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Topic: Mishnah


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In the News (Thu 18 Apr 19)

  
  JewishEncyclopedia.com - MISHNAH
It is, on the contrary, a collection which includes almost the entire material of the oral doctrine as developed from the period of the earliest halakic exegesis down to that of the fixed and crystallized halakot of the early third century.
This first collection of the Mishnah and its separation from the Midrash were intended, on the one hand, to reduce the traditional Halakah to a shorter form, and, on the other, to fix the disputed halakot as such; of these disputed halakot there were then but few.
This earliest Mishnah was intended to afford the teachers both a norm for their decisions and a text-book for their classes and discourses, and thus to preserve the uniformity of teaching.
www.jewishencyclopedia.com /view.jsp?artid=660&letter=M&search=mishnah   (8090 words)

  
  Mishnah
Mishnah, a Hebrew term meaning "repetition" or "study," is the name given to the oldest postbiblical codification of Jewish Oral Law.
The Mishnah, the first part of the Talmud, is a codification of the oral law of the Old Testament and of the political and civil laws of the Jews.
The Mishnah presents only a codification of laws; it is followed by the Gemara, or second part of the Talmud, consisting of an elaborate commentary on the Mishnah.
mb-soft.com /believe/txo/mishnah.htm   (481 words)

  
  Mishnah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Mishnah was redacted around the year 200 BCE by Judah haNasi ("Judah the Prince").
Nearly all of the Mishnah is written in Mishnaic Hebrew, except for a few verses, which are written in Aramaic.
Mishnah of the Daf - a new Mishnah study cycle that parallels the progress of the Daf Yomi.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mishnah   (2640 words)

  
 Mishnah
In some contexts "Mishnah" is contrasted with "Midrash." The latter term denotes Rabbinic teachings that are attached to the text of the Bible, whereas the former term refers to teachings that are organized or formulated independently of Scipture.
The Jewish sages whose statements are quoted in the Mishnah are known as Tanna'im (singular: "Tanna"), derived from the Aramaic root related to the Hebrew "ShNH".
The Mishnah form lent itself most effectively to traditions that were not derived from Scripture or, more commonly, to the unfolding of legal principles whose Biblical roots had been so elaborated that they could be discussed adequately without having to return to their exegetical origins.
www.ucalgary.ca /~elsegal/TalmudMap/Mishnah.html   (1566 words)

  
 Mishnah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Mishnah was redacted around the year 200 CE by Judah haNasi (Judah the Prince).
The Rabbinic sages whose views are recorded in the Mishnah are called Tannaim, the plural of Tanna; Tanna is an Aramaic term for the Hebrew word shana, which also is the root-word of Mishnah.
Mishnah of the Daf (http://www.mishnaofthedaf.org/mishna.php) - a new Mishnah study cycle that parallels the progress of the Daf Yomi.
www.clarksdale.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Mishnah   (2231 words)

  
 Mishnah
In some contexts "Mishnah" is contrasted with "Midrash." The latter term denotes Rabbinic teachings that are attached to the text of the Bible, whereas the former term refers to teachings that are organized or formulated independently of Scipture.
The Mishnah form lent itself most effectively to traditions that were not derived from Scripture or, more commonly, to the unfolding of legal principles whose Biblical roots had been so elaborated that they could be discussed adequately without having to return to their exegetical origins.
Although most of the Mishnah is made up of legal rulings and disputes, there are several other literary types included in it, including midrashic segments (i.e., Biblical passages accompanied by their Rabbinic interpretations), anecdotal precedents, extensive narrative descriptions of rituals and procedures (especially of Temple ceremonies), and more.
www.acs.ucalgary.ca /~elsegal/TalmudMap/Mishnah.html   (1375 words)

  
 Mishnah - Torah/Bible learning, for the Jewish Neshomah/soul
It is customary to learn portions of the Mishnah in memory of the departed, as a source of merit for
One of the principal reasons why the Mishnah is studied in memory of the deceased, the Rabbi's teach is the following: The Hebrew letters of Mishna and of soul (Neshama) consist of the same Hebrew text.
Thus referencing that the soul (Neshama) and the Mishnah are attached on a spiritual level.
www.yahrzeit.org /mishnah.html   (79 words)

  
 Kavvanah (Concentration) for Prayer in the Mishnah and Talmud
Mishnah's rule regarding the interruption of one's recitation of the Prayer of Eighteen is significantly different.
Mishnah elsewhere specifies, "A bridegroom is exempt from the recitation of the Shema` from the first night [after the wedding] until after the Sabbath, if he did not consummate the marriage (M. 2:5)." In this case, M.
To recapitulate, in Mishnah's rules for the recitation of the Prayer and the Shema`, we may distinguish two levels of kavvanah (one for the Shema` and one for the Prayer of Eighteen) and three different forms of disruption of kavvanah (the emotional states of fear, desire, grief).
tzvee.com /kavvanah.html   (4670 words)

  
 MyJewishLearning.com - Texts: Overview: The Mishnah
Although the Talmud (the compendium of the Mishnah and the Gemara, which interprets and comments on the Mishnah) preserves traditions allegedly contemporaneous with the Mishnah that refer to the Bar Kokhba rebellion and defeat, the Mishnah itself ignores these.
In this way, the Mishnah is a document that describes a life of sanctification, in which the rituals of the Temple are adapted for communal participation in a world that has no Temple, which escapes the ups and downs of history.
The Mishnah is divided into six orders; each order is divided into tractates; each tractate is divided into chapters, and each chapter has a number of halakhot.  This structure became the template for all of subsequent Talmudic literature.
www.myjewishlearning.com /texts/talmud/TO_Mishnah_3990.htm   (778 words)

  
 Mishnah from WUJS   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Although the Mishnah isn't arranged as a commentary on the Torah or Tanach in general, much of the Mishnah does explain the Tanach, wherever there seem to be gaps in meaning or narrative.
The Mishnah is the most important collection of the teachings of a group of scholars known as the Tannaim.
By the time the Mishnah was composed, Aramaic dialects had supplanted Hebrew as the language of everyday life, and Hebrew had thus become a language employed only for legal and religious purposes.
www.wujs.org.il /activist/learning/guide/mishnah.shtml   (842 words)

  
 Talmud - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Talmud has two components: the Mishnah, which is the first written compendium of Judaism's Oral Law; and the Gemara, a discussion of the Mishnah (though the terms Talmud and Gemara are often used interchangeably).
While arranged as comments on the Mishnah and related Tannaitic writings, the Gemara often ventures onto other subjects and expounds broadly on the Tanakh.
Maimonides Introduction to the Commentary on the Mishnah (Hebrew Fulltext), transl.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talmud   (5582 words)

  
 Law and Lore: Mishnah, Talmud, and Halakha
As the printing of the Talmud became standardized, the study of the Mishnah itself continued and was also affected by the new possibilities of printing.
The surrounding of the Mishnah text with the Gemara in some medieval manuscripts was paralleled by a surrounding of the Mishnah text with commentaries such as those of Moses Maimonides (d.
In the later volume, printed for independent use, the now-familiar format from the Bomberg Talmud is used: the Mishnah text is surrounded by Maimonides's commentary and by the commentary of Rabbi Samson, one of the Tosafists.
www.library.upenn.edu /exhibits/cajs/exhibit1996/LawandLore.html   (854 words)

  
 USCJ: Mishnah Yomit
Mishnah Yomit, or "the daily mishnah," built on the success of Perek Yomi, which continues to involve Conservative Jews in ongoing Bible study.
Mishnah Yomit -- which seeks to make this rich text accessible and interesting to Conservative Jews of all backgrounds -- familiarizes participants with the Mishnah by asking them to learn one or two mishnayot per day.
Kulp, Mishnah study will prove particularly appealing to those who love to study and debate, since the text is comprised of "arguments" between rabbis, each trying to prove that he is correct.
www.uscj.org /Mishnah_Yomit6189.html   (608 words)

  
 Introduction
A collection of articles on woven-texts in the Torah and the Mishnah should be of interest both to students of the Bible and of ancient literature.
The second source is the Mishnah, the legal compendium written in the third century by Rabbi Judah the Prince, known simply as Rabbi, or in transliteration, Rebbi.
A clear example of the compatibility between certain Kabbalistic principals and the structure of the Mishnah, as described by the Maharal of Prague, can be found in The Art of Writing the Oral Tradition.
chaver.com /Articles/Intro.htm   (1283 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Mishnah   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Mishnah (Hebrew, "Repetition") is the core of rabbinic Judaism's religious texts.
This parallel set of material was originally transmitted orally, and came to be known as the oral law.
Over the next four centuries this law underwent discussion and debate in both of the world's major Jewish communities (in the land of Israel and Babylon), and the commentaries on the Mishnah from both of these communities eventually came to be edited together into compilations known as the Talmud.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Mishnah   (737 words)

  
 Mishnah
The Mishnah is the systemized collection of both the Oral Law of the Old Testament, and of the political and civil laws of Judaism.
The juridical traditions of Mishnah goes back as far as 450 BCE, a period when all material was transmitted orally.
Mishnah is written in Hebrew, but has many words from Aramaic and Greek.
i-cias.com /e.o/mishnah.htm   (225 words)

  
 Jewish Holy Books
A discussion of the Mishnah took place in the academies of Babylonia between the years 200 and 600 CE.
Together, Mishnah and Gemara comprise the Talmud (the written record of what Jews believe is Moses' oral Torah, its meaning, and application).
The Mishnah, as it has come down to us, was written and closed by Judah HaNasi, the leading scholar and religious authority of his generation, around the year 200 CE., thus making it possible to transmit Jewish learning despite a dearth of rabbis and sages in his generation.
www.new-life.net /talmud.htm   (1086 words)

  
 Maharal on Avot archives
Maharal on Avot -- Pereq 1, Mishnah 16-18
Maharal on Avot -- Pereq 2, Mishnah 2-3
Maharal on Avot -- Pereq 2, Mishnah 7 II
www.rjconline.org /maharalarchives.html   (234 words)

  
 A New Approach to Torah and Mishnah
It is based on an original discovery which has been published in peer-reviewed journals and is consistent with traditional Jewish understandings.
Students on all levels have utilized this approach to deepen their understanding and appreciation of the Torah and the Mishnah.
Both the Torah and the Mishnah were constructed as non-linear texts.
www.chaver.com   (149 words)

  
 The First Coming: How the Kingdom of God Became Christianity (Appendix on Rabbinical Literature)
In its final form the Mishnah comprises sixty-three (originally sixty) canonical tractates (along with seven extracanonical ones, which are sometimes printed at the conclusion of the Fourth Seder).
Texts in the Mishnah are usually cited according to the name of the tractate, the chapter, and the paragraph, without the name of the Seder.
Legal opinions that continue and comment on the Mishnah were collected around 300 C.E. into the Tosephta ("supplement"), which, although it cites sources older than the Mishnah and is four times longer, has not achieved the same status as the Mishnah.
infidels.org /library/modern/thomas_sheehan/firstcoming/appendix.html   (1006 words)

  
 Mishnah   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mishnah (Hebrew, teaching) is Jewish oral law and in particular a collection of oral law completed by Judah ha-Nasi.
Originally all oral law was designated as "mishnah" and it was accepted that the mishnah of one tanna was different from that of another.
After Judah ah-Nasi reacted and arranged his six orders of mishnah around the beginning of the sixth century AD it was initially described as "Our Mishnah." The Mishnah is divided into six sedarim, orders, Zeraim (Seeds), Mo'ed (Festivals), Nashim (Women), Nezikim (Damages), Kodashim (Holy Things), and Tohorot (Purities): the Talmuds are based on these sedarim.
www.themystica.com /mystica/articles/m/mishnah.html   (235 words)

  
 The Hebraic Roots Movement
The Mishnah is the early Talmud or the forerunner of the Talmud.
The Babylonian Talmud is a commentary on the Mishnah composed by Babylonian Jewish sages (Ravs) from the early third to the sixth century.
Hebrew scholar, Eliezer Segal, documents that the Babylonian Talmud (T.B.) is a commentary on the Mishnah composed by Babylonian Jewish sages (Ravs) from the early third to the sixth century.
watch.pair.com /HRM.html   (8381 words)

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