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Topic: Mlahso language


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In the News (Mon 12 Nov 18)

  
  Britain.tv Wikipedia - Semitic languages
Semitic languages were among the earliest to attain a written form, with Akkadian writing beginning in the middle of the third millennium BC.
A number of Gurage languages are to be found in the mountainous center-south of Ethiopia, while Harari is restricted to the city of Harar; Tigre, spoken in the northern Eritrean lowlands, has over a million speakers.
All Semitic languages exhibit a unique pattern of stems consisting of "triliteral"?title=or consonantal roots (normally consisting of three consonants), from which nouns, adjectives, and verbs are formed by inserting vowels with, potentially, prefixes, suffixes, or infixes.
www.britain.tv /wikipedia.php?title=Semitic_languages   (2245 words)

  
 Syriac language - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Western Middle Syriac is the official language of the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Syrian Catholic Church, the Maronite Church, the Malankara Syrian Orthodox Church, the Mar Thoma Church and the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church.
Eastern Middle Syriac is the liturgical language of the Assyrian Church of the East, the Chaldean Catholic Church and the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church.
The Mongol invasions of the thirteenth century led to the rapid decline of the language.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Syriac   (1054 words)

  
 Informat.io on Semitic Languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The term "Semitic" for these languages, after Shem son of Noah, is etymologically a misnomer in some ways (see Semitic), but is nonetheless standard.
A number of Gurage languages are to be found in the mountainous center of Ethiopia, while Harari is restricted to the city of Harar; Tigre, spoken in the Eritrean highlands, has over a million speakers.
Modern Ethiopian Semitic languages are SOV, possessor — possessed, and adjective — noun, probably due to Cushitic influence; however, the oldest attested Ethiopian Semitic language, Geez, was VSO, possessed — possessor, and noun — adjective[1].
www.informat.io /?title=semitic-languages   (2222 words)

  
 Semitic_languages info here at en.120-film.info   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Semitic languages were margined by the earliest to keep a written form, with Akkadian calligraphy spring in the straddle fence of the third millennium BC.
A cipher of Gurage languages are to be witness to in the mountainous center-south of Ethiopia, while Harari is chained to the urban of Harar; Tigre, spoken in the northern Eritrean lowlands, has closed a million speakers.
All Semitic languages a different game plan of stems liing of "triliteral" or consonantal roots (normally liing of two consonants), from which nouns, adjectives, 'n verbs are formed by inserting vowels with, potentially, prefixes, suffixes, or infixes.
en.120-film.info /Semitic_languages   (2507 words)

  
 Turoyo language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Turoyo is a Modern West Syriac language, a dialect of Aramaic.
A far older name for the language is Ṣurayt, and it is used by a number of speakers of the language in preference to Ṭuroyo.
The Modern Western Syriac dialect of Mlahso and `Ansha villages in Diyarbakır Province is quite different from Turoyo.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Turoyo_language   (900 words)

  
 Aramaic language - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site
It is the original language of large sections of the biblical books of Daniel and Ezra, and is the main language of the Talmud.
Aramaic is believed to have been the language spoken by Jesus, and it is still spoken today as a first language by numerous small communities.
As the language grew in importance, it came to be spoken throughout the Mediterranean coastal area of the Levant, and spread east of the Tigris.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=2303   (5664 words)

  
 Lishana Deni - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
It was originally spoken in the town of Zakho and its surrounding villages in northern Iraq, on the border with Turkey.
The language is sometimes called Targumic, due to the long tradition of translating the Hebrew Bible into Aramaic, and the production of targums.
However, uprooted from northern Iraq, and thrown together with so many different language groups in the fledgling nation, Lishana Deni began to be replaced in the speech of younger generations by Modern Hebrew.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Lishana_Deni   (459 words)

  
 Syriac   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
It was a major literary language throughout the Middle East from the 2nd century to the 8th century.
Western Middle Syriac is the official language of the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Syrian Catholic Church, the Maronite, the Malankara Syrian Orthodox Church, the Mar Thoma Church and the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church.
The main language of Modern Western Syriac is Turoyo language, the mountain tongue of Tur Abdin in eastern Turkey.
iwet.info /en/Syriac   (10340 words)

  
 Syriac, state, dialects, fricative, Church, vowels, Middle, vowel, ܩܠܐ, usually, three, first, Category - ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
It was a major literary language throughout the Middle East from the second to the eighth century AD.
It became the vehicle of Christianity and culture, spreading throughout Asia as far as Malabar and Eastern China and was the medium of communication and cultural dissemination for Arameans, Arabs, and to a lesser extent Persians.
In 132 BC, the kingdom of Osroene was founded in Edessa with Syriac as its official language.
www.alphasearch.org /directory/Syriac-language.html   (2233 words)

  
 SYRIAC LANGUAGE FACTS AND INFORMATION
Eastern Middle Syriac is the liturgical language of the Assyrian Church of the East (including the Chaldean Syrian Church), the Chaldean Catholic Church and the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church.
Syriac words, as with those in other Semitic languages, are built out of triliteral roots, permutations of three Syriac consonants.
As with most Semitic languages, the vowels of Syriac are mostly subordinated to consonants.
www.feefriend.com /Syriac_language   (2058 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Studies in Neo Aramaic: Books: Wolfhart Heinrichs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In an Aramaic grammar of mine is a newsclip that announces that the "language of Jesus" is still spoken in the Middle East.
Mlahso was spoken in a village near the town of Lice which was "destroyed during the Armenian massacres." Heinrichs says that this dialect should be considered extinct.
This volume is a study of their language.
www.amazon.ca /Studies-Neo-Aramaic-Wolfhart-Heinrichs/dp/1555404308   (482 words)

  
 Aramaic
It is also helpful to draw a distinction between those Aramaic languages that are modern living languages (often called Neo-Aramaic), those that are still in use as literary languages, and those that are extinct and are only of interest to scholars.
However, the Hebrew language had ceased to be the language of everyday life.
The language itself comes from Christian Old Palestinian, but its writing conventions were based on early Middle Syriac, and it was heavily influenced by Greek.
www.governpub.com /Languages-A/Aramaic.php   (6352 words)

  
 Aramaic language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Additionally, Koine Greek was an international language of the Roman administration and trade, and was widely understood by those in the urban spheres of influence.
Jewish Middle Babylonian is the language employed by Jewish writers in Babylonia between the 4th century and the 11th century CE.
It is most commonly identified with the language of the Babylonian Talmud (which was completed in the seventh century) and of post-Talmudic (Geonic) literarure, which are the most important cultural products Babylonian Jewry.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aramaic_language   (5646 words)

  
 yourDictionary.com • Endangered Language Initiative• Nearly Extinct Languages
This is a list of more than 750 languages found designated by Ethnologue as already extinct or nearly extinct today.
Of course, there are many more languages besides these in danger of extinction by the end of the century, many as yet undiscovered by Europeans.
This list will give you an idea of where the majority of threatened languages are spoken, if not their exact number.
www.yourdictionary.com /elr/nextinct.html   (94 words)

  
 Lishanid Noshan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is somewhat intelligible with the Jewish Neo-Aramaic languages of Hulaula (spoken to the east, in Iranian Kurdistan) and Lishan Didan (spoken to the north east, in Iranian Azerbaijan).
Dastit, the language of the plain, is the Aramaic dialect of the villages of the Plain of Arbil.
However, uprooted from their homes, and thrown together with so many different language groups in the fledgling nation, Lishanid Noshan began to be replaced in the speech of younger generations by Modern Hebrew.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lishanid_Noshan   (687 words)

  
 EveryTongue.com Language Recordings Main page
Here is the list of languages that you can hear if you order the cassette tape.
Here is a list of the languages that do not have a recording.
Here you can listen to a recording in a language you know and then listen to the same recording in a language that you want to learn.
www.everytongue.com   (531 words)

  
 Syriac
It is now spoken as a first language in small, scattered communities in Syria, Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan.
She is Christian and has been threatened by Islamic militants.
The historical and geographic area where the Kurds and their language came into existence and where they nowadays constitute an overwhelming majority has been referred to as Kurdistan.
www.governpub.com /Languages-S/Syriac.php   (2315 words)

  
 Ethnologue report for language code:lhs
Mlahsö was still spoken by a handful of people during the 1970s.
A different language from Turoyo, also called 'Suryoyo'.
This web edition of the Ethnologue contains all the content of the print edition and may be cited as:
www.ethnologue.com /show_language.asp?code=lhs   (79 words)

  
 Jewish-Languages Mailing List: November 2002
Bors Teodor, a graduate student at the Jewish Studies Institute in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, is working on research about Neo-Aramaic dialects.
He is in need of texts, especially in the Zakho, Turoyo, and Mlahso dialects.
If you have any way of helping him, please respond directly to Mr.
www.jewish-languages.org /ml/200211.html   (401 words)

  
 Informat.io on Syriac   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
For example, the root ܫܩܠ, ŠQL, has the basic meaning of taking, and so we have the following words that can be formed from this root:
Syriac also has a rich array of sibilant consonants:
This article is part of the series on Eastern Christianity — Also see the Eastern Christianity Portal
www.informat.io /?title=syriac   (2277 words)

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