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Topic: Mississippi John Hurt


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In the News (Mon 20 Nov 17)

  
  Mississippi John Hurt and the Delta Blues
Mississippi John Hurt's quiet dignity, humor, superb guitar style, and his tender and expressive voice made him the most popular artist of traditional country blues re discovered by the public in the sixties.
John was not a real blues man but was a collector of popular songs who arranged them to entertain his neighbors on Saturday evenings.
John tells some stories during the performance and I highly recommend this CD and it is an absolute must if you enjoy live recordings.
www.mindspring.com /~dennist   (2094 words)

  
  Mississippi John Hurt Biography - AOL Music
Hurt was spotted by a scout for Okeh Records who passed through Avalon in 1927, who was supposed to record Narmour, and was signed to record after a quick audition.
Hurt's dexterity as a guitarist, coupled with his plain-spoken nature, were his apparent undoing, at least as a popular blues artist, at the time.
Hurt got in one more full album, The Immortal Mississippi John Hurt, released posthumously, but even better was the record assembled from his final sessions, Last Sessions, also issued after his death; these songs broke new lyrical ground, and showed Hurt's voice and guitar to be as strong as ever, just months before his death.
music.aol.com /artist/mississippi-john-hurt/379/biography   (850 words)

  
  Mississippi John Hurt
Mississippi John Hurt Influential blues singer and guitarist.
Raised in Avalon, Mississippi, he learnt to play guitar at age 10, and spent much of his youth playing old time music[?] for friends and dances.
In 1963, however, a folk musicologist named Tom Hoskins, inspired by the recordings visited Hurt and encouraged his return to performance on a wider stage.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/mi/Mississippi_John_Hurt.html   (226 words)

  
 The Mudcat Mississippi John Hurt Room
Mississippi John Hurt was born March 8, 1892 in Carroll County, Mississippi.
Hurt earned his meagre living working odd jobs; he worked as a field hand, as a laborer picking cotton or corn, or working cattle.
John Hurt was discovered in his late thirties, perhaps plucking away on the front stoop of the Valley Store in Carroll County.
www.mudcat.org /hurt.cfm   (437 words)

  
 Trail of the Hellhound: Mississippi John Hurt
Born July 3, 1893, in Teoc, Mississippi, Hurt and his family moved in 1895 to Avalon, a town on the edge of Mississippi's hill country.
While Hurt worked mostly outside music as a farmer and laborer, his musical reputation among whites as well as fls led to his first recording session in Memphis in 1928.
Hurt recorded eight sides for the Okeh label, two of which were released and sold well: "Frankie" and "Nobody's Dirty Business." In Memphis for the same recording session was St. Louis guitarist/pianist Lonnie Johnson, and Hurt later recalled that Blind Lemon Jefferson and Bessie Smith were also in town.
www.nps.gov /history/delta/blues/people/msjohn_hurt.htm   (554 words)

  
 WGBH | Mississippi John Hurt   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
John's sound was certainly far different than Smith's and had a softer quality to it in comparison to his recording contemporaries Charley Patton, Son House and Blind Lemon Jefferson.
For 30 years, John Hurt toiled on the farms of Avalon, Mississippi where he continued to play music at dances and parties as a way to make money on the side.
It just so happened that John was still living in Avalon, Mississippi, and was convinced to return to the professional stage as a musician who had deep roots in the country blues of an era past.
www.wgbh.org /article?item_id=2929600   (378 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt; Aaron's Site
Hurt's playing is sheer musical perfection, with a keen sense of chord melody structure to make his bouncy, rhythmic execution of it sound both elegant and driving.
Mississippi John's voice -- he was 36 at the time of these recordings -- was already a warm and friendly one, imbued with the laidback wistfulness that would earmark his rediscovery recordings half a lifetime later.
Mississippi John Hurt would go on to re-record this material for other labels in the 60s with fine results, but these are the originals and the ones that much of his justifiable reputation rests on.
www.stkate.edu /~lis753/winter04/lundholm/MJH/discography.html   (1433 words)

  
 MississippiJohnHurt   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
John Hurt was born in Teoc, Mississippi in 1892.
Hurt taught himself to play, and when asked how he came upon such a unique style, he said he played “the way I thought the guitar should sound.” Using bare fingers, Hurt picked out his tunes with a syncopated technique all his own.
Hurt then returned home, and although he tried to contact Okeh in hopes of recording some more, the depression prevented this from becoming a reality.
www.geocities.com /theblueslady.geo/MississippiJohnHurt.html   (440 words)

  
 PBS - American Roots Music : The Songs and the Artists - Mississippi John Hurt   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Mississippi John Hurt was a modest farmer who grew up on the edge of the Mississippi Delta and stunned the music world with his unique three-fingered guitar style and warm, elegant vocals.
Hurt was not called back into the studios, though, and these were to be his last recordings for 35 years.
Hurt delighted young fans, living up to his famous saying, "Don't die 'til you're dead." On November 2, 1966, after enjoying four years of his second career, Mississippi John died in his sleep at his home in Grenada; he is buried near Avalon.
www.pbs.org /americanrootsmusic/pbs_arm_saa_mississippijohnhurt.html   (298 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
John Smith Hurt was born in Teoc on March 8, 1892.
John Hurt used to have a saying- "I don't like no confusion." You can hear it in his music, you could sense it in his life and you can feel it in the place where he chose to rest.
John Hurt was a self taught guitarist who's style of playing is now defined as "Country Blues".
nublues.port5.com /Historyoftheblues/johnhurt.htm   (1183 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt - GuitarZone.com \ Guitar Tab Universe FORUM
Mississippi John Hurt wasn't really considered a blues man. He recorded a couple of songs in the 20s, then quietly retired to sharecropping in Avalon MS until the 60's.
John Hurt's resting place is on a quiet hillside in a piney-woods, shaded and peaceful, among his loved-ones.
John had no desire to give up sharecropping for a career in music, but was afraid that if he refused, Hoskins (who he thought was working for the government) would make him go anyway.
www.guitarzone.com /forum/index.php?showtopic=168693   (3472 words)

  
 African American Registry: A Delta original, Mississippi John Hurt . . .
Hurt was spotted by Tommy Rockwell, a scout for Okeh records in 1928, and recorded that same year in Memphis and New York.
Hurt went back to work herding cows for 35 years, until Tom Hoskins, remembering the name of one of the '28 songs went to Avalon, near Greenwood, and asked for him.
Hurt's dexterity as a guitarist, coupled with his plain-spoken nature, took away from his following as a popular blues artist, at the time.
www.aaregistry.com /african_american_history/2726/A_Delta_original_Mississippi_John_Hurt___   (455 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt
Mississippi John Hurt is an enigma; one of the best known and best loved figures in fl musical tradition, yet one who received precious little biographical attention.
John Hurt died too early in the American blues revival for the kind of historical-biographical research which has come to be favoured by blues researchers, and which has shed so much light on other performers.
That omission of Hurt from Songsters and Saints is surprising.
www.mustrad.org.uk /reviews/hurt.htm   (1124 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt; Aaron's Site
Hurt was 35 years old when he journeyed alone, a beat-up guitar and business card in hand, from the Mississippi hill country to Memphis for his first session.
Hurt headed home and worked another season; under his sharecropping arrangement, half of the corn and cotton he grew on 13 acres was turned over to the land owner.
Rory Block was among those who made the pilgrimage to visit Hurt in D.C. "Mississippi John had recorded way back in the days of intense separatism," she says, "and then all of a sudden he was rediscovered by young white people, and he couldn't help but wonder what was going on.
www.stkate.edu /~lis753/winter04/lundholm/MJH/biography.html   (3522 words)

  
 Trail of the Hellhound: Mississippi John Hurt
While Hurt worked mostly outside music as a farmer and laborer, his musical reputation among whites as well as fls led to his first recording session in Memphis in 1928.
Hurt recorded eight sides for the Okeh label, two of which were released and sold well: "Frankie" and "Nobody's Dirty Business." In Memphis for the same recording session was St. Louis guitarist/pianist Lonnie Johnson, and Hurt later recalled that Blind Lemon Jefferson and Bessie Smith were also in town.
Mississippi John Hurt's grave is located outside his hometown of Avalon, Mississippi.
www.cr.nps.gov /delta/blues/people/msjohn_hurt.htm   (554 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt Bluejeans' Place
Mississippi John Hurt was one of the pioneers of blues music, helping to define a form called "country blues." Country blues music is the form which is played using an acoustic guitar, much like Robert Johnson is doing on the Columbia boxed set, "Robert Johnson, The Complete Recordings".
Mississippi John Hurt's contributions to blues music include a folk song-like lyrical style and guitar picking so complex it sounds like two guitarists are performing together.
A blues handout published by a local music producer stated Mississippi John Hurt is buried in a small Missionary Baptist cemetery on the top of a hill in Avalon, Mississippi.
www.bluejeansplace.com /MississippiJohnHurt.html   (836 words)

  
 Blues Hall of Fame-- Mississippi John Hurt
Hurt became the darling of the American folk scene in the Sixties and inspired all types of musicians-- from Bob Dylan to Dave Von Ronk, Jerry Garcia Doc Watson, Bill Morrisey and so many others.
Hurt was not just a master musician, but also a wonderful songwriter and storyteller and his music is instantly relateable with its low-down dirty tales of betrayed hearts and tragic deaths.
Hurt died in 1966 at the age of 74.
www.themusicarchive.com /drboom/fame/hurt.htm   (625 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt
Tom Hoskins was able to find Mississippi John Hurt after listening to the lyrics...
Mississippi John Hurt's grave is located outside his hometown of Avalon,...
When John Fillmore was twelve years old, he began to play flamenco guitar.
folks.mab-x-music.com /mississippi-john-hurt.html   (776 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
John Hurt was a self taught guitarist who's style of playing is now defined as "Country Blues".
The only recording John ever made in a different style was that of "Talking Casey" in which he used a slide.
John Hurt's success, although sweet, turned out to be relatively short.
www.schematicheaven.com /deltabluesland/artists/mississippi_john_hurt.htm   (565 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt Biography : Oldies.com
One of the major "rediscoveries" during the 60s folk blues revival, Mississippi John Hurt began playing at informal gatherings and parties at the turn of the century, when guitars were still relatively uncommon.
Although he worked within the idiom, Hurt did not regard himself as a blues singer and his relaxed, almost sweet, intonation contrasted with the aggressive approaches of many contemporaries.
He persuaded Hurt to undertake a series of concerts, which in turn resulted in several new recordings.
www.oldies.com /artist-biography/Mississippi-John-Hurt.html   (303 words)

  
 Review - Mississippi John Hurt: Live   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
In 1928, Hurt recorded 13 tracks of country blues, then disappeared from sight until two blues fans tracked him down in a remote part of Mississippi in 1963.
Hurt was a humble man, full of dignity and depth and his music exhibits the same characteristics.
Hurt was an American original in the acoustic county blues arena, the likes of which we may never see again.
www.cosmik.com /aa-september02/reviews/review_mississippi_john_hurt.html   (224 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt | MetaFilter
Missippi John Hurt is a masterful, magically skilled musician (I'm listnening to 'Corrina' at this very moment, an archetype of a song, widely improvised upon), and his style and delivery is unmistakably warm, comforting and utimately listenable.
Mississippi John Hurt was the charismatic beautiful soul all remember, no doubt, but there is no reason to turn him into this.
Hurt was a humble modest man who led, by all accounts, lived a quiet sober life and an excellent musician.
www.metafilter.com /23421/Mississippi-John-Hurt   (7066 words)

  
 Mississippi John Hurt
John Smith Hurt is my greatest inspiration as a Country Blues guitarist and as a human being.
Mississippi John Hurts fingerstyle guitar playing is an example of musical perfection.No extra notes, concise and to the point with exquisite tone.Anyone interested in playing fingerstyle guitar are doing themselves a disservice if they don't study his music.Taste over flash,tone over speed,John you are the man.
John's granddaughter, Mary Hurt Wright, is sponsoring the first John Hurt Homecoming, with the dedication of the museum in Hurt's memory July 4, 2002, on the Richardson place in the hills above Avalon, Mississippi.
www.deadbluesguys.com /dbg_logs/hurt_john_log.htm   (455 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: 1928: Comp Avalon Blues: Okeh: Music: Mississippi John Hurt   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
And the story of Mississippi John Hurt's "discovery" and renewed career at the end of his life in the 1960's is just wonderful.
Hurt was ahead of his time by 30 years, before the folk music scene was huge in the 60's, also he was looking back 20 years to the 1910's and ragtime.
Hurt's finger-picking style is unique and his lyrical approach is irresistible--you just have to hum along and tap those feet.
www.amazon.ca /1928-Comp-Avalon-Blues-Okeh/dp/B000002AEN   (1376 words)

  
 Metroactive Music | Mississippi John Hurt
In short measure, Hurt became a highly sought-after figure on the burgeoning folk-blues revival scene, playing festivals and college coffee houses and recording three new albums for the Vanguard label.
Hurt remained busy until 1966 when he was felled by a heart attack.
"John was not a grandstander as a performer," remembered John Sebastian, who often played harmonica with Hurt at cramped New York coffee houses.
www.metroactive.com /papers/sonoma/11.29.01/hurt-0148.html   (428 words)

  
 Rolling Stone : Beck, Lucinda Honor Hurt: Mississippi John Hurt
His voice, as soft and quiet as a breeze blowing through a screen door, gave his soft-spoken songs and spirituals a languor and calm that predated the impending blues storm of the Chicago electric age of the late Forties.
Hurt exemplified a gentler side of the blues, a country blues coaxed out of his modest guitar with dexterous finger picking.
Initially "discovered" in 1928, the onset of the Depression sent Hurt back into obscurity until his rediscovery in 1963, as a seventy-one-year-old Mississippi sharecropper who should have been thinking about retirement and not a life on the road as a bluesman.
www.rollingstone.com /artists/mississippijohnhurt/articles/story/5932889/beck_lucinda_honor_hurt   (725 words)

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