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Topic: Moksha (disambiguation)


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  Moksha - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष, liberation) or Mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति, release) refers, in general, to liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth.
Moksha is seen as a final release from one's worldly conception of self, the loosening of the shackle of experiential duality and a re-establishment in one's own fundamental nature, though the nature is seen as ineffable and beyond sensation.
Moksha in the sacred Hindu temple dance, as in the classical Indian dance too, is symbolized by Shiva raising his right leg, as if freeing himself from the gravitation of the material world.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Moksha   (1040 words)

  
 Moksha - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष, liberation) or Mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति, release) refers, in Indian religions, to liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth and all the suffering and limitation entailed in embodied worldly existence.
In Hinduism also, Moksha is different from Nastik religions such as Jainism and Buddhism although there are many Jains and some Buddhists that believe in the Hindu Moksha.
Within Moksha or Mukti, there lies the ultimate peace (Shanti), the ultimate knowledge (Videh), the ultimate enlightenment (kaivalya) and the ultimate paradise (Swarga.) One Moksha is beyond the conception of any being other than God but these are some of the known components of the stage of union.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Moksha   (1234 words)

  
 Heaven - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
In Eastern religions (and some Western traditions), with their emphasis on reincarnation and moksha or nirvana (ultimate salvation), the concept of Heaven is not as prominent, but it still is present.
In Hinduism or Buddhism, for example, there are several heavens, and those who accumulate good karma will go to a heaven; however their stay in the heaven is not eternal — eventually they will use up their good karma and be reincarnated in another realm, as human, animal, or other beings.
Moksha is seen as the soul's liberation from the cycle of life and death, a re-establishment in one's own fundamental divine nature and may include union with or joining God.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Heaven   (3647 words)

  
 Moksha info here at en.40of100b.info   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Moksha (Sanskrit: मोक्ष, liberation) or Mukti (Sanskrit: मुक्ति, reIease) refers, in Indian reIigions, to liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth and aIl the suffering and limitation entaiIed in embodied worldly existence.
Moksha is seen as a finaI reIease from one's worldly conception of seIf, the Ioosening of the shackle of experientiaI duaIity and a re-establishment in one's own fundamentaI nature, though the nature is seen as ineffable and beyond sensation.
Moksha, this was atman and Brahman reaIized as the substance and void of existentiaI duaIity.
en.40of100b.info /Moksha   (1243 words)

  
 Hinduism - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
Liberation from this material existence and cycle of birth and death, to join or reach the Universal spirit or God (depending on belief), is known as moksha, which is the ultimate goal of Hindus.
The other principles include the guru/chela dynamic, the Divinity of Word of OM and the power of mantras (religious hymn), manifestations of God's spirit in all forms of existence; that is an understanding that the essential spark of the Divine (Atman/Brahman) is in every living being.
Realisation of the goal of Yoga is known as moksha or samadhi.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/h/i/n/Hinduism.html   (6385 words)

  
 Avatar oddd.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Avatar (disambiguation)] In Hinduism, an avatar or avatara (Sanskrit अवतार), is the incarnation (bodily manifestation) of an Immortal Being, or of the Ultimate Supreme Being.
Liberation from this material existence and cycle of birth and death, to join, reach or develop a relationship with the "universal spirit" (depending on belief), is known as moksha, which is the ultimate goal of Hindus.
The other principles include the guru/chela dynamic, the Divinity of Word of OM and the power of mantras (religious hymn), manifestations of the divine's spirit in all forms of existence (pantheism); that is an understanding that the essential spark of the (Atman/Brahman) is in every living being, the concept that all human beings are divine.
www.oddd.org /en/avatar   (12691 words)

  
 Hinduism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
What can be said to be common to all Hindus is belief in Dharma, reincarnation, karma, and moksha (liberation) of every soul through a variety of moral, action-based, and meditative yogas.
It is seen as one unity, with the lesser gods aspects of the one, like many colors of the same prism, and seen by some as valid to worship.
Many even believe they may be able to bring worshippers closer to Moksha, end of the cycle of rebirth.
uncover.us /en/wikipedia/h/hi/hinduism.html   (4634 words)

  
 Salvation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Moksha is a final release from one's worldly conception of self, the loosening of the shackles of experiential duality and a re-establishment in one's own fundamental nature, though the nature is seen as ineffable and beyond sensation.
In dualist Hinduism, as found mostly in different forms of Vaishnavism, it is union or close association with God.
In Hinduism, moksha occurs when the individual soul (human mind/spirit) or atman recognizes its identity with the Ground of all being - the Source of all phenomenal existence known as Brahman.
www.io.com /~xiombarg/cgi-bin/nph-colorblind.cgi/000100A/http/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvation   (4128 words)

  
 Samsara
Hinduism had many terms for the state of liberation like Moksha, mukti, nirvana, and mahasamadhi.
Moksha may be achieved by love of Ishwar/God (see Bhakti movement), by psycho-physical meditation (Raja Yoga), by discrimination of what is real and unreal through intense contemplation (Jnana Yoga) and through Karma Yoga, the path of selfless action that subverts the ego and enforces understanding of the unity of all.
Advaita Vedanta, which heavily influenced Hindu Yoga, believes that Brahman, the ultimate Truth-Consciousness-Bliss, is the infinite, impersonal reality (as contrasted to the Buddhist concept of shunyata) and that through realization of it, all temporal states like deities, the cosmos and samsara itself are revealed to be nothing but manifestations of Brahman.
www.ufaqs.com /wiki/en/sa/Samsara.htm   (724 words)

  
 YourArt.com >> Encyclopedia >> dharma   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
{{dablinkFor other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation).}} Dharma (Sanskrit धर्म) or Dhamma (Pāli) means Natural Law or Reality, and with respect to its significance for spirituality and religion might be considered the Way of the Higher Truths.
Brahmacharya, Grihastha, Vaanprastha, Sanyaasa, a person also seeks to fulfill the four essentials (purushaartha) of Dharma, Artha (worldly gain}, Kama (sensual pleasures), and Moksha (liberation from reincarnation or rebirth).
Moksha, although the ultimate goal, is emphasized more in the last two stages of life, while Artha and Kama are primary only during Grihasthaashram.
www.yourart.com /research/encyclopedia.cgi?subject=/dharma   (3106 words)

  
 nirvana - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
Siddartha Gautama, the Buddha, described Buddhism as a raft which, after floating across a river, will enable the passenger to reach nirvana.
Hinduism also uses nirvana as a synonym to its ideas of moksha, and it is spoken of in several Hindu tantric texts as well as the Bhagavad Gita.
The Hindu and Buddhist concepts of nirvana should not necessarily be regarded as equivalent.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/Nirvana   (844 words)

  
 > Hinduism at abcworld.net   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
What can be said to be common to all Hindus is belief in Dharma (natural principles), Reincarnation (rebirth), Karma (cause and effect relationship), and Moksha (liberation from earthly matters) of every soul through a variety of moral, action-based, and meditative yogas.
Liberation from this material existance and cycle of birth and death, to join or reach the Universal spirit or God (depending on belief), is known as moksha, which is the ultimate goal of Hindus.
Though all the different paths of Moksha (salvation, liberation) are, to various extents, acknowledged by all denominations, the actual conception of Brahman and his nature is what differentiates them.
abcworld.net /Hinduism.html   (5720 words)

  
 YourArt.com >> Encyclopedia >> hindu   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
A Hindu is one who follows their Sva-Dharma, practices Bhakti (devotion) on any form of God (who is Brahman), practices Karma for the purpose of Moksha.
The doctrines of moksha by the diligent discharge of personal, social and religious duty is the corner stone of the hindu society.
By following one's duty (Swa-Dharma) one gains merit and when the process is completed; a union with the Godhead and cessation of the cycle of birth and death.
www.yourart.com /research/encyclopedia.cgi?subject=/hindu   (3700 words)

  
 This article is about a religious term See Moksha disambiguation...
This article is about a religious term See Moksha disambiguation...
In Hinduism Hinduism and Jainism Jainism, "moksha" (Sanskrit Sanskrit: "liberation") or "mukti" (Sanskrit Sanskrit: "release") refers to liberation from the cycle cycle of death and rebirth rebirth.
It is seen in the Hindu Upanishads Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita Bhagavad Gita, the Yoga Sutras Yoga Sutras, the Hindu Tantra Tantra tradition and other such related streams of Hindu thought.
www.biodatabase.de /Moksha   (402 words)

  
 Jiva peee.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Many traditions hold that human existence is followed by life on other planets with higher life forms and preceded by life on "lower" planets.
Jains believe that the jiva can eventually transcend the miseries of life - often via reincarnation - thus escaping samsara, via moksha.
Hindu beliefs are similar, but differ in the means of achieving moksha and in that the jiva is then believed to reside with God.
jiva.en.peee.org   (272 words)

  
 hinduism - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
Hindus believe that God, in whatever form they prefer, (or as monists prefer to call, "Ishta Devata,", i.e., the preferred form of God) can grant worshippers grace to bring them closer to Moksha, end of the cycle of rebirth.
The great Hindu saint, Ramakrishna, a monist, was a prominent advocate of this traditional Hindu view.
The chief aim of the Vedic religion is to achieve moksha, or liberation, through constant dedication to satya (Truth) and eventual realization of the atman (Universal Soul), held to be achievable by all, whether through meditation or pure love.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/Hinduism   (5366 words)

  
 Moksha Did You Mean moksha   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
An Arhat or a Siddha may inspire, but do not intervene.
The ShivA pURANA mentions that by wearing the Holy Rudraksha bead a person attains Moksha.
Know all about these holy beads in detail on this website.
www.did-you-mean.com /Moksha.html   (848 words)

  
 Tsna (disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tsna River (Moksha basin), a river in Tambov Oblast and Ryazan Oblast, tributary of Moksha River (Oka River basin);
This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title.
If an internal link referred you to this page, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tsna_River   (113 words)

  
 > Pilgrimage at abcworld.net   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
A pilgrimage is a term primarily used in religion and spirituality of a long journey or search of great moral significance.
It is believed that travelling to these places leads to moksha, the release from samsara (cycle of rebirths).
Vrindavan is most important place of pilgrimage for every Vaishnava, especially for the followers of Gaudiya Vaishnavism who regard Krishna as the original Personality of Godhead (God).
abcworld.net /Pilgrimage.html   (1203 words)

  
 Brahman Information - Online Prescription Medication Directory
For other uses of this word and similar words, see Brahman (disambiguation).
Brahman is also not restricted to the usual dimensional perspectives of being, and thus enlightenment, moksha, yoga, samadhi, nirvana, etc. do not merely mean to know Brahman, but to realise one's 'brahman-hood', to actually realise that one is and always was of Brahman nature.
Thus, due to true knowledge, an individual loses the sense of ego (Aham-kara) and achieves liberation, or Moksha.
www.prescriptiondrug-info.com /drug_information_online.asp?title=Brahman   (2271 words)

  
 Sin - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
To perceive the illusions keeping you from connecting with the Divine is the beginning of moksha.
Sin, in Hinduism, besides creating negative karma, is violating moral and ethical codes as in the religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam.
In fact, it is much described in the scriptures that chanting the name of Hari or Narayana or Shiva is the only way to atone for sins, prevent rebirth and attain moksha.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Sin   (5344 words)

  
 Hinduism - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
OM, a sacred syllablle and a quintessential symbol of Hinduism.
Accordingly, many Vaishnavites, for example, believe that only Vishnu can grant the ultimate aim for mankind, moksha.
Bindis are worn by Hindu women on their forehead to symbolize the opening of their spiritual third eye(Nowadays women of other religions too).
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Hinduism   (6509 words)

  
 A Journey To The Truth
What can be said to be common to all Hindus is belief in Dharma(natural principles), Reincarnation, Karma, and Moksha (liberation) of every soul through a variety of moral, action-based, and meditative yogas.
It, like the Upanishads, seeks realisation of the Atman as being nothing other than the infinite Brahman through ethical (mind), physical (body) and meditational (soul) practices of one-pointedness on the 'one supreme truth.' See Yoga for an in-depth look at its history.
The chief aim of the Vedic religion is to achieve moksha, or liberation, through constant dedication to satya (Truth) and eventual realisation of the atman (Universal Soul), held to be achievable by all, whether through meditation or pure love.
www.ajourneytothetruth.com /Hinduism.htm   (6661 words)

  
 This article is about the Hindu religion for other meanings...
What can be said to be common to all Hindus is belief in Dharma Dharma, reincarnation reincarnation, karma karma, and moksha moksha (liberation) of every soul through a variety of moral, action-based, and meditative yoga yogas.
A typical north-west Indian lady wearing a bindi A typical north-west Indian lady wearing a bindi An example of the pervasiveness of this paramount truth-seeking spirituality in daily life is the "bindi" (seen left), which is a common marker for Hindu women.
They are "kama", "artha", "dharma dharma" and "moksha moksha".
www.biodatabase.de /Hinduism   (3692 words)

  
 This article is about a religious term See...
This article is about a religious term See...
A copy of the license is included in the section entitled
Moksha: Aldous Huxley's Classic Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience
www.geodatabase.de /moksha   (365 words)

  
 Priest cwap.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
For other uses of the word, see priest (disambiguation).
A priest or priestess is a person having the authority to perform and administer religious rites.
You may redistribute it,verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the GFDL.
www.cwap.org /en/priest   (1488 words)

  
 GenieLab::Music faith & the muse   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
For other uses, see faith (disambiguation).'' The best starting point, before digging into subjective human associations with the heavily-loaded word, is reviewing the.
This does not explain away all logical contradictions between faiths but these traditions say that all seeming contradictions will be understood once a person has an experience of the Hindu concept of moksha.
What is believed concerning God, in this sense, is at least in principle only as reliable as the evidence and the logic by which faith is supported.
www.genielab.com /artist/110778   (704 words)

  
 Sin - the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Sin, in Hinduism, besides creating negative karma, is violating moral and ethical codes as in the religions of Judaism,Christianity and Islam.
In fact, it is much described in the scriptures that chanting the name of Hari or Narayana or Shiva is theonly way to atone for sins, prevent rebirth and attain moksha.
For reference, see thefamous story of Ajamila, described in astory described in the Bhagavata Purana and described in one website source, [2].
www.world-knowledge-encyclopedia.com /?t=Sin   (2709 words)

  
 Rama - The real meaning from Timesharetalk wikipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
This article is about the incarnation of God Vishnu and king of ancient India, for other meanings see Rama (disambiguation).
Always attentive and accessible to his people, Rama is worshipped and hailed by all - the very symbol of moksha, the ultimate goal and destination of all life, and the best example of perfect character and human conduct, inspiring human beings for countless succeeding ages.
Astronomical data in the Ramayana has been interpreted to suggest that his birth would have been at approximately 7323 BC (in the very early Treta Yuga).
www.timesharetalk.co.uk /wiki.asp?k=Rama   (6869 words)

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