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Topic: Mithridates III of Parthia


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  Mithridates II of Parthia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Coin of Mithridates II from the mint at Seleucia.
Mithridates II (the Great), was the king of Parthia from c.
Mithridates II extended the limits of the empire, according to the 3rd century Roman historian Junianus Justinus who tends to confuse him with Mithridates III, under whom Parthia received severe setbacks.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mithridates_II_of_Parthia   (234 words)

  
 Mithridates : Mithradates
Mithridates I of Parthia[?] (171 - 137 BC)
Mithridates III of Parthia[?] (58 - 57 BC)
Mithridates VI of Pontus[?] (120 - 63 BC)
www.fastload.org /mi/Mithradates.html   (219 words)

  
 mithridates - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
The name Mithridates (more accurately, Mithradates) is derived from the Persian sun-god Mithra and the Indo-European root da, "to give" — i.e.
Mithradates, who fought first with Cyrus the Younger and after his death with Artaxerxes against the Greeks, and is the ancestor of the kings of Pontus.
Also, the word mithridates was once synonymous with antidote, and mithridatism meant the practice of taking repeated low doses of a poison with the intent of building immunity to it.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/mithridates   (187 words)

  
 Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Parthia was the arch-enemy of the Roman Empire in the East and it limited Rome's expansion beyond Cappadocia (central Anatolia).
By 129 BCE the Parthians were in control of all the lands right to the Tigris River, and established their winter encampment at Ctesiphon on the banks of the Tigris downstream from modern Baghdad in the Iranian province of Khvarvaran today known as Iraq.
After 110 CE, the Parthian king Vologases III dethroned the Armenian ruler, and the Roman emperor Trajan, a former general himself, decided to invade Parthia in retaliation.
www.toshare.info /en/Parthia.htm   (2938 words)

  
 Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Parthia ($700, 6x9-foot) is powerloomed of yarn-dyed New Zealand wool.
In 139 BCE, the Parthian king Mithridates I captured the Seleucid monarch, Demetrius Nicator, and held him captive for ten years, while the Parthians overwhelmed Mesopotamia and Media.
By 129 BCE the Parthians were in control of all the lands right to the Tigris River, and established their winter encampment at Ctesiphon on the banks of the Tigris downstream from modern Baghdad.
hallencyclopedia.com /Parthia   (1023 words)

  
 Mithridates -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Mithradates, a (A man who has been castrated and is incapable of reproduction) eunuch who helped (additional info and facts about Artabanus) Artabanus to assassinate (King of Persia who led a vast army against Greece and won the battle of Thermopylae but was eventually defeated (519-465 BC)) Xerxes I.
Also, the word mithridates was once synonymous with (A remedy that stops or controls the effects of a poison) antidote, and mithridatism meant the practice of taking repeated low doses of a (Any substance that causes injury or illness or death of a living organism) poison with the intent of building immunity to it.
These meanings were inspired by legends about (additional info and facts about Mithridates VI of Pontus) Mithridates VI of Pontus.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/M/Mi/Mithridates.htm   (281 words)

  
 Mithridates III of Parthia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Coin of Mithridates III from the mint at Nisa.
King Mithridates III of Parthia ruled the Parthian Empire c.
He was made king of Media and waged war against his brother, but was soon deposed on account of his cruelty.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mithridates_III_of_Parthia   (179 words)

  
 Read about Parthia at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Parthia and learn about Parthia here!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Parthia was the arch-enemy of the Roman Empire in the East and it limited Roman's expansion beyond Cappadocia (modern-day central Turkey).
After 110, the Parthian king Vologases III was forced to dethrone an Armenian leader, and the Roman emperor Trajan -a former general- decided to invade Parthia.
Parthia, now impoverished and without any hope to recover the lost territories, was demoralized.
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Parthia   (2578 words)

  
 PARTHIA FACTS, INFORMATIONS AND TRADES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Parthia was the arch-enemy of the Roman_Empire in the East and it limited Rome's expansion beyond Cappadocia (central Anatolia).
In 139_BCE, the Parthian king Mithridates I captured the Seleucid monarch, Demetrius Nicator, and held him captive for ten years, while his troops overwhelmed Mesopotamia and Media.
In 41_BCE, Parthia, led by Labienus, invaded Syria, Cilicia, and Caria and attacked Phrygia and Asia_Minor.
www.furtrade.com /Parthia   (2546 words)

  
 e. Parthia. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
Arsaces I founded the kingdom of Parthia, including at first only Parthia and Hyrcania, between the Seleucid kingdom in the west and the Bactrian kingdom in the east.
Parthia suffered a collapse and was greatly reduced in territory by Tigranes I of Armenia (c.
Phraates III restored order but was not strong enough to resist the Roman advance, led by Lucullus and Pompey.
www.bartleby.com /67/216.html   (402 words)

  
 MITHRADATES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Mithridates VI of Pontus, (132 BC- 63 BC), called Eupator Dionysius, was the king of Pontus in Asia Minor and one of Rome's most formidable and successful enemies.
Mithridates was the son of Mithridates V of Pontus, called Euergetes.
The second legend is that Mithridates sought to harden himself against poisoning by taking increasing sub-lethal doses of the poisons he knew of until he was able to tolerate lethal doses.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /definition/MITHRADATES   (675 words)

  
 Mithridates I of Parthia -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
thumb300pxrightCoin of Mithridates I from the mint at Seleucia.
Eastward Mithridates extended his control into Margiana, Aria and Bactria, thus completing Parthian control of the overland trade routes between east and west, the (An ancient trade route between China and the Mediterranean (4,000 miles); followed by Marco Polo in the 13th century to reach Cathay) Silk Road and the Persian Royal Road.
This control of trade was to be the foundation of Parthian wealth and power, and was jealously guarded by the Arsacids, who always attempted to maintain direct control over the lands through which the major trade routes passed.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/m/mi/mithridates_i_of_parthia.htm   (367 words)

  
 biology - Parthia
In 139 BC, the Parthian king Mithridates I captured the Seleucid monarch, Demetrius Nicator, and held him captive for ten years, while the Parthians overwhelmed Mesopotamia and Media.
By 129 BC the Parthians were in control of all the lands right to the Tigris River, and established their winter encampment at Ctesiphon on the banks of the Tigris downstream from modern Baghdad.
In his accounts Parthia is named "Anxi", a transliteration of "Arsacid", the name of the Parthian dynasty.
www.biologydaily.com /biology/Parthian   (2566 words)

  
 pippin iii - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
Pepin III (714 - September 24, 768) more often known as Pepin the Short (French, Ppin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine), was a King of the Franks (751 - 768).
He was born in 714 in Jupille, in what is today part of Belgium, but then a part of the kingdom of Austrasia.
Pepin III died at Saint Denis in 768 and is interred there in the Saint Denis Basilica with his wife Bertrada.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/Pippin-III   (444 words)

  
 [No title]
He was succeeded by his son Mithridates, to whom his achievements procured the surname of Great; for, being fired with a desire to emulate the merit of his ancestors, he was enabled by the vast powers of his mind to surpass their renown.
Mithridates king of the Parthians, after his war with Armenia, was banished from his kingdom for his cruelty by the Parthian senate.
But the fate of Parthia, in which it is now, as it were, customary that the princes should be assassins of their kindred, ordained that the most cruel of them all, Phraates by name, should be fixed upon for their king.
www.shsu.edu /~his_ncp/Parthian.html   (2690 words)

  
 mithradates   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
The earliest are Mithradates, the eunuch who helped Artabanus to assassinate Xerxes I and the Mithradates who fought first with Cyrus the Younger and after his death with Artaxerxes against the Greeks, and is the ancestor of the kings of Pontus.
After legends about Mithridates VI of Pontus, several books containing samples of various languages bore the title Mithridates and the practice of having underdoses of poison aiming to gain immunity is known as mithridatism.
This is a disambiguation page; that is, one that just points to other pages that might otherwise have the same name.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Mithradates.html   (265 words)

  
 Mithridates I of Parthia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
He was the son of Priapatius, King of Parthia (died 176 BC).
During his reign, the Parthians took Babylonia (144 BC), Media (141 BC) and Persia (139 BC), when Mithridates captured the Seleucid ruler Demetrius II of Syria.
Eastward Mithridates extended his control into Margiana, Aria and Bactria, thus completing Parthian control of the overland trade routes between east and west, the Silk Road and the Persian Royal Road.
www.info-en.com /index.php/Mithridates_I   (216 words)

  
 Mithridates III - TheBestLinks.com - Disambig, Mithridates III of Pontus, Mithridates III of Parthia, ...
Mithridates III - TheBestLinks.com - Disambig, Mithridates III of Pontus, Mithridates III of Parthia,...
Mithridates III, Disambig, Mithridates III of Pontus, Mithridates III of...
Mithridates III of Pontus (220 - 185 BC)
www.thebestlinks.com /Mithridates_III.html   (129 words)

  
 Christian History Handbook: Ancient: Appendix III   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Mithridates committed suicide in early 63 BC and Pharnaces promptly made peace with Pompey as a client king and retained the Bosporian Kingdom as well as the now smaller Pontic kingdom.
The affairs of Cleopatra III and Lathyros in South Syria are discussed elsewhere.
Cleopatra III died in 101 and the Ptolemy X Alexander I was killed in a Alexandrian riot in 87 BC.
www.sbuniv.edu /~hgallatin/ht3463aa03.html   (9844 words)

  
 generation 15 ('stamoudgrootouders')
Mithridates [Mithridata, Meherdates], king of Armenia circa 72 – 76, born circa 45, died circa 76, married:
Vologaeses I [Vologases, Valagash], (great-)king of Parthia 51 to 76/77, born 25, died 76 / 77, married:
Mithridates I Callinicus, king of Commagene circa 96–70/69, died -63, married:
www.mythopedia.info /ancestry-diadochi.htm   (1188 words)

  
 History of Iran: Parthian Empire
The end of this loosely organized empire came in 224 CE, when the last king was defeated by one of their vassals, the Persians of the Sassanid dynasty.
After the fall of the Achaemenid Empire, Parthia, northeastern Iran, was governed by the Seleucid kings: a Macedonian dynasty that ruled in the Asian territories of the former Persian Empire.
In the confusion, Parthia was overrun by the Parni, a nomad tribe from the Central-Asian steppe.
www.iranchamber.com /history/parthians/parthians.php   (1968 words)

  
 Fabricius Flavius/Parthia
But by 40 B.C. even Rome had to acknowledge a Parthia whose forces, under the joint command of Pacorus I and Q. Labienus, a Roman, had struck directly into the heart of the Roman East and captured the provinces of Asia, Pamphylia, Cilicia, and Syria; even as far south as Petra, Parthia's word was law.
The western border between Rome's dominions and Parthia gradually stabilized on the banks of the Euphrates, but war was always a threat and though major campaigns by the Romans were seen in A.D. 116, 161, 195, 217 and 232.
Parthian language is a Middle Iranian language originated in Parthia (mainly the northeastern corner of modern,Iran and central-western south of Turkmenistan),and became the oficial language of Arsacid period.
magellannarfe.com /Parthia   (1574 words)

  
 Parthia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Vassal kingdoms seem to have made up a large part of their territory (see Tigranes I of Armenia), and Hellenistic cities enjoyed a certain autonomy.
It was not until the second century BC that the Parthians profited from the increasing Seleucid weakness and gradually captured all of their territories east of Syria.
In 141 BCE, the Parthian king Mithridates I captured the Seleucid monarch, Demetrius Nicator, and held him captive for ten years, while the Parthians overwhelmed Mesopotamia and Media.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Parthian   (739 words)

  
 info: PARTHIA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Parthian Empire - The History of Ancient Parthia - The History of Ancient Parthia - Educational web site dedicated to the history and coins of ancient Parthia with sections on geography and resources..
Parthia: The Forgotten Empire - Uses Parthian drachmas to illustrate and illuminate the history of the Parthian Empire..
In his accounts Parthia is named 'Anxi' (Chinese: ??), a transliteration of 'Arsacid', the name of the Parthian dynasty.
www.cercalarima.com /Parthia   (3139 words)

  
 Parthia - Unipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Initially, a king named Arsaces established his indepence from Seleucid rule in remote areas of northern Persia ca 250 BCE, where his descendants of the same name ruled until Antiochus III the Great briefly made them submit to Seleucid authority again in 206 BCE.
In his accounts Parthia is named "Ānxī", a transliteration of "Arsacid", the name of the Parthian dynasty.
Report to the royal academy of Parthia for transmission to Phraataces, king of kings
www.unipedia.info /Parthia.html   (3027 words)

  
 info: Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Parthia: The Parthian Empire - History and Coins of Ancient Parthia The Parthian Empire The Parthian Empire is a fascinating period of Persian history closely connected to Greece and Rome.
Parthia (I)/Victoria 1870 - 1956 ack in the 1860 s, the transatlantic shipping industry was still in its cradle.
PARTHIA PARTHIA, the mountainous country S.E. of the Caspian Sea, which extends from the Elburz chain eastwards towards Herat, and is bounded on the N. by the fertile plain of Hyrcania (about Astrabad...
www.info-assicurazione.com /Parthia.html   (3231 words)

  
 Mithraism - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Mithraism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
A possible link between Persia and Rome, which could be the stage for these changes, may be the kingdoms of Parthia and Pontus in Asia Minor.
Several of their kings were called Mithradates, meaning "given by Mithra", starting with Mithradates I of Parthia (died 138 BC).
It would seem that, in those kingdoms, Mithra was a god whose power lent luster even to a king.
www.encyclopedia-glossary.com /en/Mithraism.html   (2973 words)

  
 Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Vassal kingdoms seem to have made up a large part of their territory (see Tigranes II of Armenia), and Hellenistic cities enjoyed a certain autonomy; their craftsmen received employment by some Parthians (illustration, above right).
Museum, Turkmenistan).]] Initially, a king named Arsaces established his dynasty independence from Seleucid rule in remote areas of northern Persia (what is today known as Turkmenistan) ca 250 BCE, where his descendants of the same name ruled until Antiochus III the Great briefly made them submit to Seleucid authority again in 206 BCE.
The date ΓΟΡ is the year 173 of the Seleucid era, corresponding to 140–139 BCE.]] Rebellions soon broke out due to the continuing loyalty of the population to Parthia.
www.abitabouteverything.net /files/p/pa/parthia.html   (2925 words)

  
 Middle East Open Encyclopedia: Mithridates I of Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Coin of Mithridates I from the mint at Seleucia.
He was the son of Phriapatius, King of Parthia (died c.
Iraq Museum International always displays the most recent published revision of the source article, Mithridates I of Parthia; all previous versions may be viewed here.
www.baghdadmuseum.org /ref/index.php?title=Mithridates_I_of_Parthia   (426 words)

  
 Mithridates - TheBestLinks.com - Asia Minor, Greece, Indo-European, Persia, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Mithridates, Asia Minor, Greece, Indo-European, Persia, Poison, Eunuch...
de:Mithridates nl:Mithridates The name Mithridates (more accurately, Mithradates) is derived from the Persian sun-god Mithra and the Indo-European root da, "to give" — i.e.
This is a disambiguation page, i.e., a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title.
www.thebestlinks.com /Mithridates.html   (295 words)

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