Mithradates Eupator - Factbites
 Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Mithradates Eupator


    Note: these results are not from the primary (high quality) database.


Related Topics

  
 Ancient coins of Pontus
Mithradates VI, Eupator (the ‘Great’), B.C. King of Pontus and Bosporus.
The following coin has been attributed to the mother of Mithradates VI, Eupator, who was regent of Pontus, B.C. Her name, however, is not stated by the historians, and the coin may belong to some other Pontic queen named Laodice (cf.
Pharnaces II, B.C. 63-47, son of Mithradates VI Eupator, struck AV staters for his kingdom of Bosporus; obv.
www.snible.org /coins/hn/pontus.html

  
 Mithradates VI and Rome
Mithradates VI Mithradates VI Eupator, king of Pontus, was by ancestry a Persian noble.
Mithradates VI Eupator Dionysus escaped from his mother's tutelage and went into hiding, returning after a number of years to take over Sinope (the capital).
He was murdered in 120, possibly by family members, and his wife Laodice became regent for his young children Eupator [Mithradates VI] and Chrestus.
www.uvm.edu /~bsaylor/rome/mithridates.html   (1062 words)

  
 WorldBook General Reference Encyclopedia > History > Ancient World > Middle East > Other Biographies > Mithridates VI >
Mithradates VI Eupator - Mithradates VI Eupator, d.
Meanwhile, Pompey had made his appearance in Asia, owing to rebellion by Mithridates VI Eupator, the king of Pontus.
63 BC, Panticapaeum [now in Ukraine] byname MITHRADATES THE GREAT, king of Pontus in northern Anatolia (120-63 BC).
www.surfablebooks.com /worldbookgeneral/History/Ancient%20World/Middle%20East/Other%20Biographies/Mithridates%20VI/1.htm   (1062 words)

  
 Ancient coins of Pontus
Mithradates VI, Eupator (the ‘Great’), B.C. King of Pontus and Bosporus.
Pharnaces II, B.C. 63-47, son of Mithradates VI Eupator, struck AV staters for his kingdom of Bosporus; obv.
The Bosporan coinage of Mithradates VI Eupator, king of Pontus, is described under his name, supra, p.
www.snible.org /coins/hn/pontus.html   (1062 words)

  
 Ancient coins of Pontus
Pharnaces II, B.C. 63-47, son of Mithradates VI Eupator, struck AV staters for his kingdom of Bosporus; obv.
The Bosporan coinage of Mithradates VI Eupator, king of Pontus, is described under his name, supra, p.
Mithradates I, B.C. 302-266, founder of the Kingdom of Pontus.
www.snible.org /coins/hn/pontus.html   (1905 words)

  
 DEMETRIUS - LoveToKnow Article on DEMETRIUS
His cruelties and vices, however, caused him to be greatly detested, and during another civil war he was defeated in a battle at Damascus, and killed near Tyre, possibly at the instigation of his wife, a daughter of Ptolemy VII., who was indignant at his subsequent marriage with a daughter of the Parthian king, Mithradates.
In 140 B.C. he marched against Mithradates, king of Parthia, but was taken prisoner by treachery, and remained in.
His portrait of Pellichus, a Corinthian general, with fat paunch and bald head, wearing a cloak which leaves him half exposed, with some of the hairs of his head flowing in the wind, and prominent veins, was admired by Lucian.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /D/DE/DEMETRIUS.htm   (2055 words)

  
 Ancient coins of Pontus
The Bosporan coinage of Mithradates VI Eupator, king of Pontus, is described under his name, supra, p.
Pharnaces II, B.C. 63-47, son of Mithradates VI Eupator, struck AV staters for his kingdom of Bosporus; obv.
Mithradates I, B.C. 302-266, founder of the Kingdom of Pontus.
www.snible.org /coins/hn/pontus.html   (2055 words)

  
 Mithridates
Portrait head of Mithradates VI Eupator of Pontus as Herakles (from Perseus Project).
The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus by B.C. McGing (Mnemosyne Ser.: Suppl.89)
www.isidore-of-seville.com /small/1.html   (2055 words)

  
 (47) Pontos, Mithradates VI the Great Eupator
Mithradates was a bitter enemy of Rome, with whom he fought three wars between 88 and 63 B.C. He saw himself as the protector of the Greeks, who initially welcomed his attempts to stave off the Romans, but in the end his rule was oppressive, and he met resistance even in his own territory.
He committed suicide in 63 B.C. Since most of Mithradates' coins are dated, the origin of the types on this tetradrachm can be traced to 89/88 B.C., the year of his great invasion of Asia Minor.
The portrait type was probably intended to appeal to the Greeks of Asia Minor, to whom he wanted to appear as their saviour, the new Alexander.
www.lawrence.edu /dept/art/buerger/catalogue/047.html   (362 words)

  
 W1040895
Greek forces of Mithradates "Eupator." At first glance most of these coins are in the name of
Mithradates' own career was the stuff of legend.
Mithradatic War swung back and forth until Mithradates was defeated by Pompey the Great.
www.jkerncoins.com /ads/Kern021802.html   (722 words)

  
 history of bosporos
The interference of Mithradates VI Eupator saved Chersonessos from the Skyth's rout but the city was included in a mandatory power of Pontos of Mithradates.
After the death of Mithradates (63 year BC) Chersonessos was in political and economic dependence on the Bosporos state.
Dioscuriada, Dioscurias - is an antique city on the Caucasian coast of the Black sea ( within the precincts of the modern city Sukhumi).
www.bank-notes.netfirms.com /Articles/Bosporos.htm   (722 words)

  
 Mithradates VI Eupator --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia Online Article
Mithradates VI Eupator --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia Online Article
"Mithradates VI Eupator." Britannica Concise Encyclopedia from Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service.
The grandson of Philip III and the nephew of Philip IV, Philip VI is important because his accession to the throne had serious consequences for both France and England.
www.britannica.com /ebc/article?eu=397619   (722 words)

  
 (47) Pontos, Mithradates VI the Great Eupator
Mithradates was a bitter enemy of Rome, with whom he fought three wars between 88 and 63 B.C. He saw himself as the protector of the Greeks, who initially welcomed his attempts to stave off the Romans, but in the end his rule was oppressive, and he met resistance even in his own territory.
He committed suicide in 63 B.C. Since most of Mithradates' coins are dated, the origin of the types on this tetradrachm can be traced to 89/88 B.C., the year of his great invasion of Asia Minor.
In contrast to their foreign features, short beards, and long sideburns, Mithradates, over fifty at the time, appears youthful, clean-shaven, and Hellenized, with the flowing hair and upward gaze associated above all with portraits of Alexander the Great (see no. 45).
www.lawrence.edu /dept/art/buerger/catalogue/047.html   (722 words)

  
 Mithridates VI of Pontus definition - info description meaning
Mithridates VI of Pontus, ( 132 BC - 63 BC), called Eupator Dionysius, was the king of Pontus in Asia Minor and one of Rome 's most formidable and successful enemies.
After his final defeat in 65 BC, Mithridates fled, and attempted to raise yet another army to take on the Romans, but failed to do so.
This play was the basis for many 18th century operas including one of Mozart's earliest, known most commonly by its Italian name, Mitridate, re di Ponto ( 1770).
www.definition-info.com /Mithradates_VI_of_Pontus.html   (722 words)

  
 Artist not recorded / Tetradrachm with head of Mithradates VI Eupator / 93/2 B.C.
Artist not recorded / Tetradrachm with head of Mithradates VI Eupator / 93/2 B.C. Artist not recorded
This image is one of over 118,000 from The Art Museum Image Consortium Library (The AMICO Library™), a growing online collection of high-quality, digital art images from 39 museums around the world.
Visit www.davidrumsey.com/amico for more information on the collection, click on the link below the revolving thumbnail to the right, or email us at amico@luna-img.com.
www.davidrumsey.com /amico/amico973722-23286.html   (722 words)

  
 A General History of the Near East, Chapter 6
The son of Pharnaces, Mithradates V (150-120), was the most powerful monarch in Asia Minor; he was followed by Mithradates VI Eupator Dionysus the Great (120-63), who enlarged the state with breathtaking success, coming very close to realizing the dream of Pharnaces.
Mithradates was only twelve years old when he inherited the Pontic throne in 120 B.C. After he grew up, however, he was a brilliant organizer, always picking the right man to do any job.
Mithradates I (171-138) was such an outstanding ruler that we now regard him as the true founder of the Parthian Empire.
xenohistorian.faithweb.com /neareast/ne06.html   (722 words)

  
 Mithridates
Portrait head of Mithradates VI Eupator of Pontus as Herakles (from Perseus Project).
The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus by B.C. McGing (Mnemosyne Ser.: Suppl.89)
Your name of Mithridates has created a most expressive nature, idealistic and inspirational, driven with a strong inner urge to be of service in some way that would uplift humanity as a whole.
www.isidore-of-seville.com /small/1.html   (538 words)

  
 Mithridates VI of Pontus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mithridates VI of Pontus, ( 132 BC - 63 BC), called Eupator Dionysius, was the king of Pontus in Asia Minor and one of Rome 's most formidable and successful enemies.
Mithridates was the son of Mithridates V of Pontus, called Euergetes.
Two curious legends are told of Mithridates VI of Pontus.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mithridates_VI_of_Pontus   (538 words)

  
 My Lines - Person Page 91
Mithradates Eupator VI, called ‘the Great’, sixteenth in descent (12th great-grandson) from Darius (son of) Hystaspes, the Great King and eighth in descent from the first king of independent Pontus, was laid away ceremoniously in the royal tombs of Sinop.
She married Mithradates V Eurgetes, King of Pontus, son of Pharnaces I, King of Pontus and Nysa, 0151 B.C. She was the daughter of Antiochus IV Epiphanes, King of Syria and Laodice III Seleucid.
He was the son of Mithradates II, King of Pontus and Laodice II, Princess of Syria.
homepages.rootsweb.com /~cousin/html/p91.htm   (538 words)

  
 (47) Pontos, Mithradates VI the Great Eupator
Mithradates was a bitter enemy of Rome, with whom he fought three wars between 88 and 63 B.C. He saw himself as the protector of the Greeks, who initially welcomed his attempts to stave off the Romans, but in the end his rule was oppressive, and he met resistance even in his own territory.
He committed suicide in 63 B.C. Since most of Mithradates' coins are dated, the origin of the types on this tetradrachm can be traced to 89/88 B.C., the year of his great invasion of Asia Minor.
In contrast to their foreign features, short beards, and long sideburns, Mithradates, over fifty at the time, appears youthful, clean-shaven, and Hellenized, with the flowing hair and upward gaze associated above all with portraits of Alexander the Great (see no. 45).
www.lawrence.edu /dept/art/buerger/catalogue/047.html   (538 words)

  
 Parthia: History
It was also during Mithradates II's reign that contact was first made with the Romans under Sulla during his campaign against Mithradates VI Eupator of Pontus.
By the time of Mithradates I's death, Parthia had expanded to include Mesopotamia, the richest and most populous of the regions in the Parthian empire, and the most Hellenized, as well as Elymais and Persis, thus completing their control of the overland trade routes between east and west.
The anarchy which followed Mithradates' death was finally ended in 77 BC by Sinatruces, brother of Mithradates II, who returned from exile among the Scythians at the age of eighty.
americanhistory.si.edu /collections/numismatics/parthia/frames/phisfm.htm   (538 words)

  
 mithridates_vi_of_pontus
Mithridates VI of Pontus, ( 132 BC - 63 BC), called Eupator Dionysius, was the king of Pontus in Asia Minor and one of...
Tigranes I of Armenia Major was an ally of Mithridates VI of Pontus against Rome in 69 BCE.
Under the rule of Tigranes I (the Great), the son-in-law of Mithridates VI of Pontus, Armenia fostered their own imperialistic designs in the early 1st century BC.
mithridates_vi_of_pontus.networklive.org   (538 words)

  
 Iranica.com - PONTUS
However, his policies perhaps pointed the way for his grandson Mithradates Eupator.
Geographically, Pontus divided into two distinct parts—a narrow, coastal strip,and a mountainous, inland region interspersed with fertile river valleys and separated from the sea by the Pontic Alps, which run parallel and close to the coast and which limited routes of communications between the two zones.
Strabo (12.1.4 C534) says that both Pontus and its neighbor to the south, Cappadocia, developed from the two Cappadocian satrapies of the Persian empire, and that it was the Macedonians—presumably he means the Seleucids—who had named one Pontus and the other Cappadocia.
www.iranica.com /articles/ot_grp5/ot_pontus_20040616.html   (538 words)

  
 Biographies: Mithradates VI :: 0 A.D. :: Wildfire Games
In 115 Mithradates had his mother imprisoned and his brother assassinated, thusly Mithradates, now Mithradates VI Eupator Dionysius, came to be the sole power in Pontus.
Mithradates VI showed early in his reign what kind of king he would be through displays of physical strength and force of character, this would in turn gain him the fame needed to fuel his Alexandrian ambitions.
Mithradates was born in 132 B.C. to Mithradates V Euergetes and an unknown woman.
www.wildfiregames.com /0ad/page.php?p=6888   (538 words)

  
 Ancient Art & Antiquities ancient greek bronze coin mithradates vi pontic coins
A Pontic bronze coin of Mithradates VI, Eupator, the Great.
Ancient Art & Antiquities ancient greek bronze coin mithradates vi pontic coins
www.bcgalleries.com.au /m162.html   (538 words)

  
 Mithridates VI Eupator the Great
, by Lucullus in the second 83–81, and by Pompey the Great in the third 74–64.
He was defeated by Sulla during the first Mithridatic War in 88–84
Attempts to copy Roman tactics and equipment failed to improve his army’s success rate.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0004867.html   (538 words)

  
 ARMENIANS (September 8, 1987)
Sometime later, the Artaxiad Tigranes II, the Great, (95-55 BC), along with his ally Mithradates VI (Eupator) of Pontus established a short-lived Armenian-Hellenistic empire which stretched from the Caucasus to Lebanon, and from Mesopotamia to the Pontic Alps.
This last Armenian kingdom fell in 1375; and the last Armenian king, Leo [Levon] V (VI), died in exile (1393) in France and is buried in the abbey church of Saint Denis, next to the tombs of the French kings to whom he was related.
This struggle was carried on in ernest when the founder of the Persian Sassanid dynasty, Ardashir I, overthrew the Parthian kingdom in Iran (AD 226), invaded Armenia, overwhelmed the Armenian Arsacids, and attacked the Roman Empire.
www.umd.umich.edu /dept/armenian/papazian/armenia.html   (538 words)

  
 Brink-Day-Johnston-Fletcher - Person Page 153
He also enteredinto alliance with Mithradates VI Eupator of Pontus, whose daughterCleopatra he married.
Mithradates II, to whom scholars before Rostovtzeff commonly assigned thetitled Mithradates I Ctistes, was the son of Mithradates I. Warned byhis friend Demetrius Poliorcetes, the son of Antigonus, that he hadincurred the same disfavour as his father, he fled to Paphlagonia, wherehe seized Cimiata, a fort at the foot of the Olgassys range.
In 72 the Romans forced Mithradates of Pontus to flee to Armenia, and, in69, Roman armies under Lucullus invaded Armenia.
www.brinkfamily.net /tree/p153.htm   (6693 words)

  
 Ancient coins of Pontus
The Bosporan coinage of Mithradates VI Eupator, king of Pontus, is described under his name, supra, p.
Pharnaces II, B.C. 63-47, son of Mithradates VI Eupator, struck AV staters for his kingdom of Bosporus; obv.
Mithradates I, B.C. 302-266, founder of the Kingdom of Pontus.
www.snible.org /coins/hn/pontus.html   (1940 words)

  
 Ancient coins of Pontus
The Bosporan coinage of Mithradates VI Eupator, king of Pontus, is described under his name, supra, p.
Pharnaces II, B.C. 63-47, son of Mithradates VI Eupator, struck AV staters for his kingdom of Bosporus; obv.
Mithradates I, B.C. 302-266, founder of the Kingdom of Pontus.
www.snible.org /coins/hn/pontus.html   (1905 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.