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Topic: Mineraloid


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In the News (Mon 22 Jul 19)

  
  Opal
Opal is considered a mineraloid and has no crystal structure.
Opal usually is formed as a mineraloid gel that is created at very low temperatures.
This mineraloid gel is usually created at temperatures less than 200 degrees Celsius and can occur in fissures of many types of rock.
www.gemstoneeducation.com /Opal_2.htm   (530 words)

  
  Mineraloid   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
A mineraloid is a mineral-like substance that does not demonstrate crystallinity.
Pearls, considered by some to be a mineral because of the presence of calcium carbonate crystals within their structure, would be better considered a mineraloid because the crystals are bonded by an organic material and there is no definite proportion of the components.
Pearl, often considered a mineral due to crystal components, but then not a mineral due to organic origin, probably should be a mineraloid.
www.pastywhitegirl.com /search/Mineraloid   (180 words)

  
  Top Literature - Mineraloid
A mineraloid is a mineral-like substance that does not demonstrate crystallinity.
Mineraloids possess chemical compositions that vary beyond the generally accepted ranges for specific minerals.
Pearls, considered by some to be a mineral because of the presence of calcium carbonate crystals within their structure, would be better considered a mineraloid because the crystals are bonded by an organic material and there is no definite proportion of the components.
encyclopedia.topliterature.com /?title=Mineraloid   (171 words)

  
 mineraloid | English | Dictionary & Translation by Babylon
A mineraloid is a mineral-like substance that does not demonstrate crystallinity.
Mineraloids possess chemical compositions that vary beyond the generally accepted ranges for specific minerals.
Pearls, considered by some to be a mineral because of the presence of calcium carbonate crystals within their structure, would be better considered a mineraloid because the crystals are bonded by an organic material and there is no definite proportion of the components.
www.babylon.com /definition/mineraloid   (135 words)

  
 Chrysocolla
Chrysocolla is not as common as other minerals and thus not usually mined as a rare mineral.
In fact, many mineralogists do not specifically categorize it as a mineral, but as a mineraloid because it doesn’t have a true crystalline structure.
Chrysocolla is found in many areas of the world, most notably the Czech Republic, Israel, Cornwall England, Congo and in certain states in America including Utah, Arizona, Pennsylvania and New Mexico.
www.gemstoneeducation.com /Chrysocolla.htm   (518 words)

  
 Mineraloid information - Search.com
Opal is another mineraloid due to its non-crystal nature.
Pearls, considered by some to be a mineral due to the presence of calcium carbonate crystals within their structure, would be better considered a mineraloid because the crystals are bonded by an organic material and there is no definite proportion of the components.
A very common mineraloid is limonite a mixture of hydrated iron oxides.
domainhelp.search.com /reference/Mineraloid   (170 words)

  
 Mineraloid at AllExperts
Opal is another mineraloid due to its non-crystal nature.
Pearls, considered by some to be a mineral due to the presence of calcium carbonate crystals within their structure, would be better considered a mineraloid because the crystals are bonded by an organic material and there is no definite proportion of the components.
A very common mineraloid is limonite a mixture of hydrated iron oxides.
en.allexperts.com /e/m/mi/mineraloid.htm   (209 words)

  
 Mineraloid   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Opal is another mineraloid due to its non-crystal nature.
Pearls, considered by some to be a mineral due to the presence of calcium carbonate crystals within their structure, would be better considered a mineraloid because the crystals are bonded by an organic material and there is no definite proportion of the components.
It is licensed under the GNU free documentation license.
www.ufaqs.com /wiki/en/mi/Mineraloid.htm   (129 words)

  
 Opal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The stone size is 18 by 15 mm (0.7 by 0.6 inches).
The mineraloid opal is amorphous hydrated silica, the water content sometimes being as high as 20%.
Opal is a mineraloid gel which is deposited at relatively low temperature and may occur in the fissures of almost any kind of rock, being most commonly found in ironstone, sandstone, and basalt.
www.teachtime.com /en/wikipedia/o/op/opal.html   (433 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Mineraloid
Mineraloids possess chemical compositions that vary beyond the generally accepted ranges for specific minerals.
Opal is another mineraloid because of its non-crystal nature.
List of minerals Mineraloids are listed alphabetically after minerals.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Mineraloid   (166 words)

  
 CYAN RIFT :: Gemstone Descriptions :: Gemstone jewelry information, properties, folklore, birthstones, and necklace ...
Most of the time it is amorphous meaning that it does not have a coherent crystalline structure, and in its pure form is soft and fragile and therefore not appropriate for use in jewelry.
In healing folklore it is calming, especially in instinctual and survival based issues.
{general} - Technically a mineraloid and not a mineral because it does not have a crystalline structure, opal is composed of tiny balls of silica and water that interact with light to produce the most amazing colors.
www.cyanrift.com /gem_descrip.htm   (2313 words)

  
 The "mineral" mercury
(Amorphous) Since Mercury is a liquid, it lacks a crystal structure and is thus not really a mineral but a mineraloid.
One of the scientifically accepted standards defining a mineral is that a mineral must have a crystal structure, which Mercury lacks.
For this reason, Mercury -- as well as other amorphous types that fall under the definition of a mineraloid -- is mentioned in the mineral section of this guide
www.egyptian.net /~grafton/rockcoll/group6/page12.htm   (536 words)

  
 Snowflake Obsidian - Gemstone Information
Snowflake Obsidian is supposed to address all of these same things but in a gentler manner than regular dark Obsidian.
Mineraloids are a class of non-minerals that are associated with and often mistaken for minerals.
Mineraloids are naturally occurring substances and some are considered gemstones.
www.distantsunartwork.com /home/gemstones/snowflake_obsidian_semi-precious_gemstone.htm   (833 words)

  
 Fossils, Shells and Amber
According to theorists, ambers ability to produce static electricity, was first discovered by the ancient philosopher and scientist Thales, at about 600 BC.
Although often grouped with other mineral gemstones, amber is in fact classed as a mineraloid – an informal category for specimens that are often classed as minerals.
These specimens are said to be amorphous, which means that they have no recognized crystal structure.
www.crystals.co.za /shop/other/index.htm   (142 words)

  
 Mineraloid - Wikinfo   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
A mineraloid is a mineral-like substance that does not demonstrate crystallinity.
Mineraloids possess chemical compositions that lie outside the generally accepted ranges for specific minerals.
This page was last modified 20:34, 17 July 2004.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Mineraloid   (361 words)

  
 Collecting Minerals - Introduction
These few exceptions are often known as mineraloids.
A mineraloid is a mineral that does not meet all the requirements of a being a mineral.
Amber is good example of a mineraloid because it is organic.
www.emporia.edu /earthsci/amber/go336/laird/mineral1.html   (651 words)

  
 A mineraloid is a mineral mineral like substance that does not...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
A mineraloid is a mineral mineral like substance that does not...
A mineraloid is a mineral mineral-like substance that does not demonstrate crystallinity.
A copy of the license is included in the section entitled
www.biodatabase.de /mineraloid   (101 words)

  
 Gems & Jewelry-2
The mineraloid opal is made up of hydrated silica - SiO2.n(H2O), a hardened gel of silica containing up to 30% (but usually 5-10%) water.
Opal is considered a mineraloid because it does not have a crystalline structure; but it can possess structure nonetheless.
Gem grade iolite is found primarily in Sri Lanka, India, Madagascar and Burma.
home.pacifier.com /~shm/Gems/jewelry2.html   (1758 words)

  
 Mineraloid - LocalColorArt.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Looking For mineraloid - Find mineraloid and more at Lycos Search.
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www.localcolorart.com /encyclopedia/Mineraloid   (298 words)

  
 MINERALOID Articles A mineraloid is a mineral-like subs
MINERALOID Articles A mineraloid is a mineral-like subs
Showing 1 to 0 of 0 Articles matching 'Mineraloid' in related articles.
Some pages may contain portions of text relating to certain topics obtained from wikipedia.org under the GNU FDL license
www.amazines.com /Mineraloid_related.html   (349 words)

  
 Gems & Jewelry-2
The mineraloid opal is made up of hydrated silica - SiO2.n(H2O), a hardened gel of silica containing up to 30% (but usually 5-10%) water.
Opal is considered a mineraloid because it does not have a crystalline structure; but it can possess structure nonetheless.
Gem grade iolite is found primarily in Sri Lanka, India, Madagascar and Burma.
www.pacifier.com /~shm/Gems/jewelry2.html   (1758 words)

  
 What is Obsidian?
Obsidian is not really a mineral or a rock, because it does not contain crystalline structures.
A mineraloid is a mineral-like substance that lacks crystal structures.
Other examples of mineraloids include opals and pearls.
www.wisegeek.com /what-is-obsidian.htm   (414 words)

  
 October Birthstone-Gemstone Jewelry-birthstone list birthstonesource.com
Although extremely rare up to the mid 19th century a large discovery of Opal in Australia has made them one of the most popular gemstones.
Opals are not a true mineral, but a mineraloid gel composed of hydrated silicon dioxide.
Opals are found a multitude of varieties and colors.
www.birthstonesource.com /october-birthstone.html   (356 words)

  
 Chrysocolla Stone,Chrysocolla Gemstone,Chrysocolla Gem Stone,Chrysocolla Minerals,Chrysocolla Suppliers,Chrysocolla ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Chrysocolla, the gemstone which provides unique color, blue-green, in the mineral world.
It is, in fact, an appropriate mineraloid than a true mineral.
Mostly, it is amorphous, not having a coherent crystalline structure.
www.mineralszone.com /gemstones/chrysocolla.html   (161 words)

  
 project sa nat sci « Zhu's whatever   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Opal has been a popular gem for many centuries and has a very interesting structure.
Opal is considered a mineraloid because this structure is not truly crystalline.
For this reason, Opal -- as well as other amorphous types that fall under the definition of a mineraloid -- is mentioned in the mineral section of this guide.
rhennami.blog.com /1108954   (3126 words)

  
 Gemstone Opal
General Category Mineraloid Chemical formula Hydrated silica.SiO 2 · n H 2 O Identification Colour White, fl, red, orange, most of the full spectrum, colorless, iridescent.
Specific gravity 2.1 - 2.3 Major varieties Black opal, white opal, water opal, fire opal, potch.
The mineraloid opal is amorphous SiO 2 · n H 2 O; hydrated silicon dioxide, the water content sometimesbeing as high as 20%.
www.altvetmed.com /face/27703-gemstone-opal.html   (775 words)

  
 Opal - MalibuMountainWiki
The mineraloid opal is amorphous SiO2·nH2O; hydrated silicon dioxide, the water content sometimes being as high as 20%.
Opal ranges from colorless through white, milky blue, gray, red, yellow, green, brown and fl.
This page was last modified 20:58, 16 August 2006.
www.malibumountaingallery.com /wiki/index.php?title=Opal&printable=yes   (723 words)

  
 Mineralogy 101: Crystals
Sometimes minerals will form that do not have an organized internal structure and are considered amorphous.
Amorphous substances that occur naturally are called mineraloids, the best known being opal.
Crystals can form in one of three methods, either from a solution, melts, or vapors.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/everyday_geology/88344   (538 words)

  
 Mineraloid   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
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www.guideofpills.com /Mineraloid.html   (362 words)

  
 Diamond Jewelry Ring Gems Gold -, necklace, pearls, bracelet, wedding, anniversary, watch, design, white, custom, ...
Opal ranges from colorless through white, milky blue, gray, red, yellow, green, brown and fl.
Opal is a mineraloid gel which is deposited at relatively low temperature and may occur in the fissures of almost any kind of rock, being most commonly found with limonite, sandstone, rhyolite, and basalt.
Aquamarine a gemstone-quality transparent variety of beryl, having a delicate blue or turquoise color, suggestive of the tint of seawater.
www.diamonds-diamonds-diamonds-diamonds.com   (997 words)

  
 mineraloid - Definitions from Dictionary.com
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2006.
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dictionary.reference.com /browse/mineraloid   (58 words)

  
 Definition of mineraloid - Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
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Learn more about "mineraloid " and related topics at Britannica.com
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