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Topic: Mieszko I of Poland


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  c. Poland. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
Mieszko was converted to Christianity by Bohemian missionaries, probably for political reasons, to deprive the Germans of any further excuse for aggression.
MIESZKO II, whose reign marked the culmination of feudal separatism.
Poland was divided into five principalities (Silesia, Great Poland, Masovia, Sandomir, Kraków) for his sons; Kraków was established as the capital, and was to go, with the title of grand duke, to the eldest member of the house of Piast.
www.bartleby.com /67/486.html   (975 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Mieszko I of Poland
The early career of Mieszko was dominated by fighting with the tribes of Wieletes and Volinians south of the Baltic Sea, and their ally, the Saxon count Wichman.
Mieszko was baptised in 966, probably under the influence of his Christian first wife and in order to avoid confrontation with the Holy Roman Empire to the west; he built a church dedicated to Saint George at Gniezno.
Mieszko I had pledged allegiance to emperor Otto I the Great, to Gero, Count of the Eastern March (ruled from 937-965), to emperor Otto II and again to emperor Otto III.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/mi/Mieszko_I_of_Poland   (568 words)

  
 Mieszko I of Poland Information
Mieszko was baptised in 966, probably under the influence of his Christian first wife or perhaps in order to avoid confrontation with the Holy Roman Empire to the west.
One medieval chronicle (Thietmari chronicon too) also states that Mieszko pledged allegiance to Margrave Gero, but since the chronicle itself is believed to be an abstract of another which does not mention this, it is now generally considered to be a myth.
This document indexes the lands of (Mieszko), referred to as "Dagome" in the document, and his wife, former nun Oda and her sons by him.
www.bookrags.com /Mieszko_I   (747 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Mieszko I
One medieval chronicle also states that Mieszko pledged allegiance to Margrave Gero, but since the chronicle itself is believed to be an abstract of another which does not mention this, it is now generally considered to be a myth.
Sigrid the Haughty, Gunhilda, Sigrid Storråda, Świętosława, (967 - 1014) was the daughter of mythical Burislav (almost certainly Mieszko I of Poland and Dubrawka).
Lestko (also Lestek, Leszek) is the second legendary duke of Poland, and son of Siemowit, born probably 930/940 Though proof of his actual existence is unclear, he had to have been a major figure in his time, due to the fact that before Poland existed as a state, the...
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Mieszko-I   (3657 words)

  
 Ancestors and Family of Mieszko II Lambert of Poland   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mieszko returned soon, but this time he was forced to pledge allegiance to the German Emperor, and Poland was divided between him, his brothers Otton and Bezprym, and a mysterious Thiedric (probably nephew or cousin).
Casimir I of Poland, son of Mieszko, was either expelled by this uprising, or the uprising was caused by expelling by aristocracy.
Mieszko married Richeza of Palatine, daughter of Ezzo of Lotharingia and Matilda of Saxony, in 1013.
nygaard.howards.net /files/10.htm   (641 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Mieszko I of Poland
Mieszko was baptised in 966 (probably under the influence of his Christian first wife or maybe in order to avoid confrontation with the Holy Roman Empire to the west) he built a church dedicated to Saint George at Gniezno and in 968 he founded the first Polish cathedral in Poznań; dedicated to Saint Peter.
Mieszko I had pledged allegiance to emperor Otto I the Great, to emperor Otto II and again to emperor Otto III, however there is much dispute from the Polish side over this fact - mainly whether he was vassal from whole Poland, or from part Poland (the disputed fragment is "usque Varta fluvium").
One medieval chronicle also mentions that Mieszko pledged allegiance to margrave Gero, but since the chronicle itself is believed to be abstract of another which does not mention that fact, this is generally accepted nowaday as myth.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Mieszko_I   (839 words)

  
 Mieszko I - Encyclopedia.com
Mieszko I or Mieczyslaw I, c.922-992, duke of Poland (962-92), the first important member of the Piast dynasty.
To avert this threat, Mieszko obtained (c.963) a friendly treaty with Holy Roman Emperor Otto I, to whom he agreed to pay tribute.
The beginning of Poland's existence as a state was marked by the conversion of Polish Count Mieszko I and his court in 966 C.E. Since then, Polish culture has been permeated by the Christian religion, with the Roman Catholic...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Mieszko1.html   (787 words)

  
 Mieszko I and Boleslaw Chrobry: The Origins of the Polish State
In that year, however, Mieszko, Poland's ruler, accepted Christianity and with it the literate Latin civilization of which the Church was guardian, protector and advocate.
Poland's neighbors, Germany to the west and Bohemia to the south, were Christian states and in those times, if you were a pagan state, that was reason enough to be invaded and conquered.
Mieszko donated the heartland of Poland to the papacy, to Pope John XII, making it part of what was known as the Patrimony of St. Peter.
info-poland.buffalo.edu /classroom/orig/mieszko.html   (3400 words)

  
 Polish History - Part 1
Poland of the 10th through 12th centuries, as many other states of the early Middle Ages, was a monarchy treated by the ruler as a dynastic property and heritage--a patriarchy.
Thanks to the decision of Mieszko I, Poland was provided with the foundations of her development and participation in the commonwealth of the states and nations of Europe.
Poland's independence was manifested by the royal coronations of her rulers (Boleslaus the Brave in 1025 and Mieszko II in 1025.)
www.poloniatoday.com /history1.htm   (1373 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mieszko was baptised in 966, probably under the influence of his Christian first wife or perhaps in order to avoid confrontation with the Holy Roman Empire to the west.
One medieval chronicle (Thietmari chronicon too) also states that Mieszko pledged allegiance to Margrave Gero, but since the chronicle itself is believed to be an abstract of another which does not mention this, it is now considered to be a myth.
It is possible that name Mieszko is a nickname formed from the second part of name Dago-mir as it is common in Poland to form polish nicknames by adding –ko at the end of name.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Mieszko_I   (1237 words)

  
 Mieszko I of Poland   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mieszko was baptised in 966 (probably under the influence of his Christian first wife or maybe in order to avoidconfrontation with the Holy Roman Empire to the west) he built achurch dedicated to Saint George at Gniezno.
Mieszko I had pledged allegiance to emperor Otto I the Great, toemperor Otto II and again to emperor OttoIII, however there is much dispute from the Polish side over this fact - mainly whether he was vassal from whole Poland, orfrom part Poland (the disputed fragment is "usque Varta fluvium").
One medieval chronicle also mentions that Mieszko pledgedallegiance to margrave Gero, but since the chronicle itself is believed to be abstract of another which does not mention thatfact, this is generally accepted nowaday as myth.
www.therfcc.org /mieszko-i-of-poland-154397.html   (638 words)

  
 [No title]
Mieszko was the first (historically known) Piast duke of the Polanians, which gave that name to a country later called Poland.
Mieszko was not his actual name, but given at a later time.
In 981 Mieszko I lost the land known as Grody Czerwieñskie to Vladimir I, prince of Kiev.
www.angelfire.com /scifi2/rsolecki/mieszko_I.html   (1085 words)

  
 For the Children   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Poland’s name “Polska” is derived from the word “Polanie” or “plains people” one of several Slavic groups that settled the Northern European plain between the Oder and Vistula Rivers.
Poland’s army won many battles but the struggles were bitter and lasted for months resulting in the devastation of towns and villages.
Poland, with her traditions of tolerance and freedom, was considered politically dangerous.
freenet.buffalo.edu /pacb/projects/children/history.html   (999 words)

  
 Poland (03/07)
Poland today is ethnically almost homogeneous (98% Polish), in contrast with the World War II period, when there were significant ethnic minorities--4.5 million Ukrainians, 3 million Jews, 1 million Belorussians, and 800,000 Germans.
Poland was the first former centrally planned economy in central Europe to end its recession and return to growth in the early 1990s.
Poland continues to be a regional leader in support and participation in the NATO Partnership for Peace Program and has actively engaged most of its neighbors and other regional actors to build stable foundations for future European security arrangements.
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/2875.htm   (4742 words)

  
 Poland, Poland Chronicle :: Travel to Poland :: Poland Journey :: Poland Travel Guide
Poland is named after the Polane, a Slavic tribe that lived more than a thousand years ago in what is now Poland.
Poland's written history begins with the reign of Mieszko I, who accepted Christianity for himself and his kingdom in AD 966.
Wolves and brown bears survive in the higher mountains, and elk, deer, and mouflon -wild sheep are fairly numerous in the lake districts.
poland.europe-chronicle.com   (2025 words)

  
 origins
The history of Poland began in the middle of the first millenium when different Slavic tribes came to what would become Polish territory and settled there permanently, in the deltas of two large rivers the Vistula and the Warta.
By accepting Christianity, Poland became an equal partner in contacts with the German Empire (earlier the Germans had tried to conquer the Polish tribes, giving the reason that Poles were pagan) and in dealings with other countries.
Mieszko organized a Church structure in Poland and established in 968 the first bishopric in Poznan, which was answerable to the Vatican alone.
www.insidepoland.pl /htmls/origins.html   (905 words)

  
 The Virtual Jewish History Tour - Poland
Poland was home to the largest Jewish population in Europe and served as the center for Jewish culture.
Immigrants flocked to Poland from Bohemia-Moravia, Germany, Italy, Spain and colonies in the Crimea.
According to Hasidic tradition, in southeast Poland, in the region of Podolia, Israel ben Eliezer Ba’al Shem Tov (otherwise known as the Ba’al Shem Tov or Besht) was born in 1699.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/vjw/Poland.html   (4060 words)

  
 Mieszko I and Boles³aw Chrobry (Boleslaus the Brave)
The reigns of Mieszko I (?-992) and his son Boles³aw Chrobry (Boleslaus the Brave), mark the period when the Polish tribes were brought together in a united and internally well-knit realm which made an active contribution to European politics.
The wars skilfully conducted by Mieszko and Boleslaus earned Poland not only new territories (the Strongholds of Czerwieñ and, temporarily, Moravia and Lusatia), but also the reputation of a power to be reckoned with even by the Holy Roman Emperor.
The major success of early Piastian foreign policy was the Congress of Gniezno (1000), during which the Emperor Otto III recognised Boleslaus as the principal ally for his plan to unite Europe under the imperial rule, and approved the erection of an independent Polish metropolitan see, as well as Boleslaus' subsequent coronation (1025).
poland.gov.pl /Mieszko,I,and,Boleslaw,Chrobry,(Boleslaus,the,Brave),326.html   (318 words)

  
 History of the Jews in Poland   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Earlier, Mieszko III, the prince of Great Poland between 1138 and 1202 and the ruler of all Poland in 1173-77 and 1198-1202, employed Jews in his mint as engravers of dies and technical supervisors of all workers.
Towards the end of the 16th century the flood of immigration abated and new communities were founded generally as a result of the movement of the population from the crowded districts to new quarters.
The legal position of the Jews was still regulated by royal and princely privileges and Sejm statutes, with the difference that in 1539 Polish Jews from private towns and villages became subordinated to the judiciary and administration of the owners.
members.core.com /~mikerose/history.html   (6801 words)

  
 The Dispatch - Serving the Lexington, NC - News   (Site not responding. Last check: )
At this battle, recorded as Schlacht bei Zehden Battle of Cedynia, duke Mieszko I of Poland and his brother, recorded in chronicles as Czcibor defeated Hodo I, the German margrave of the Northern March and Lusatia.
This was one of Mieszko's and his son Boleslaw I's numerous battles, that they took up in their conquests and conquest attempts in several neighboring countries, soon after they received positions as dukes.
Thus Mieszko of the Polans gained access for the first time in 972 to the Oder River going north into the Baltic Sea and to some parts of the land, later called Pomerania.
www.the-dispatch.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Cedynia   (440 words)

  
 Knowledge Products Audiobooks - Poland
The breakdown of Europe's Eastern Bloc proves that the map of Europe cannot be redrawn merely to serve political ends.
Poland is at height of Golden Age (ca 1580-1700); largest state in Europe.
Hitler renounces pact with Poland (1939), agrees with Russia to partition Poland (Fourth Partition).
www.audioclassics.net /html/hot_files/poland.cfm   (367 words)

  
 Kievan Rus Database (Poland)
Cherven-Russia was a borderland between Poland and Russia in Yaroslav's time, in the northwestern part of Volynia and in Galicia.
Poland supported Izyaslav Yaroslavich when he was ousted from Kiev.
Either Poland, which showed a clear tendency to expand eastwards, would assimilate the Eastern Slav territory of Galich, Volyn and the Drevlyane, or Rus would succeed in gathering around her all the Eastern Slav lands and retain them.
members.aol.com /ingigerthr/Poland.html   (318 words)

  
 LNT Poland - Jews in Poland
This was the period when the Crusades and the Holy Inquisition led to the persecutions of Jews in the countries of Western Europe and their subsequent wandering eastwards in search for asylum.
They found the protection and tolerance they sought in Poland, a country which was, at that time, poorly developed and in need of merchants and craftsmen.
Poland became host over time to the largest concentration of Jews in Europe and the most potent hub for Jewish culture as well.
cyberroad.com /poland/jews.html   (1047 words)

  
 Notes on Poland -- Part 2
Mieszko II is friendly, or actually allied to all three.
Mieszko fights for a month and flees to Bohemia (Oldrich is angry with Conrad).
A Poland united under a strong leader could have supplanted the Holy Roman Empire as the dominant force in Europe, or possibly become the center of the Empire.
slavic.freeservers.com /Poland2.html   (2686 words)

  
 About Poland - Hotels Poland QuoVadis.com - Online Booking Center
Poland lies between the rivers Bug and Oder on one hand, and the Carpathian and Sudeten mountains and the Baltic Sea on the other.
In 1226 the Knights occupied most of Poland and it was not until 1410, a date that is still remembered today, that the Poles finally defeated them in the Battle of Grunwald.
Currently, in Poland there are nearly a hundred very well preserved (or restored) castles, palaces and manor houses running hotel, dining and even conference services, most of which meet European standards and provide safe and unforgettable accommodation.
www.quovadis.com /about/poland.html   (1178 words)

  
 WHKMLA : History of Poland - Christianization
Mieszko, in order to counterbalance the Emperor's influence, around 990 symbolically made Poland a present to Saint Peter (the pope).
The baptism of Mieszko I. in 966 was politically motivated, removing the claim of extending christianity from the expanding German Empire.
The presentation of Poland to Saint Peter by Mieszko ca.990 was not merely symbolic, as the country for centuries was to pay St.
www.zum.de /whkmla/region/eceurope/christpol.html   (599 words)

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