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Topic: Miltiades


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In the News (Tue 18 Jun 19)

  
  MILTIADES - LoveToKnow Article on MILTIADES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Miltiades was, according to Herodotus, expelled by Scythian invaders, but was brought back by the Doloncians, and subsequently captured Lemnos and Imbros for Athens from the so-called Pelasgian inhabitants, who were Persian dependents.
If Miltiades really recommended the destruction of the bridge, we may infer that the Herodotean story of his flight before the Scythians is a misunderstanding of the fact that his residence in Chersonese after the Scythian invasion was insecure and not continuous.
On the approach of the Persians Miltiades was made one of the ten Athenian generals, and it was on his advice that the polemarch Callimachus decided to give battle at Marathon (q.v.).
www.1911encyclopedia.org /M/MI/MILTIADES.htm   (772 words)

  
 Miltiades - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Miltiades the Elder was a member of an immensely wealthy Athenian noble family, the Philaids.
However, the revolt collapsed in 494 BC and in 492 BC Miltiades fled to Athens to escape a retaliatory Persian invasion.
Miltiades suffered a bad leg wound during the campaign and was incapacitated by it.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Miltiades   (528 words)

  
 Miltiades The Younger   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Miltiades' family must have been extraordinarily wealthy; his father, Cimon, three times won the chariot races at the Olympic Games, while his uncle, after whom he was named, was the founder of an Athenian semi-independent principality in the Thracian Chersonese (now the Gallipoli Peninsula).
Miltiades the Elder died childless and arranged for his stepbrother's sons to inherit the dominions he had conquered.
Miltiades, dying of gangrene from a leg wound suffered in a mishap, was fined 50 talents, although the death penalty had been demanded.
www.omhros.gr /Kat/History/Greek/Gn/Miltiades.htm   (886 words)

  
 Pope Miltiades - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Miltiades, or Melchiades (other forms of the name being Meltiades, Melciades, Milciades, and Miltides) was Pope from July 10, 310 or 311 to January 10 or 11, 314.
The Edicts of Toleration, known as the "Edict of Milan" [1] of Galerius and of Constantine and Licinius were published during his pontificate.
Constantine presented the pope with the Lateran Palace which became the papal residence and seat of Christian governance; there was held the Lateran Synod in Rome (313) at which Caecilianus was acquitted of the charges brought against him, and Donatus condemned as a heretic.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pope_Miltiades   (239 words)

  
 miltiades
Miltiades, noted general and victor of the Battle of Marathon (490), was the son of Cimon.
Miltiades is said to have argued for the destruction of the bridge, but the Greeks were won over by Histiaeus of Miletus, and the bridge was left intact, thus allowing Darius to return safely to Persia.
Miltiades was brought back to the Chersonese by its inhabitants sometime before 499 Perhaps during this period Miltiades divorced the daughter of Hippias, who had become a political liability with that tyrant's fall in 510, and married the Thracian princess, Hegesipyle, daughter of Olorus; she was the mother of Cimon.
sandros.freeservers.com /miltiades.htm   (814 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Pope St. Miltiades
Miltiades caused the remains of his predecessor, Eusebius, to be brought back from Sicily to Rome, and had them interred in a crypt in the Catacombs of St. Callistus.
In 313 the Donatists (q.v.) came to Constantine with a request to nominate bishops from Gaul as judges in the controversy of the African episcopate regarding the consecration in Carthage of the two bishops, Cæcilian and Majorinus.
In the biography of Miltiades, in the "Liber Pontificalis", it is stated that at the time Manichæans were found in Rome; this was quite possible as Manichæism began to be spread in the West in the fourth century.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/10318a.htm   (898 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 1088 (v. 2)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
When the Athenians advanced against the Persians, Miltiades by his arguments induced the polemarch Callimachus to give the casting vote in favour of risking a battle with the enemy, the opinions of the ten generals being equally divided.
Miltiades waited till his turn came, and then drew his army up in battle array on the ever memorable field of Marathon.
MILTIADES, joint commander of the Pelopon- nesian fleet with Lysander and Philochares at the close of the Peloponnesian war.
ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/2196.html   (965 words)

  
 Miltiades
When Miltiades, the son of Cimon, was born, the city of Athens was ruled by a tyrant named Pisistratus.
Later traditions presented Miltiades as an opponent of the tyrant and his son Hippias, but this is probably not the whole truth, because we know from an inscription that he occupied the office of archont in 524/523, which suggests that he cooperated with the ruling family.
In c.520, Miltiades inherited the Chersonese, the peninsula north of Troy and west of the Hellespont.
www.livius.org /mi-mn/miltiades/miltiades.html   (1403 words)

  
 History of Iran: The Persian Wars
Miltiades' eldest son was captured by the Phoenicians who brought him to the Persians, but they treated this prisoner with great honor and gave him a Persian wife (VI 41).
Miltiades followed the strategy recommended by the best German generals when the Allies were planning their landing in France: one should try to stop the Allies within the first two kilometers from the shore or not try at all.
The Persian strategy and that of Miltiades resulted in a stalemate because the Persians could not move beyond Marathon as they had planned, being unable to use the cavalry on rocky ground, while the Greeks, because of the Persian cavalry, could not attack the Persians that were encamped on the shore of the plain.
www.iranchamber.com /history/articles/persian_wars4.php   (9668 words)

  
 Miltiades - Wikipedia
Miltiades was een Atheens staatsman en veldheer die leefde van ca.
In deze functie behaalde hij de beroemde overwinning op het Perzische invasieleger in de Slag bij Marathon.
Een jaar later leidde Miltiades een strafexpeditie tegen de eilandstaten in de Egeïsche Zee, die de zijde van Perzië hadden gekozen.
nl.wikipedia.org /wiki/Miltiades   (285 words)

  
 Station Information - Miltiades
Miltiades was an aristocrat from a major family of Athens who died around 488 BC.
While leading a military expedition to the Crimean peninsula (a major source of grain for the Athenians) he married Hegesipyle, the daughter of Olorus the King of Thrace.
Miltiades was elected one of the 10 generals (strategoi) for 490/489, and is often credited with the tactics that defeated the Persians in the Battle of Marathon that year.
www.stationinformation.com /encyclopedia/m/mi/miltiades.html   (92 words)

  
 Herodotus: Book Six
Captured in battle by the Lampsacenes, Miltiades was rescued by the intervention of Croesus of Lydia (37).
Miltiades, riding high at Athens after Marathon, is entrusted by Athens with 70 ships and an army, though he does not say for what purpose he will use them, but only that he will enrich the city (132).
Miltiades later sailed there from the Chersonese in one day and claimed the oracle had been fulfilled (since it was Athenian territory); the Lemnians agreed after being besieged, and so Miltiades took Lemnos for Athens (140).
academic.reed.edu /humanities/Hum110/Hdt/Hdt6.html   (3169 words)

  
 Athenian Political Art from the fifth and fourth centuries BCE: Images of Historical Individuals
Of the four portraits of Miltiades noted in ancient written sources, the posthumous ones to which Demosthenes referred are most likely that seen in the Prytaneion and/or that seen in the Theater of Dionysos.
A portrait of Miltiades and one of Themistocles shown with it in the Prytaneion at Athens later had their names changed to those of a Roman and a Thracian, according to Pausanias (Paus.
Miltiades was also said to have been paired with Themistocles in the Theater of Dionysos at Athens, where the two were shown with Persian prisoners (Sch.
www.stoa.org /projects/demos/article_portraits?section=Miltiades&greekEncoding=UnicodeC   (529 words)

  
 Miltiades
Miltiades was able to claim the Chersonese was now his home, and thus fill his end of his bargain by sailing to Lemnos from home with the north wind.
Miltiades' eldest son, Metiochos (we know his mother was not Hegesipyle, but we don't know who she was), was captured by the Persians, but Darius treated him with respect, giving him a Persian wife and lands and houses.
Miltiades persuaded them to leave the city and prepare to fight at Marathon, arguing that this would boost their own morale and decrease the enemy’s.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/18302/105706   (553 words)

  
 ST. MILTIADES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Though St. Miltiades ruled the Church for only three years, he was to witness one of history's turning points--the coming of Constantine and the end of an era, the era of persecution.
Both position and problems were quickly given emphasis by a gathering of bishops held by Pope Miltiades in the Lateran Palace.
St. Miltiades was buried in the Cemetery of Calixtus.
www.cfpeople.org /Books/Pope/POPEp32.htm   (518 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: The Story of the Greeks by H. A. Guerber
Miltiades was, as we have seen, the idol of the Athenian people after his victory at Marathon.
Miltiades was not rich enough to raise this large sum of money, so he died in prison.
Miltiades, who had been the idol of the people, was now buried hurriedly and in secret, because the ungrateful Athenians had forgotten all the good he had done them, and remembered only his faults.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=guerber&book=greeks&story=disgrace   (570 words)

  
 The Moron's Almanac
Miltiades commanded an army composed of Athenians and Plataeans, with the anticipated support of the Spartans, and faced down an invading Persian force of vastly superior numbers.
In defiance of traditional Athenian military strategy, Miltiades decided to attack the Persians in spite of their overwhelming force, rather than entrench his forces and await the Persian offensive.
Miltiades took advantage of the uneven terrain at Marathon, which prevented the Persians from making effective use of their cavalry, and limited the mobility of their infantry.
www.justmorons.com /archive/v03n07.html   (1101 words)

  
 Miltiades biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
MILTIADES - A famous Athenian general, son of Cimon (q.v.).
Being unable to do this, he was thrown into prison, where he died of an injury received at Paros.
The biography of this Miltiades by Cornelius Nepoa (q.v.) is extant.
www.dromo.info /miltiadesbio.htm   (226 words)

  
 Archaic Period-Politics
Militades was first elected archon at Athens in 524 B.C. On the death of his brother Stesagoras, he became tyrant of the Chersonese and married the Thracian chief Olorus' daughter.
In the course of Darius' campaign against the Scythians, Miltiades planned the destruction of the Persians' bridge over the Danube, so as to cut off Darius' army and assist the revolt of the Ionian cities.
It was Miltiades' plan that led to the Hellenes' victory.
www.fhw.gr /chronos/04/en/politics/350exw_proso.html   (235 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Miltiades (Ancient History, Greece, Biography) - Encyclopedia
His experience and ability made him a powerful figure and he was elected to the board of generals to oppose the impending Persian invasion (see Persian Wars).
Perhaps the chief glory of Miltiades was that he brought his army, which had been fighting all day, in a 20-mi (32-km) race back to Athens; in the morning when the Persian fleet arrived off Athens, Miltiades and his army were ready.
After the battle Miltiades was given a fleet.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/M/Miltiade.html   (321 words)

  
 Cornelius Nepos: Lives of Eminent Commanders (1886) pp. 305-450
Miltiades, having no time for delay, directed his course to the quarter to which he was bound, and arrived at the Chersonese.
In Miltiades, however, there was both the greatest philanthropy and a wonderful affability, so that there was no person so humble as not to have free access to him; he had also the greatest influence among all the states of Greece, with a noble name, and reputation for military achievements.
CIMON, the son of Miltiades, an Athenian, experienced a very unhappy entrance on manhood; for as his father had been unable to pay to the people the fine imposed upon him, and had consequently died in the public gaol, Cimon was kept in prison, nor could he, by the Athenian laws,
www.tertullian.org /fathers/nepos.htm   (15127 words)

  
 the Dremora Team
Miltiades: 28 year old Dutch guy who answered the call to grant a playable version of a Dremora (male and female) to the community and became the team leader.
Was recruited by Miltiades to do the body textures for version 1.0.
We have also had much help from the users of the Elder Scrolls Forums and their input, suggestions, ideas and attempts to have us committed to a mental asylum have been a great help to us.
www.angelfire.com /magic/dremora/team.htm   (400 words)

  
 Leaders and Battles: Miltiades,
Miltiades succeeded his uncle as ruler of an Athenian dependency in the Gallipoli Pennisula.
Miltiades raced his infantry back to Athens in time to defend it against the arriving Persian fleet.
By this time, Miltiades earned a fleet of 70 ships and sailed to retake the Aegean Sea.
www.lbdb.com /TMDisplayLeader.cfm?PID=5634   (209 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: Famous Men of Greece by John H. Haaren and A. B. Poland
Miltiades guessed what it meant and marched back to Athens immediately.
The town of Paros was not captured, and Miltiades was obliged to give up the siege and return to Athens.
After the death of Miltiades the Athenians were sorry for their harshness toward him.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=haaren&book=greece&story=miltiades   (902 words)

  
 Ship Modelers Association - Famous Ships
MILTIADES was 100 tons larger than the PATRIARCH, Thompson’s first iron ship, and bore little resemblance to the later.
Launched in 1871, MILTIADES was more powerful and faster off the wind, although she was very wet when "running heavy".
MILTIADES had only a raised quarter-deck which allowed a main-rail the entire length of the ship.
www.ship-modelers-assn.org /fam9712.htm   (936 words)

  
 Miltiades the Younger * People, Places, & Things * Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant
The son of Kimon (Cimon) and the third member of his family to rule the Khersonese (Chersonese) as tyrant.
Miltiades was the youngest of two sons and when his brother, Stesagoras, was murdered he became the tyrant of the Khersonese; he was living in the city of Athens (circa 495 BCE) where his father, Kimon, was a prominent citizen as well as a renowned chariot racer.
Unbeknownst to Miltiades, the sons of the tyrant, Pisistratus, murdered his father and sent Miltiades to the Khersonese to assume the throne after the death of his older brother, Stesagoras, in order to have him away from Athens.
www.messagenet.com /myths/ppt/Miltiades_the_Younger_1.html   (317 words)

  
 Footnotes
This Miltiades is known to us from three sources: from the present chapter, from the Roman work quoted by Eusebius in chap.
That Miltiades was widely known at the end of the second century is clear from the notices of him by an Asiatic, a Roman, and a Carthaginian writer.
In confirmation of the supposition that Eusebius was mistaken in making Miltiades the author of an anti-Montanistic work may be urged the fact that Tertullian speaks of Miltiades with respect, and ranks him with the greatest Fathers of the second century.
www.bible.ca /history/fathers/NPNF2-01/footnote/fn32.htm   (4042 words)

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