Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Michael Faraday


Related Topics

In the News (Mon 22 Jul 19)

  
  BBC - History - Michael Faraday (1791-1867)
Faraday was a British chemist and physicist who contributed significantly to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.
Michael Faraday was born on 22 September 1791 in south London.
Faraday's scientific knowledge was harnessed for practical use through various official appointments, including scientific adviser to Trinity House (1836-1865) and Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich (1830-1851).
www.bbc.co.uk /history/historic_figures/faraday_michael.shtml   (405 words)

  
  Michael Faraday - LoveToKnow 1911
MICHAEL FARADAY (1791-1867), English chemist and physicist, was born at Newington, Surrey, on the 22nd of September 1791.
A specimen of one of these heavy glasses afterwards became historically important as the substance in which Faraday detected the rotation of the plane of polarization of light when the glass was placed in the magnetic field, and also as the substance which was first repelled by the poles of the magnet.
Faraday had for a long time kept in view the possibility of using a ray of polarized light as a means of investigating the condition of transparent bodies when acted on by electric and magnetic forces.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Michael_Faraday   (2225 words)

  
 Michael Faraday
Michael Faraday, the discoverer of electro-magnetic induction, electro-magnetic rotations, the magneto-optical effect, diamagnetism, field theory and much else besides, was born in Newington Butts (the area of London now known as the Elephant and Castle) on 22 September 1791.
In 1805 at the age of fourteen Faraday was apprenticed as a bookbinder to George Riebau of Blandford Street.
Faraday was part of this effort and on 3 and 4 September 1821 in his basement laboratory at the Royal Institution, he undertook a set of experiments which culminated in his discovery of electro-magnetic rotation - the principle behind the electric motor.
www.corrosion-doctors.org /Biographies/FaradayBio.htm   (915 words)

  
 Michael Faraday - Information from Reference.com
Michael Faraday was born in Newington Butts, near present-day Elephant and Castle in South London, England.
Faraday used "static", batteries, and "animal electricity" to produce the phenomena of electrostatic attraction, electrolysis, magnetism, etc. He concluded that, contrary to scientific opinion of the time, the divisions between the various "kinds" of electricity were illusory.
Faraday was interred in the Sandemanian plot in Highgate Cemetery.
www.reference.com /search?r=11&q=Michael%20Faraday   (3317 words)

  
  Michael Faraday - MSN Encarta
Faraday was born on September 22, 1791, in Newington, Surrey, England.
Faraday was the recipient of many scientific honors, including the Royal and Rumford medals of the Royal Society; he was also offered the presidency of the society but declined the honor.
In experimenting with magnetism, Faraday made two discoveries of great importance; one was the existence of diamagnetism, and the other was the fact that a magnetic field has the power to rotate the plane of polarized light passing through certain types of glass.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761577227/Faraday_Michael.html   (467 words)

  
  Michael Faraday - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Michael Faraday, FRS (September 22, 1791 – August 25, 1867) was a British chemist and physicist (who considered himself a natural philosopher) who contributed significantly to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.
Michael Faraday was born in Newington Butts, near present-day Elephant and Castle in south London.
Faraday was also a devout Christian and a member of the small Sandemanian denomination, an offshoot of the Church of Scotland.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Michael_Faraday   (1608 words)

  
 Faraday, Michael - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Faraday, Michael
Faraday was born in Newington, Surrey, the son of a flsmith.
Faraday is thus also credited with the simultaneous discovery of electromagnetic induction, although the same discovery had been made in the same way by US physicist Joseph Henry in 1830.
Faraday then went on to point out that the energy of a magnet is in the field around it and not in the magnet itself, and he extended this basic conception of field theory to electrical and gravitational systems.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Faraday,+Michael   (1966 words)

  
 Michael Faraday
One of a flsmith's 10 children, Michael Faraday was born on Sept. 22, 1791, in Newington, Surrey.
Michael Faraday (1791 - 1867) was "one of the greatest physicists of the 19th century and one of the finest experimenters of all time.
Michael Faraday, the discoverer of electro-magnetic induction, electro-magnetic rotations, the magneto-optical effect, diamagnetism, field theory and much else besides, was born in Newington Butts (the area of London now known as the Elephant and Castle) on 22 September 1791.
www.lycos.com /info/michael-faraday.html   (575 words)

  
 The Royal Institution of Great Britain
Apart from the practical significance of this discovery, it was important as Faraday's interpretation of the phenomenon indicated that he was not a Newtonian in supposing that forces had to act rectilinearly.
Faraday also spent a considerable amount of time, especially in the early 1860s, working on various systems of electric light that were proposed.
During this period, Faraday pursued the consequence of his discovery of electro-magnetic induction, demonstrated the identity of electricities and revised entirely the theories of electro-chemistry (in the process coining now familiar words such as electrode, cathode and ion) and the nature of electricity.
www.rigb.org /heritage/faradaypage.jsp   (2528 words)

  
 Michael Faraday—God’s power and electric power
Michael Faraday was born in the village of Newington, Sussex, England, on Thursday, 22 September 1791.
Faraday went on to show that the electricity produced was the same regardless of how it was produced—by a magnetic field, by a chemical battery or as static electricity.
That Michael Faraday, poor uneducated son of a journeyman flsmith and a country maid was permitted to glimpse the beauty of the eternal laws of nature was a never-ending source of wonder to him.’
www.answersingenesis.org /creation/v12/i4/faraday.asp   (1554 words)

  
 Michael Faraday's Contributions to Electricity and Chemistry
Once Faraday discovered that electricity could be made by moving a magnet inside a wire coil, he was able to build the first electric motor.
Faraday is also remembered for his contributions to the study of chemistry.
Faraday lived his whole life in England, where he died on August 25, 1867.
sln.fi.edu /franklin/scientst/faraday.html   (185 words)

  
 Michael Faraday: Architects and Scientists: The Twickenham Museum
On his return, Faraday was again engaged by the Royal Institution and began the publication of numerous scientific articles increasingly in the field of experimental physics and leading eventually to major discoveries.
Faraday was a deeply religious man and, like his parents, a member of a breakaway Presbyterian sect, known as the Sandemanians*.
In 1848, as a result of private representations by the Prince Consort, Michael Faraday was awarded a Grace and Favour house in Hampton Court, free of all expenses for upkeep.
www.twickenham-museum.org.uk /detail.asp?ContentID=197   (772 words)

  
 Faraday   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Faraday was one of four children, all of whom were hard put to get enough to eat, since their father was often ill and incapable of working steadily.
Faraday saw the "lines of force" thus revealed as lines of tension in the medium, namely air, surrounding the magnet, and he soon discovered the law determining the production of electric currents by magnets: the magnitude of the current was dependent upon the number of lines of force cut by the conductor in unit time.
Faraday took the suggestion, passed a beam of plane-polarized light through the optical glass of high refractive index that he had developed in the 1820s, and then turned on an electromagnet so that its lines of force ran parallel to the light ray.
chem.ch.huji.ac.il /~eugeniik/history/faraday.htm   (5021 words)

  
 [No title]
Faraday is a fascinating subject for such an investigation both because he is one of the outstanding scientists of the nineteenth century and because he, like many other great scientists down the ages, had a very significant and distinctive religious perspective.
Faraday's confession of faith, at age 29, was then, so far as we know, not a conversion, but a formal and, in view of the strictness of Sandemanian discipline, a carefully weighed acceptance of the responsibilities of membership in a demanding spiritual fellowship, which he well understood.
Faraday was also concerned to disseminate the results of science in practical ways that brought material benefits to his fellow man. He saw the powers of nature as intended `always for our good' and therefore the understanding of nature as an opportunity for material improvement.
silas.psfc.mit.edu /Faraday   (4523 words)

  
 Biography of Michael Faraday   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Michael Faraday discovered many of the fundamental laws of physics and chemistry, despite the fact that he had virtually no formal education.
Despite Davy's objections, Faraday was elected to the Royal Society in 1824 and was made director of the laboratory at the Royal Institute in 1825.
After Faraday discovered, in 1831, that a changing magnetic field can induce a current, he performed a series of experiments that showed clearly that the induced EMF is equal to the rate of change of magnetic flux.
www.slcc.edu /schools/hum_sci/physics/whatis/biography/faraday.html   (565 words)

  
 A brief history of one of Nikola Tesla's heroes... Michael Faraday!   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Michael Faraday, who became one of the greatest scientists of the 19th century, began his career as a chemist.
Michael Faraday was born on September 22, 1791, in the country village of Newington, Surrey, now a part of South London.
Faraday offered "Thoughts on Ray Vibrations." Specifically referring to point atoms and their infinite fields of force, he suggested that the lines of electric and magnetic force associated with these atoms might, in fact, serve as the medium by which light waves were propagated.
home.earthlink.net /~drestinblack/faraday.htm   (3524 words)

  
 The religion of Michael Faraday, physicist
Faraday's parents were members of the obscure religious denomination of the Sandemanians, and Faraday himself, shortly after his marriage, at the age of thirty, joined the same sect, to which he adhered till his death.
Faraday was a devoutly Christian member of the Sandemanians, which significantly influenced upon him and strongly affected the way in which he approached and interpreted nature.
Faraday himself did not join the church until one month after his marriage to Sarah Barnard (he was 30, she 21); he became an elder and had to preach occasionally (a book of four of his sermons was printed; a Sandeman lent me a copy when I was at Oxford.
www.adherents.com /people/pf/Michael_Faraday.html   (1041 words)

  
 Inventor Michael Faraday
Faraday was elected to the Royal Society in 1824 and the following year was appointed director of the laboratory of the Royal Institution.
Faraday was the recipient of many scientific honors, including the Royal and Rumford medals of the Royal Society; he was also offered the presidency of the society but declined the honor.
In experimenting with magnetism, Faraday made two discoveries of great importance; one was the existence of diamagnetism, and the other was the fact that a magnetic field has the power to rotate the plane of polarized light passing through certain types of glass.
www.ideafinder.com /history/inventors/faraday.htm   (961 words)

  
 [No title]
Davy, who had the greatest influence on Faraday's thinking, had shown in 1807 that the metals sodium and potassium can be precipitated from their compounds by an electric current, a process known as electrolysis.
Faraday's vigorous pursuit of these experiments led in 1834 to what became known as Faraday's laws of electrolysis.
Faraday's ideas about conservation of energy led him to believe that since an electric current could cause a magnetic field, a magnetic field should be able to produce an electric current.
www.phy.hr /~dpaar/fizicari/xfaraday.html   (613 words)

  
 Science & Religion || Michael Faraday
Michael Faraday was among the scientific giants of the nineteenth century.
Faraday's faith influenced several aspects of his science: his motivation for research; his theoretical orientation; the experimental problems he pursued; his interpretation of phenomena; and his public communication of science.
Faraday was unusual for his time in conceiving electricity and magnetism more in terms of fields of force than in terms of distinct particles with forces acting at a distance.
www1.umn.edu /ships/religion/faraday.htm   (1281 words)

  
 Magnetic Field Lines -- History
Magnetic field lines were introduced by Michael Faraday (1791-1867) who named them "lines of force." Faraday was one of the great discoverers in electricity and magnetism, responsible for the principles by which electric generators and transformers work, as well as for the foundations of electrochemistry.
Faraday, however, felt that they represented more, that space containing magnetic "lines of force" was no longer empty but acquired certain physical properties.
Faraday's younger colleague James Clerk Maxwell, a mathematical physicist of enormous creative insight, fleshed out these ideas in rigorous mathematical terms, and "Maxwell's equations" are now the cornerstone of electromagnetic theory.
www.phy6.org /Education/whfldlns.html   (685 words)

  
 Michael Faraday pioneer scientist
Michael Faraday was honourerd by his portait appearing on the British £20 note, together with an illustration of him lecturing at the Royal Institution
The `Faraday dark space', observed with electrical discharges in gases (for example, as in fluorescent tubes), pays tribute to him, and the `Faraday effect' in magneto-optics was one of his triumphs later in his career.
Faraday had a profound sense of the fallibility of man. This undoubtedly derived from reading the Bible with understanding, but two specific influences might also be identified.
www.biblicalcreation.org.uk /educational_issues/bcs010.html   (1194 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.