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Topic: Moabite language


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  Semitic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Semitic languages were among the earliest to attain a written form, with Akkadian writing beginning in the middle of the third millennium BC.
Akkadian became the dominant literary language of the Fertile Crescent, using the cuneiform script they adapted from the Sumerians, while the sparsely attested Eblaite disappeared with the city, and Amorite is attested only from proper names.
A number of Gurage languages are to be found in the mountainous center of Ethiopia, while is restricted to the city of Harar; Tigre, spoken in the Eritrean highlands, has over a million speakers.
www.lighthousepoint.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Semitic_language   (1519 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Hebrew language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
This language family is generally thought by linguists to have originated somewhere in northeastern Africa, and began to diverge around the 8th millennium BCE, although there is much debate about the exact date and place.
Krymchak is the Crimean Tatar language dialect spoken by the Krymchaks - Rabbanite Jews of the Crimea.
An analytic language (or isolating language) is a language in which the vast majority of morphemes are free morphemes and considered to be full-fledged words.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Hebrew-language   (9705 words)

  
 Canaanite languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Canaanite languages are a subfamily of the Semitic languages, spoken by the ancient peoples of the Canaan region, including Canaanites, Hebrews, Phoenicians, and eventually Philistines.
All of them became extinct as native languages in the early first millennium CE, although Hebrew remained in continuous literary and religious use among Jews, and was revived as a spoken, everyday language in the nineteenth century by Eliezer Ben Yehuda.
in the Phoenician languages: Ahiram inscription,sarcophagus of Eshmunazar[1], Kilamuwa inscription, the Byblos inscription
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Canaanite_language   (290 words)

  
 moab   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The conflict between the Israelites and the Moabites is expressed in the biblical narrative describing the Moabites' incestuous origins.
At the death of Ahab the Moabites refused to pay tribute and asserted their independence, making war upon the kingdom of Judah.
Isaiah (15, 16, 25:10-12) predicts the utter annihilation of the Moabites; and they are frequently denounced by the subsequent prophets.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Moab.html   (645 words)

  
 Hebrew language - TheoWiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Hebrew language - the language of the Hebrew nation, and that in which the Old Testament is written, with the exception of a few portions in Chaldee.
(See MOABITE STONE.) The Semitic languages, to which class the Hebrew and Phoenician belonged, were spoken over a very wide area: in Babylonia, Mesopotamia, Syria, Palestine and Arabia, in all the countries from the Mediterranean to the borders of Assyria, and from the mountains of Armenia to the Indian Ocean.
The rounded form of the letters, as seen in the Moabite stone, was probably that in which the ancient Hebrew was written down to the time of the Exile, when the present square or Aramaic form was adopted.
theowiki.com /index.php/Hebrew_language   (428 words)

  
 Semitic Languages (and the Phoenician language)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Ancient languages spoken by non-Arab population of these many Middle Easter countries continue to survive in the dialects/languages of everyday life and the roots of the older languages of the Phoenician, Aramaic, Syriac, Assyrian, Coptic...etc. are still evident.
Ancient languages spoken by non-Arab population of these countries continue to survive in the dialects/languages of everyday life and the roots of the older languages of the Phoenician, Aramaic, Syriac, Assyrian, Coptic...etc. are still evident.
It diverged from the South Arabian languages around the beginning of the Christian era, reaching its greatest extension in the 4th century AD, when it was spoken especially in the kingdom of Aksum on either side of the present-day border of Ethiopia and Eritrea.
phoenicia.org /semlang.html   (2729 words)

  
 Hebrew language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
While the term "Hebrew" as a nationality is customarily used to refer to the ancient Israelites, the classical Hebrew language was extremely similar to the Canaanite languages spoken by their neighbors, such as Phoenician languagePhoenician; indeed, Moabite languageMoabite/ and Hebrew are often considered to be two dialects of the same language.
This language family is generally thought by linguists to have originated somewhere in northeastern Africa, and began to diverge around the 8th millennium BC, although there is much debate about the exact date and place.
By the end of the 3rd millennium BC the ancestral languages of Aramaic, Ugaritic, and other various Canaanite languages were spoken in the Levant alongside the influential dialects of Ebla and Akkad.
www.infothis.com /find/Hebrew_language   (5273 words)

  
 Languages Of The Old Testament (International Standard Bible Encyclopedia) :: Bible Tools
The languages spoken in Southwestern Asia during the historical period dealt with in the Bible have been named Shemitic, after the son of Noah from whom the majority of peoples speaking these languages--Arabs, Hebrews, Arameans and Assyrians (Genesis 10:21 ff.)--were descended.
These languages were spoken from the Caspian Sea to the South of Arabia, and from the Mediterranean to the valley of the Tigris.
That Hebrew was not the language of Abraham before his migration appears from the fact that he is called an Aramean (Deuteronomy 26:5), and that Laban's native language was Aramaic (Genesis 31:47).
bibletools.org /index.cfm/fuseaction/Def.show/RTD/ISBE/ID/5418   (3784 words)

  
 Semitic languages - Biocrawler definition:Semitic languages - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
With the expansion of Ethiopia under the Solomonid dynasty, Amharic, previously a minor local language, spread throughout much of the country, replacing languages both Semitic (such as Gafat) and non-Semitic (such as Weyto) and replacing Ge'ez as the principal literary language; this spread continues to this day, with Kemant set to disappear in another generation.
A number of Gurage languages are to be found in the mountainous center of Ethiopia, while Harari is restricted to the city of Harar; Tigre, spoken in the Eritrean highlands, has over a million speakers.
The curious phenomenon of broken plurals, found most profusely in the languages of Arabia and northern Ethiopia, may be partly of proto-Semitic origin, but has been very substantially elaborated from its simpler origins in languages such as Arabic.
www.biocrawler.com /biowiki/Semitic_language   (1578 words)

  
 Hebrew_languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The language was Akkadian, the predominating language of the Chaldees.
The language was an early form of the Aramaic language, more specifically the same language spoken by Laban, another descendant of Terah.
The language was one of the extinct Hurro-Urartian languages, a non-Semitic language family based in eastern Anatolia.
www.usedaudiparts.com /search.php?title=Hebrew_languages   (445 words)

  
 Historical proof of the Bible
Mesha, king of the Moabites, those distant cousins of the Israelites who lived on the east side of the Dead Sea, is introduced in the Bible in the third chapter of 2 Kings [2 Kgs.
The Moabite Stone is an inscription in the Moabite language, a Semitic language closely related to biblical Hebrew.
Perhaps the Moabites and others borrowed these customs from the Israelites, or, more probably, since the Moabites are descendants from Abraham's nephew Lot through the latter's daughter (see Gen. 19:37), there would be much in the way of religion and culture that they would share in common.
agards-bible-timeline.com /q9_historical_proof_bible.html   (2084 words)

  
 Phoenician language --¬† Encyclop√¶dia Britannica   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Semitic language of the Northern Central (often called Northwestern) group, spoken in ancient times on the coast of Syria and Palestine in Tyre, Sidon, Byblos, and neighbouring towns and in other areas of the Mediterranean colonized by Phoenicians.
Phoenician is very close to Hebrew and Moabite, with which it forms a Canaanite subgroup of the Northern Central Semitic...
A language family that covers a broad geographical region and a vast historical period, the Semitic language group is part of an even larger language family known as Afro-Asiatic, or Hamito-Semitic.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9059755?tocId=9059755   (883 words)

  
 Easton's Bible Dictionary
The Moabites were alarmed, and their king, Balak, sought aid from the Midianites (Num 22:2).
After the Return, it was Sanballat, a Moabite, who took chief part in seeking to prevent the rebuilding of Jerusalem (Neh 2:19; Neh 4:1; Neh 6:1).
Moabite Stone A basalt stone, bearing an inscription by King Mesha, which was discovered at Dibon by Klein, a German missionary at Jerusalem, in 1868.
www.sacred-texts.com /bib/ebd/ebd258.htm   (1486 words)

  
 Bible Tools & Resources - ChristianWebSite.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Moabite Stone - a basalt stone, bearing an inscription by King Mesha, which was discovered at Dibon by Klein, a German missionary at Jerusalem, in 1868.
With the exception of a very few variations, the Moabite language in which the inscription is written is identical with the Hebrew.
The form of the letters here used supplies very important and interesting information regarding the history of the formation of the alphabet, as well as, incidentally, regarding the arts of civilized life of those times in the land of Moab.
www.christchat.com /bible/kjv/easton/east2586.htm   (156 words)

  
 The Languages of the Bible
God's use of different languages in the Bible followed a pattern of focusing first on one region, then widening the scope of the message to include an empire, and finally including the entire known world between India and Ireland.
The famous Mesha Stone, an archaeological relic from the ninth century BC, illustrates that the ancient Moabite language was similar to Biblical Hebrew.
The language of the Jews who had returned to the biblical land of Israel under the Persian Empire was distinct from the gentiles who also inhabited that land.
www.kubik.org /vcm/language.htm   (2995 words)

  
 Hebrew language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Hebrew is categorized as a part of the Canaanite group of the Semitic languages, to which also the ancient languages Phoenician and Moabite belonged.
Hebrew of today is a spoken language that is based upon the written Hebrew from old Hebrew texts, and is the only colloquial speech in the world based on a written language.
This becomes the language with which the Old Testament later is written.
i-cias.com /e.o/hebrew.htm   (472 words)

  
 The Mesha Stone   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The stele which is written in Moabite, a language almost identical to Hebrew, has posed problems for scholars who wish to use it as a corroborative piece of evidence for the bible.
The subtle differences in language have been a source of error that has caused some disagreement over names and places mentioned within the stele and the accounts found in the bible.
Rather, it is his belief that Kir-hareseth is in fact a Hebrew name for the Moabite town of Karchoh and should therefore be located north of the Arnon River and not south of it as it has been previously assumed (Converting 88).
www.creighton.edu /~jaywok/Mesha-right.htm   (3339 words)

  
 Jewish, Jewish, Everywhere, & not a drop to drink
Canaanite languages by the children of Isaac and Lot, Arabian languages by the children of Ishmael, and later, old dialects of Aramaic, Arabic, Spanish and German by the Jewish diaspora for their daily discourse.
The "XXX language" articles should mention the history of the language, but should write on the XXX language from the perspective of a living language, not as a perverted dialect of a "holy" language that used to exist.
The Hebrew language might be appropriately called the Israelitish dialect of Canaanitish, a branch of the Semitic Languages spoken in Palestine and in the Phenician colonies.
simshalom.blogspot.com /2004_07_01_simshalom_archive.html   (15480 words)

  
 Edomite language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The Edomite language is the extinct Hebrew languagesHebrew Canaanite language of the Edomites in southwestern Jordan in the first millennium BC.
Biblically, since "Edom" is an alternate name of Esau, who was a descendant of Eber through Abraham, the Edomites are regarded as being a Hebrew people, as are the Moabites and Ammon (nation)Ammonites.
For this reason, the four closely related south Canaanite languages/ are sometimes termed "Hebrew languages".
www.infothis.com /find/Edomite_language   (137 words)

  
 Ancient Texts Relating to the Bible: El-Kerak
Moabite is a language very much like ancient Hebrew and it was spoken by the people who lived in the country of Moab.
Another inscription in Moabite, known as the Moabite Stone, tells about the victory of Mesha, king of Moab, over one of the descendants of Omri, king of Israel.
The alphabet used is like the one the Israelites used until the 6th to the 4th centuries B.C.E. It is the alphabet developed by the Phoenicians and adopted by a number of other peoples, including the Greeks.
www.usc.edu /dept/LAS/wsrp/educational_site/ancient_texts/ElKerak.shtml   (195 words)

  
 The Rosetta Project: the 1000 language archive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Moabite texts are available in the categories below.
A brief language description provided courtesy of the Summer Institute of Linguistics.
Send a message to a language specialist or native speaker who might be able to review or contribute materials.
www.rosettaproject.org /live/search/detailedlanguagerecord?ethnocode=XMOA   (99 words)

  
 Hebrew language (WebBible Encyclopedia) - ChristianAnswers.Net
the language of the Hebrew nation, and that in which the Old Testament is written, with the exception of a few portions in Chaldee
They now spoke Hebrew with a large admixture of Aramaic or Chaldee, which latterly became the predominant element in the national language.
The rounded form of the letters, as seen in the Moabite stone, was probably that in which the ancient Hebrew was written down to the time of the Exile, when the present square or Chaldean form was adopted.
www.christiananswers.net /dictionary/hebrewlanguage.html   (400 words)

  
 History of the Bible
Hebrew, the northwest branch of the Semitic languages, is one of the world's oldest living languages dating beyond 2000 B.C., but the OT refers to it as "the language of Canaan" (Isa.
850 B.C. thirty-four lines, in the Moabite language, a dialect of the Hebrew (almost pure, using the old "round" letters), by Mesha, king of the Moabites The inscription gives an account found in 2 Kings 3 in the time of Ahaziah and Joram, the sons of Ahab.
Today, Hebrew still serves as the language of Judaism, the religion of the Jews, and is also the official language of Israel, although some write in Yiddish.
www.mazzaroth.com /ChapterThree/HistoryOfTheBible.htm   (2660 words)

  
 [No title]
This is a Moabite inscription written in the Moabite language, but in Hebrew letters which the Moabites adopted in all likelihood from the northern kingdom of Israel.
The language is Moabite, so the text is Moabite.
As to the language, an abecedary of course does not contain linguistic elements sufficient to determine the language.
oi.uchicago.edu /OI/ANE/ANE-DIGEST/1998/v1998.n277   (4692 words)

  
 icira.net : Moab   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The Moabites were closely related to the Hebrews and were subject to Kingdom of Israel during the reigns of David and Solomon (11th-10th century BCE).
Thereafter the Moabites ceased to exist as a separate people.
The Moabite stone, a block of fl basalt found near Dibon, Jordan, in 1868, bears an inscription in the Moabite language from about 850 BCE which describes a victory of King Mesha of Moab over the Israelites in the early 9th century BCE.
icira.net /tiki-index.php?page=Moab   (225 words)

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