and the Equator along a meridian through Paris; unfortunately, this had been based on an inexact value of the circumference of the Earth.
It is now defined as the length of the path traveled by light in a vacuum in the time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second.
www.jaysir.com /computer-encyclopedia/m/metre-computer-terms.htm   (148 words)

  
 metre   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Duple verse (a metre with predominantly single offbeats) is as typical of syllable-stress verse as it is of strong-stress verse.
Triple syllable-stress metre is not uncommon either, but it is more of a problem as it tends to fall into the four-beat formation of strong-stress metre and thus to override limitations in the number of syllables.
In identifying the metre we must be aware that where in syllable-stress scanning we experience promotion to beat position and demotion from beat position, foot-scansion registers substitution, that is to say, the employment of a foot different from the base foot (dominant foot) of the line.
www.mfi.uni-miskolc.hu /sarbu/metre.htm   (2816 words)

  
 Metre - Engineering - a Wikia wiki
The metre (Commonwealth English[[1]]) or meter (American English [2]]) (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length.
May 8 1790 — The National Assembly (French Revolution) [[10]]decides that the length of the new metre would be equal to the length of a pendulum with a half-period of one second.
March 30 1791 — The French National Assembly accepts the proposal by the French Academy of Sciences [[11]]that the new definition for the metre be equal to one ten-millionth of the length of the earth's meridian (geography)[[12]] along a quadrant (one-fourth the polar circumference of the earth).
engineering.wikia.com /wiki/Metre   (406 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.