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Topic: Mon-Khmer


    Note: these results are not from the primary (high quality) database.


In the News (Mon 19 Aug 19)

  
 Austroasiatic Languages: Munda and Mon-Khmer
A hypertext grammar of the Mon language, from Aaron Broadwell's fieldwork course at the University of Albany.
www.ling.hawaii.edu /faculty/stampe/aa.html   (391 words)

  
 Cambodia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Khmer language is a member of the Mon-Khmer subfamily of the Austroasiatic language group.
The Khmer Rouge justified its actions by claiming that Cambodia was on the brink of major famine due to the American bombing campaigns, and that this required the evacuation of the cities to the countryside so that people could become self-sufficient, however this claim is generally dismissed as an excuse by many.
Khmer culture is very hierarchical, in that the greater a person's age, the greater the level of respect that must be granted to them.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cambodia   (4417 words)

  
 Euro-Mon Community
Mon is a member of a fairly large but much broken down and scattered family of languages, which extends (in detached fragments) from the extreme west of the Central Provinces of India through Assam and Indo-China right down into the Malay Peninsula.
The kings, both Burmese and Mon, seem to have indulged in a double nomenclature: an elaborate Indian name, sometimes of stupendous length, was used by them as their royal style, though they had shorter native names as well, by which (as a rule) they are known in the histories.
About the middle of that century the Mon area was much reduced by Burmese conquests, culminating in the total annexation of the Mon country to the Burmese kingdom of Pagan and the settlement of Tavoy and Southern Tenasserim by Burmese, who thus cut off the Mon race from their connexion with the more distant south.
www.eumon.org /HistoryOfMonInscription.htm   (4995 words)

  
 Khmer - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Khmer
Traditionally, Khmer society was divided into six groups: the royal family, the Brahmans (who officiated at royal festivals), Buddhist monks, officials, commoners, and slaves.
The Khmer language belongs to the Mon-Khmer family of Austro-Asiatic languages.
The Khmer empire reached its zenith in the 9th-13th centuries, with the building of the capital city and temple complex at Angkor.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Khmer   (232 words)

  
 Mon-Khmer languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Khmer (or Cambodian) in Cambodia, southern Vietnam, and northeastern Thailand (15 to 22 million)
Pearic is a remnant on the Cambodian coast.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mon-Khmer_languages   (108 words)

  
 Khmer/Cambodian alphabet, pronunciation and language
Khmer (Cambodian), a member of the Mon-Khmer group of Austro-Asiatic languages, spoken by about 8 million people in Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, China, France and the USA.
The Khmer alphabet is descended from the Brahmi script of ancient India by way of the Pallava script, which was used in southern India and South East Asia during the 5th and 6th Centuries AD.
The Khmer alphabet closely resembles the Thai and Lao alphabets, which were developed from it.
www.omniglot.com /writing/khmer.htm   (326 words)

  
 Cambodia - LANGUAGES
Khmer belongs to the Mon-Khmer family of the Austroasiatic phylum of languages.
Khmer, in contrast to Vietnamese, Thai, Lao, and Chinese, is nontonal.
Khmer is divided into three stages--Old Khmer (seventh to twelfth century A.D.), Middle Khmer (twelfth to seventeenth century A.D.), and Modern Khmer (seventeenth century to the present).
www.country-data.com /cgi-bin/query/r-2131.html   (479 words)

  
 Khmer Inscription Khmer Language - Cambodia
Generally, the Khmer inscription had its own distinction and the content was mostly a listing of assets, covering from paddy fields, cattle, objects and furniture, as well as the names of slaves which were owned by the temples.
Many literatures and other Khmer manuscripts, being written on unendurable materials other than on stone, are believed to have been lost with time, and some may have been survived until present day as local folklores.
This could lead us to imagine that the Khmers were devout to their gods in whom they revered as their protector, and god's blessing would bring them prosperity.
www.cambodia-travel.com /khmer/inscription.htm   (568 words)

  
 AUSTROASIATISKE SPROG
Østlige mon-khmer sprog (67 sprog) omfatter khmer i Cambodja og andre sprog i Cambodja, Laos og Vietnam.
Moniske sprog (2 sprog) er mon i Burma og nyahkur i Thailand.
www.shubiworld.com /encyclopedia/A/Austroasiatiske_sprog   (249 words)

  
 Austro-Asiatic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Khmer language of Cambodia, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Monic (2 languages) includes the Mon language of Myanmar and the Nyahkur language of Thailand.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Austroasiatic_languages   (402 words)

  
 About Khmer
The Mon and the Khmer peoples moved into Southeast Asia before the Christian era, probably from the north, arriving before their present neighbors—the Vietnamese, Lao, and Thai.
Khmer Rouge remnants, meanwhile, with some support from non-Communists, continued resistance, especially in areas on the Thai border, and they retained Cambodia’s UN seat.
Remnants of the Khmer Rouge and other groups organized the Coalition Government of Democratic Kâmpùchéa in opposition to the Vietnamese-backed regime and were able to retain Cambodia’s seat at the United Nations (UN).
members.tripod.com /sophanara35/about.htm   (3379 words)

  
 KCC: Khmer Cultural Center
Khmer Cultural Center was founded by Mon Duch, Chum Sambath, Chetra Keo, Narin Antoniades, and Sean Theng Ban in 1998.
Khmer Cultural Center is a non-profit community based arts organization rooted in the arts and cultural tradition, and experience of Cambodia.
Our aim is to position Khmer Cultural Center as a national center for Cambodian arts and culture in an effort to advance the Cambodian community and to create an environment for artistic innovations.
www.khmermarket.com /kcc   (118 words)

  
 AsiaFinest Discussion Forum -> Shakta Religion-religion Of Mon-khmer
Also, it is interesting to note that during the Khmer traditional wedding ceremony or ritual, when everything is all said and done, the groom himself is MADE to follow the lead of the Khmer bride.
Mon Khmer of India still have their culture
History says that the Khasis and Jaintias are the only known tribes from North East India who are of Mon Khmer origin having migrated to the Khasi-Jaintia Hills, in Meghalaya, from Cambodia.
www.asiafinest.com /forum/index.php?showtopic=7630   (3985 words)

  
 Mon-Khmer languages --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The Khmer language belongs to the Mon-Khmer family, itself a part of the Austroasiatic stock.
Their language, also called Khmer, belongs to the Mon-Khmer group of Austroasiatic languages (see language, “Kinds of Language”).
More than 200 languages are spoken, many of which belong to three widespread language families—Sino-Tibetan, Mon-Khmer, and Austronesian.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9053296?tocId=9053296   (808 words)

  
 Online Burma Library > Main Library > Languages of Burma > Mon-Khmer Languages (Mon, Wa etc)
Mon is a Mon-Khmer language which is spoken in Burma and Thailand.
This website is an experimental hypertext grammar of the language, written by working with a native speaker of Mon, Min T. Naing, during a linguistics class at the University at Albany.
"This paper will give the picture of Mon language situation in Thailand both spoken and written language from the earliest time to the present day.
www.burmalibrary.org /show.php?cat=401   (149 words)

  
 OHCHR: Khmer () - Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Khmer is the most important member of the Mon-Khmer family of languages.
The Khmers were once a powerful people who dominated much of Southeast Asia from the 9th through the 12th century.
OHCHR: Khmer () - Universal Declaration of Human Rights
www.unhchr.ch /udhr/lang/kmr.htm   (76 words)

  
 Early History of Thailand, The Mon, Khmer and Sukhothai
The Mon embraced Buddhism enthusiastically and conveyed it to the Khmer and the Malay of Tambralinga.
The closely related Mon and Khmer peoples entered Southeast Asia along migration routes from southern China in the ninth century B.C. The Khmer settled in the Mekong River Valley, while the Mon occupied the central plain and northern highlands of modern Thailand and large parts of Burma.
Tai warriors, fleeing the Mongol invaders, reinforced Sukhothai against the Khmer, ensuring its supremacy in the central plain.
motherearthtravel.com /history/thailand/history-3.htm   (1604 words)

  
 http
This event was to prove culturally decisive for the Burmans because the Mon captives included many Theravada Buddhist monks, who converted the Burmans to Theravada Buddhism; Pali replaced Sanskrit as the language of the sacred literature, and the Burmans adopted the Mon alphabet.
The Mon are still centred in southeastern Myanmar, though their numbers are small compared to those of the ethnic Burmans.
Many of the Mon were killed, while others fled to Thailand.
www.mingalaronline.com /websites/Burmese_Kindoms.htm   (3271 words)

  
 KHMER
Die Khmer sind eng verwandt mit den Mon, einem Bergvolk, dessen Reste in Thailand siedeln.
Die Khmer sprechen die Khmer-Sprache, die zur Familie der Mon-Khmer-Sprachen gehört.
Die Khmer sind das Staatsvolk von Kambodscha und stellen mit mehr als 12 Millionen Einwohnern mehr als 85% der Bevölkerung, ca.
www.toonorama.com /encyclopedia/K/Khmer   (168 words)

  
 Thailand - The Khmer
Theravada Buddhists and wet-rice cultivators, the Khmer spoke a language of the Mon-Khmer group and were heirs to a long and complex political and cultural tradition.
If long-term resident Khmer and Khmer refugees were both included, there were perhaps as many as 600,000 to 800,000 Khmer living in Thailand in the 1980s.
Many of the long-resident Khmer were said to speak Thai, sometimes as a first language, and religious and other similarities contributed over time to Thai-Khmer intermarriage and to Khmer assimilation into Thai society.
www.countrystudies.us /thailand/45.htm   (212 words)

  
 Directory - Science: Social Sciences: Linguistics: Languages: Natural: Austro-Asiatic: Mon-Khmer
The Khmer Language  · iweb · cached · Site devoted to the teaching of the Khmer alphabet and to basic notions of Khmer grammar, as well as containing a Khmer phrase book and links to Khmer dictionaries.
Rien Khmer  · cached · A site devoted to the teaching of Khmer, with emphasis on the script, the phonology, and the numerals of the language.
Khmer Inscription and Language  · cached · Illustrated site devoted to early inscriptions in the Khmer language.
www.incywincy.com /default?p=799158   (175 words)

  
 mon son pa : a mon/khmer hides a cloth
When the Mon completes the round he picks up the cloth and beats that player who now runs away around the circle and back to sit down at his own place.
The Mon continues the game and elects to drop the cloth behind any of the next players.
MON SON PA Draw lots the first player to play Mon.
www.thaitravelers.com /childhood/monson/monson.html   (183 words)

  
 VOA News - Khmer Service - Programs and Affiliates
VOA Khmer is broadcast by VOA's 1000 KW medium wave transmitter in Bangkok and by shortwave transmitters from the Philippines.
VOA Khmer broadcasts comprehensive news and feature radio programs about Cambodia, America and the world.
VOA Khmer Service's first broadcast was on August 15, 1955.
www.voanews.com /khmer/programs_and_affiliates.cfm   (249 words)

  
 A selected bibliography of Mon linguistics
Shorto, H.L. A dictionary of the Mon inscriptions from the sixth to the sixteenth centuries.
An acoustical study of the register distinction in Mon.
Remnant of a lost nation and their cognate words to Old Mon Epigraph [sic?].
www.albany.edu /~gb661/monbib.html   (112 words)

  
 CRCL, Bangkok -- Mon-Khmer Writing
Mon and Khmer diverged first, then Burmese came from Mon.
The Mon-Khmer writing systems include Lao, Thai, Burmese (even though the spoken language is in the Tibeto-Burmese group), Khmer, and various minority languages.
The earliest Thai/Lao scripts were derived in the latter part of the 13th century from cursive Khmer writing.
seasrc.th.net /font/alphabet.htm   (229 words)

  
 WallaDB: Mon-Khmer
Vietnam: Residents in the mountain area speak Mon-Khmer.
This is a dialect of Khmer used by Cambodian descendents in the mountains of Viet Nam.
www.walladb.com /language/batch2/lng282.htm   (24 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Funan
Funan, the first of the Khmer kingdoms, founded in the 1st century ad.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_1481566818/Funan.html   (64 words)

  
 Classification of Mon-Khmer languages
The vestages of much more complicated morphology in Khmer (for example) suggest that in ancient time the system was much more elaborated.
www.anu.edu.au /~u9907217/languages/languages.html   (852 words)

  
 Mon-Khmer languages -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article
(The Mon-Khmer language spoken in Cambodia) Khmer (or Cambodian) in (A nation in southeastern Asia; was part of Indochina under French rule until 1946) Cambodia (7 million)
(The Mon-Khmer language spoken by the Mon people) Mon in the lower (Click link for more info and facts about Salween) Salween, (A mountainous republic in southeastern Asia on the Bay of Bengal) Burma (1 million).
Aslian in peninsular (A constitutional monarchy in southeastern Asia on Borneo and the Malay Peninsula; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1957) Malaya, split into three groups, Jahaic, Senoic and Semelaic.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/m/mo/mon-khmer_languages1.htm   (352 words)

  
 Mon-Khmer talen
The article then touches upon the literary history and cultural importance of Mon, Khmer and Vietnamese.
A synopsis is given of Mon-Khmer languages and subgroups and their geographical distribution.
iias.leidenuniv.nl /host/himalaya/abstracts/mkt.html   (80 words)

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