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Topic: Metre per second squared


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SI

In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
  Metre per second squared - Biocrawler
Metres per second squared is the SI derived unit of acceleration (scalar) and (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds and again divided by time in seconds.
The SI derived unit of force, the newton, is equal to one "kilogram metre per second squared", meaning that a force of one newton is needed to give an acceleration of one metre per second squared to a mass of one kilogram.
This is an illustration of Newton's second law (see Newton's laws of motion) in its simplest form, where acceleration is defined as the rate of change of velocity.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Metre_per_second_squared   (154 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
The metre (or meter) per second squared is the SI derived unit of acceleration.
It may be better understood when phrased as "metre per second per second"—in other words, the increase in speed (in metres per second) that is achieved each second.
The SI derived unit of force, the newton, is one kilogram metre per second squared, meaning that a force of one newton will give an acceleration of one metre per second squared to a mass of one kilogram.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=meter_per_second_squared   (183 words)

  
  Force
which is derived from Newton’s second law of motion, F is the force in newtons, m the mass in kilograms and a the acceleration in meters per second squared.
It is the mass that accelerates by one foot per second squared when a force of one lbf is exerted on it.
This is the mass that accelerates at one metre per second squared when pushed by a force of one kgf.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/fo/Force_(physics).html   (1139 words)

  
  Metre per second squared - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Metres per second squared is the SI derived unit of acceleration, defined by distance or displacement in metres divided by time in seconds and again divided by time in seconds.
The SI derived unit of force, the newton, is equal to one "kilogram metre per second squared", meaning that a force of one newton is needed to give an acceleration of one metre per second squared to a mass of one kilogram.
This is an illustration of Newton's second law (see Newton's laws of motion) in its simplest form, where acceleration is defined as the rate of change of velocity.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Metre_per_second_squared   (205 words)

  
 [No title]
newton metre is equal to the kilogram metre squared per second squared.
However, it does not happen that the newton metre is equal to the newton
metre per second, which is what your equations actually say, if you can
www.mathforum.org /kb/plaintext.jspa?messageID=123606   (383 words)

  
 BIPM - unit names
In both English and in French, however, when the name of a derived unit is formed from the names of individual units by multiplication, then either a space or a hyphen is used to separate the names of the individual units.
In both English and in French modifiers such as "squared" or "cubed" are used in the names of units raised to powers, and they are placed after the unit name.
However, in the case of area or volume, as an alternative the modifiers "square" or "cubic" may be used, and these modifiers are placed before the unit name, but this applies only in English.
www.bipm.org /en/si/si_brochure/chapter5/5-2.html   (306 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: List of physical quantities
The amount of mass per unit length of a 1-dimensional object
P represents the physical quantity of power Mechanical power In physics, power (symbol: P) is the amount of work W done per unit of time t.
In physics and chemistry, an extensive quantity (also referred to as an extensive variable) is a physical quantity whose value is proportional to the size of the system it describes.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/List-of-physical-quantities   (385 words)

  
 UK metric association
The metre is a unit of distance and is the basis for measuring length, area and volume.
The metre was originally derived from one ten millionth of the distance from Earth's pole the equator but has been refined several times to tie it to more precisely measured physical constants.
newtons per metre of length (see section on derived units for a description of the newton).
www.metric.org.uk /whatis/definitions.htm   (1366 words)

  
 [No title]
A square rod; the 160th part of an acre."""], "sabin": [(m,1/10.7639104167097),"",u"""A unit of acoustic absorption equivalent to the absorption by a square foot of a surface that absorbs all incident sound.
It is the quantity of electricity conveyed in one second by the current produced by an electro-motive force of one volt acting in a circuit having a resistance of one ohm, or the quantity transferred by one amp`ere in one second.
One hyl is the mass that is accelerated at one meter per second per second by one kilogram of force.
unihedron.com /projects/gonvert/downloads/gonvert.py   (6025 words)

  
 theory:omstd-units_metric1
This symbol represents the measure of one metre per second.
This symbol represents the measure of one metre per second squared.
This symbol represents the measure of one Newton per square metre.
raspberry.eecs.iu-bremen.de:8081 /SWiM/index.jsp?title=theory:omstd-units_metric1&action=view   (284 words)

  
 joosse.info
The metre is the length equal to 1 650763,73 wavelengths in vacuum of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the levels 2 p10 and 5 d5, of the krypton-86 atom.[ 11th CGPM (1960), Resolution 6.]
The second is the duration of 9 192631 770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium-133 atom.
The candela is the luminous intensity, in the perpendicular direction of a surface of 1/600000 square metre of a flbody at the temperature of freezing platinum under a pressure of 101 325 newtons per square metre.
joosse.info /website/index.php?main=general/SI.htm   (323 words)

  
 Flotte's Outline of History Appendix: Science   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The luminous intensity, in the perpendicular direction, of a surface of 1/60 square centimetre of a fl body at the freezing temperature of Platinum under a pressure of 101,325 pascal (1 atmosphere).
The solid angle subtended at the centre of a sphere of radius r by a portion of the surface of the sphere having an area r
The angle subtended at the centre of a circle by an arc of the circumference equal in length to the radius of the circle.
www.flotte2.com /science   (192 words)

  
 SLI | Basic Science | Units of Measurement   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The siemens is a unit of conductance and is derived from the units ampere squared seconds cubed per kilogram per metre squared (A
A newton is the force required to accelerate a mass of one kilogram at one metre per second squared.
The pascal is a unit of pressure and stress and is derived from the units of kilogram per metre per second squared.
safetyline.wa.gov.au /institute/level2/course15/lecture42/l42_05.asp   (1021 words)

  
 Metre
The metre, symbol: m, is the basic unit of distance (or of "length", in the parlance of the physical sciences) in the International System of Units.
The internationally-accepted spelling of the unit in English is "metre", although the American English spelling meter is a common variant.
A metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in an absolute vacuum during a time interval of exactly 1/299,792,458 of a second.
www.kiwipedia.com /metres.html   (192 words)

  
 Tangram Technology Ltd. - Metric system and conversion factors
The unit of energy in all forms is the joule (newton x metre), and of power the joule per second (watt); thus the variously defined calories, together with the kilowatt hour, the Btu and the horsepower are all superseded.
In the metric system of measurements, the principal unit for length is the metre; the principal unit for capacity, the litre; and the principal unit for weight, the gramme.
For cubic measures, cubic metre, cubic decimetre (litre), cubic centimetre, and cubic millimetre.
www.tangram.co.uk /GI-InfoSheet15-MetricSystem&ConversionFactors.html   (649 words)

  
 iraqi force information
For example, in imperial engineering units, F is in "pounds force" or "lbf", m is in "pounds mass" or "lb", and a is in feet per second squared.
This is the mass that accelerates at one metre per second squared when pushed by a force of one [Kilogram forcekgf]].
Another unit of force called the poundal (pdl) is defined as the force that accelerates 1 lbm at 1 foot per second squared.
www.global-terror.com /iraq/iraqi-force.htm   (1768 words)

  
 Force   (Site not responding. Last check: )
a is the acceleration, measured in metre per second squared
For example, in imperial engineering units, F is in "pounds force" or "lbf", m is in "pounds mass" or "lb", and a is in feet per second squared.
Another unit of force called the poundal (pdl) is defined as the force that accelerates 1 lbm at 1 foot per second squared.
www.freedownloadsoft.com /info/force.html   (1727 words)

  
 PowerPedia:Force - PESWiki
Charles Coulomb is credited for experimental discovery of the inverse square law of interaction between electric charges using torsion balance (1784).
He asserted in his second law of motion that this behavior of constant momentum increase was characteristic of all forces-- including the "forces" of ordinary experience, such as tension or the stress produced by pushing on an object with a finger.
In Imperial engineering units, if F is measured in "pounds force" or "lbf", and a in feet per second squared, then m must be measured in slugs.
peswiki.com /index.php/PowerPedia:Force   (2324 words)

  
 Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Metre per second   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds.
Swimming at the 2004 Summer Olympics - Women's 50 metre Freestyle
Swimming at the 2004 Summer Olympics - Women's 100 metre Freestyle
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Metre_per_second   (433 words)

  
 SI Units
The seven base units are the metre (m), kilogram (kg), second (s), ampere (A), kelvin (K), candela (cd) and mole (mol).
Larger or smaller multiples of these units of more convenient size are obtained by combining the unit with an appropriate prefix selected from a specific series.
The correct spelling of the common units is metre, litre and gram.
whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au /techinfo/units_si.html   (780 words)

  
 Unit Systems in Electromagnetism
In the unit system called CGS (for Centimetres Grams Seconds) force is measured in dynes: the force required to accelerate a mass of one gram at one centimetre per second squared.
The approach taken by the SI In the SI, distance is measured in metres and force is measured in newtons (the force which when applied to a mass of one kilogram accelerates it at one metre per second squared).
H) of one ampere per metre at the centre of a circular loop of wire of diameter one metre when it carries one ampere of current.
www.ee.surrey.ac.uk /Workshop/advice/coils/unit_systems   (3391 words)

  
 Conversion of units - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Since 0.3048 metre per foot have infinite precision, the precision of the answer is determined by the precision of the 6 ft figure; if, for example, you are defining the fathom, expressing it with 5 significant figures is correct.
Thus, Earth escape velocity is about 7 miles per second, or 40,000 kilometres per hour.
In physics, the pound of mass is sometimes written lbm to distinguish it from the pound-force (lbf).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Conversion_of_units   (1017 words)

  
 frce information,force   (Site not responding. Last check: )
For example, in imperial engineering units, F is in "pounds frce" or "lbf", m is in "pounds mass" or "lbm", anda is in feet per second squared.
1 lbf is the frcerequired to accelerate 1 lbm at 32.174 ft per second squared, since 32.174 ft per second squared is the acceleration due toterrestrial gravity at sea level.
This is the mass that accelerates atone metre per second squared when pushed by a frce of one kgf.
www.vsearchmedia.com /frce.html   (1469 words)

  
 foce information,force   (Site not responding. Last check: )
For example, in imperial engineering units, F is in "pounds foce" or "lbf", m is in "pounds mass" or "lbm", anda is in feet per second squared.
1 lbf is the focerequired to accelerate 1 lbm at 32.174 ft per second squared, since 32.174 ft per second squared is the acceleration due toterrestrial gravity at sea level.
This is the mass that accelerates atone metre per second squared when pushed by a foce of one kgf.
www.vsearchmedia.com /foce.html   (1469 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Gravity Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Gravitational acceleration, and acceleration in general, is measured in metre per second squared or in galileoss or gees.
Johannes Kepler inferred that the planets move in their orbits under some influence or force exerted by the sun; but the laws of motion were not then sufficiently developed, nor were Kepler's ideas of force sufficiently clear, to make a precise statement of the nature of the force.
The acceleration due to gravity at the Earth's surface is, by convention, equal to 9.80665 metres per second squared.
www.ipedia.com /gravity.html   (3421 words)

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