Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Mohs scale of mineral hardness


Related Topics

  
  Baxter’s The Jewellers, Birthstone Information
On the Mohs scale of hardness aquamarine measures 7-5 to 8 and is therefore a durable stone.
Sapphire and ruby have a hardness of 9 on the Mohs scale.
Mohs' scale of hardness was developed by Friedrich Mohs (1773-1839) and measures the hardness of "rock" on a scale of 1 to 10.
www.baxtersjewellers.com /birthstone_information.html   (2514 words)

  
 Desert Moissanite-Exquisite Moissanite!
The Mohs Scale is used to determine the hardness of solids, especially minerals.
The hardness of a mineral is a measure of its ability to resist abrasion or scratching by other minerals or by an object of known hardness.
The scale consists of 10 minerals arranged in increasing hardness with 1 being the softest.
www.desertmoissanite.com /moissanite-mohs.html   (672 words)

  
  How To Identify Minerals: Hardness
The hardness scale was established by the German mineralogist, Friedrich Mohs.
The Mohs’ hardness scale places ten common or well-known minerals on a scale from one to ten.
To use the hardness scale, try to scratch the surface of an unknown sample with a mineral or substance from the hardness scale (these are known samples).
www.sdnhm.org /kids/minerals/howto-hardness.html   (184 words)

  
  Mohs scale of mineral hardness - Wikipedia
Mohs' scale of mineral hardness was created by the German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs to measure hardness.
The scale is neither linear nor logarithmic: for example, corundum is twice as hard as topaz, but diamond is almost four times as hard as corundum.
The absolute hardness of minerals is measured with a sclerometer[?].
www.facetroughgemstones.com /wikipedia/mo/Mohs_scale_of_mineral_hardness.html   (106 words)

  
 Mineral - Wikipedia
Hardness: the physical hardness of a mineral is usually measured according to the Mohs scale of mineral hardness.
The largest group of minerals by far are the silicates, which are composed largely of silicon and oxygen, with the addition of ions such as magnesium, iron and calcium.
The halides are the group of minerals forming the natural salts and include fluoride, common salt (known as halite[?]) and sal ammoniac[?] (ammonium chloride).
www.facetroughgemstones.com /Mineral.html   (892 words)

  
 Mineral Kingdom - Crystalinks
Minerals range in composition from pure elements and simple salts to very complex silicates with thousands of known forms (organic compounds are usually excluded).
A mineral is a naturally occurring, inorganic substance with a definite chemical composition and a crystalline structure.
The largest group of minerals by far are the silicates, which are composed largely of silicon and oxygen, with the addition of ions such as aluminium, magnesium, iron, and calcium.
www.crystalinks.com /mineral.html   (1247 words)

  
 Mohs scale - Search Results - MSN Encarta   (Site not responding. Last check: )
- hardness scale: a scale used to measure the hardness of minerals, with talc at zero and diamond at 10.
The hardness of a mineral determines how durable it will be.
The Mohs scale is used to rate the relative hardness of a material by performing...
ca.encarta.msn.com /Mohs_scale.html   (124 words)

  
 ISM Geology Online - The Mohs' Hardness Scale   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Hardness is one measure of the strength of the structure of the mineral relative to the strength of its chemical bonds.
Hardness is generally consistent because the chemistry of minerals is generally consistent.
The Mohs' Hardness Scale, starting with talc at number 1 and ending with diamond at number 10, is universally used around the world as a way of distinguishing minerals.
geologyonline.museum.state.il.us /tools/background/mohs/index.html   (213 words)

  
 Diamonds | American Museum of Natural History
Hardness is the measure of a substance's resistance to being scratched, and only a diamond can scratch another diamond.
When the mineral hardness numbers from the Mohs scale are plotted against those on the more quantitative Knoop scale (based on the force needed to make indentations using a diamond), we can see how it doesn't adequately express the extreme hardness of diamond.
The Mohs scale is relatively stable until it reaches the eighth mineral topaz, but it jumps exponentially from corundum (colorless sapphire) to diamond.
www.amnh.org /exhibitions/diamonds/hardness.html   (149 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Mohs scale of mineral hardness characterizes the scratch resistance of various minerals through the ability of a harder material to scratch a softer material.
Mohs based the scale on ten minerals that are all readily available (except for diamond).
The Mohs scale is a purely ordinal scale.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Mohs_hardness   (297 words)

  
 Mohs Scale   (Site not responding. Last check: )
While hardness is generally associated with durability, the ability to resist breakage is better described as toughness.
Regardless of which scale is used, the diamond is considered the hardest substance known to man. The most common measure of a gemstone's degree of hardness is based on the Mohs Scale.
What the scale means is that a mineral of a given hardness rating will scratch other minerals of the same rating, as well as any minerals of a lower hardness rating.
www.altobelli.com /html/mohs_scale.html   (201 words)

  
 Mohs Hardness Scale
Mohs' scale of mineral hardness quantifies the scratch resistance of minerals by comparing the ability of a harder material to scratch a softer material.
The Mohs scale was invented in 1812, by the German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs.
It is an isometric mineral with a cubic crystal habit.
www.khulsey.com /jewelry/mohs_hardness_scale.html   (528 words)

  
 Mohs' Mineral Hardness Scale   (Site not responding. Last check: )
He invented a simple relative hardness scale and scratch test to help tell the difference between minerals.
Mohs' scale is made of ten minerals that are arranged in order of hardness.
Talc as the softest mineral and is given the number 1.
www.juniorgeo.co.uk /D_hardness.html   (173 words)

  
 Mohs Scale of Hardness
Since hardness depends upon the crystallographic direction (ultimately on the strength of the bonds between atoms in a crystal), there can be variations in hardness depending upon the direction in which one measures this property.
The scratch hardness is related to the breaking of the chemical bonds in the material, creation of microfractures on the surface, or displacing atoms (in metals) of the mineral.
Diamonds are an important mineral component in cutting tools for the manufacturing of metals and other substances, forming dies for the drawing of wires, and for cutting cores in oil wells and mineral exploration.
www.minsocam.org /MSA/collectors_corner/article/mohs.htm   (629 words)

  
 Moh' s Hardness Scale - Jewelry Armoire
In 1812 the famed German mineralogist, Freidrich Mohs, devised a mineral hardness scale that is still used to measure the hardness of minerals, gems, and crystals.
The scale arranges the minerals from the hardest to the softest.
Remember Moh's Hardness Scale -- Just because a ring has a stone in it doesn't mean that it is not vulnerable to scratches.
www.homefurnish.com /bedbathstorage/bedroomfurniture/mohshardnessscale.aspx   (284 words)

  
 Mohs scale of mineral hardness Summary
Mohs' scale utilizes 10 specific representative materials that are arranged numerically from the softest (1) to the hardest (10).
Mohs' scale is a relative index scale, meaning that a determination of Mohs'hardness number for a mineral is based upon scratch tests.
Mohs' is a purely ordinal scale with, for example, corundum being twice as hard as topaz, but diamond, almost four times as hard as corundum.
www.bookrags.com /Mohs_scale_of_mineral_hardness   (732 words)

  
 Alphabetical Glossary H
Hardness is measured using the Mohs Scale of Hardness.
In the Mohs scale, a mineral of a given hardness rating will scratch other minerals of the same rating, as well as any minerals of a lower rating.
The Mohs scale of mineral hardness was devised by the German mineralogist Frederich Mohs (1773-1839) in 1812.
www.craftland.net /learning/alphabetical-glossary-h.htm   (1239 words)

  
 Mineral Gallery: Hardness
Hardness is one measure of the strength of the structure of the mineral relative to the strength of its chemical bonds.
Minerals with small atoms, packed tightly together with strong covalent bonds throughout tend to be the hardest minerals.
Keep in mind that most minerals have small differences in hardness according to the direction of the scratch and the orientation of the scratch and that some minerals such as kyanite and diamond, have a marked difference in hardness with respect to these factors.
mineral.galleries.com /minerals/property/hardness.htm   (1028 words)

  
 Mohs' scale   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A scale of hardness primarily used for minerals, devised around 1812 by Friedrich Mohs (1773 — 1839), a German minerologist, and published by him in 1824.
Mohs’ scale consists of 10 common minerals in order of increasing hardness (shown in the second column below).
Increasingly sophisticated methods for measuring hardness showed that the steps in Mohs' scale are far from equal, especially at the high end.
www.sizes.com /units/mohs_scale.htm   (217 words)

  
 Moh's Hardness Scale - JewelryArmoire.com
It became known as the Moh's Hardness Scale and is still used today to measure the hardness of minerals.
It's important to understand Moh's scale, which gives an idea of the hardness of some of the stones found in your jewelry box.
The scale arranges the minerals from the hardest to the softest.
www.jewelryarmoire.com /mohhardnessscalearticle.cfm   (353 words)

  
 Gemstone Hardness
The Moh’s hardness scale was created by a German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs, it mainly measures the scratch resistance of various minerals, through the ability of a harder material to scratch or abrade a softer mineral.
There are ten materials on the Moh’s scale and they are listed from soft to hard, besides their rank, they are given an absolute hardness score.
For instance, talc is the softest mineral and has an absolute hardness score of 1, Diamonds are the hardest material known to man and have an absolute hardness score of 15,000.
www.gemstoneeducation.com /Hardness.htm   (206 words)

  
 Mohs scale of mineral hardness
The Mohs scale of mineral hardness characterizes the scratch resistance of various minerals through the ability of a harder material to scratch a softer material.
Mohs based the scale on ten minerals that are all readily available.
On the Mohs scale, fingernailhas hardness 2.5; copper penny, about 3.5; a knife blade, 5.5; window glass, 5.5; steel file, 6.5.[[1]] Using these ordinary materials of known hardness can be a simple way to approximate the position of a mineral on the scale.
www.photonicsknowledge.com /optics/Mohs_scale_of_mineral_hardness   (309 words)

  
 Talc - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Talc is a mineral composed of hydrated magnesium silicate with the chemical formula H
It is sectile and very soft, with a hardness of 1 (Talc is the softest of the Mohs' scale of mineral hardness).
Talc is a metamorphic mineral resulting from the alteration of silicates of magnesium such as pyroxenes, amphiboles, olivine and other similar minerals.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Talc   (392 words)

  
 Hardness   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The scratch hardness of diamond is assigned the value of 10 on the Mohs scale of hardness; corundum, the mineral next to diamond in hardness, is rated as 9.
We measure a mineral's hardness by comparing it to the hardnesses of a standardized set of minerals first established by Friederich Mohs in the early nineteenth century, or with the common testing materials that have been calibrated to those standards.
The Mohs Hardness Scale is a relative scale.
geology.csupomona.edu /alert/mineral/hardness.htm   (488 words)

  
 The Mohs’ Scale of Mineral Hardness
The Mohs' Scale was devised in the 19th century by German mineralogist Fredrich Mohs.
A mineral with a Mohs' hardness of 7 will scratch any mineral of the same hardness or less, but can be scratched itself by a mineral with the same or higher number.
To give you some idea of the hardness of every day things, a fingernail has a Mohs' hardness of 2.5, a penny is 3, a knife blade or fragment of window glass is 5.5 - 6, while a small piece of emery cloth is between 8 and 9.
www.home-jewelry-business-success-tips.com /mohs-scale.html   (437 words)

  
 Mineral Hardness Testing from Rockman
Determining the hardness of an unknown rock or mineral is often very useful in the identification process.
Hardness is a measure of a mineral's resistance to abrasion and is measured against a standard scale - Mohs Scale of Hardness.
It consists of 10 fairly common minerals (except for the diamond) of known hardness which are numerically ordered from the softest (1) to the hardest (10).
www.rocksandminerals.com /hardness/mohs.htm   (594 words)

  
 Garnet Mineral,Natural Garnet,Red Garnet,Garnet Suppliers,Garnet Mineral Uses
Garnet is a common mineral of metamorphic rocks such as gneiss and schist of all description from basic to acid, crystalline limestone and pegmatites.
Six minerals are commonly regarded as belonging to the garnet family.
Garnets all are quite hard, ranging between 6 and 7.5 on the Mohs' hardness scale.
www.mineralszone.com /minerals/garnet.html   (837 words)

  
 Mohs Hardness Test   (Site not responding. Last check: )
During the early 1800s, a German mineralogist named Friedrich Mohs devised a scale that tested mineral hardness, which means the resistance of a mineral to being scratched.
This scale, which ran from 1 to 10, was named after Mohs, and is known as the Mohs Hardness Test.
While a reference set of the above minerals may be used to test the hardness of an unknown mineral, such a set is rarely used in actual practice; particularly because diamond is rather expensive to be used as an abrasive.
servercc.oakton.edu /~billtong/eas100lab/hardness.htm   (465 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.