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Topic: Mongol Empire


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  Mongol Empire - Search View - MSN Encarta
Once an enemy’s initial resistance was broken, the Mongols would overrun the territory with a rapidity not to be duplicated until the tank warfare of the 20th century.
By 1279, when the empire reached its largest size, it was made up of four virtually independent khanates: the Yuan dynasty of China in the east, the Jagatai khanate in the center, the Golden Horde in the west, and the Il-Khanid dynasty in the southwest.
The Mongols, who were involved in their own internal quarrels, seemed almost indifferent to the loss of this vast region, and they offered no effective resistance to Zhu’s invasion of the north that year.
encarta.msn.com /text_761571469__1/Mongol_Empire.html   (4706 words)

  
  Mongol Empire - MSN Encarta
Introduction; Establishment of the Empire by Genghis Khan; Empire of Kublai Khan; Empire of Jagatai; Empire of Il-Khan; Empire of the Golden Horde; Strengths and Weaknesses of the Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire, area ruled by the great Mongol khans in the 13th and 14th centuries; uniting almost all of western and eastern Asia, it was one of the largest land empires in history.
The original homeland of the Mongols, situated in the eastern zone of the Asian steppe, was bounded by the Khingan Mountains on the east, the Altai and Tian mountains on the west, the Shilka River and the mountain ranges by Lake Baikal on the north, and the Great Wall of China on the south.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761571469/Mongol_Empire.html   (1000 words)

  
 Mongol Empire - MSN Encarta
In 1161 the Mongol chieftain Kutula was defeated by the Jin in alliance with the Tatars.
He then led a series of military campaigns in which he managed to defeat all the Mongol and Tatar tribes between the Altay Mountains in the west and the Hinggan Mountains in the east (roughly the area of present-day Mongolia).
In 1206 Temujin convened a kuriltai of all the Mongol chieftains.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761571469/Mongol_Empire.html   (986 words)

  
 MONGOL EMPIRE,
The original homeland of the Mongols, situated in the eastern zone of the Asian steppe, was bounded by the Hinggan Mountains on the east, the Altai and Tien Shan mountains on the west, the Shilka River and the mountain ranges by Lake Baykal on the north, and the Great Wall of China on the south.
Upon the division of the Mongol Empire at Genghis’s death (1227), the khanate of Turkestan was ruled by Jagatai (d.
In political life, the Mongols in China followed the sociopolitical teachings of Confucianism, stressing the universality of the ruler’s authority; those in western Asia became absorbed in the confused politics and warfare of eastern Europe and the Middle East.
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=216727   (1907 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Mongol Empire
The Mongol Empire was founded by Genghis Khan in 1206, and at its height, it encompassed the majority of the territories from East Asia to Eastern Europe.
The disintegration of the Mongol Empire led to the collapse of the Silk Road's political unity.
It is estimated that between one-quarter and two-thirds of the of Europe's population died from the outbreak of the plague between 1348 and 1350.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Mongol_Empire   (0 words)

  
 Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire was governed by a specific laws created by Genghis Khan, which is called Yasa and the stiff penalty that resulted from breaking Yasa made Mongol Empire one of the safest and the most effective institution that the Mongols never imagined to be.
All throughout the empire, an extensive postal system and trade routes (Yam) were revived and created, which was used by many merchants, messengers and travellers from China, Middle East and Europe to have cultural exchange and a safer trade network on all sides.
The Mongol Empire, as stated in Yasa, had religious tolerance and an extremely clear rule of governance in which the great Khan was in direct administration of the Empire.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/m/mo/mongol_empire.html   (845 words)

  
 World History - The Mongols - Women of the Mongol Court
The most important accomplishment of Chinggis Khan was uniting the Mongols not so much by conquest but by bringing together Mongols who were scattered throughout the country in the desert of the south, in the steppe lands of Central Mongolia, and in the forested and mountainous regions along the northern frontier.
European missionaries who visited the Mongols in the middle of the 13th century remarked that she was the most renowned of the Mongols.
Although she was a Nestorian Christian, she recognized that if the Mongols were to administer this vast empire that they had subjugated, that one of the ways of doing so was to ingratiate themselves to the clergy of these various religions.
www.woodrow.org /teachers/world-history/teaching/mongol/women.html   (2037 words)

  
 Mongolia Web News - The Mongol Empire
The Mongol Empire was founded by Genghis Khan in 1206, and at its height, it encompassed the majority of the territories from East Asia to Central Europe.
Mongols prized their commercial and trade relationships with neighboring economies and this policy they continued during the process of their conquests and during the expansion of their empire.
It is estimated that between one-quarter and two-thirds of the of Europe's population died from the outbreak of the plague between 1348 and 1350.
www.mongolia-web.com /content/view/1139/39   (4792 words)

  
 Mongols at AllExperts
The Mongols were originally a confederation of tribes in competition with the Tatar Turks, Kerait, Merkit and Naiman confederations and therefore only one division of what is known today as the Mongol nation.
Mongols were originally shamans who pray to the supernatural God they believed existed beyond the sky and look down from the heavens.
The Mongols and Genghis Khan maintained a policy of being open to all religions, it was known as particularly sympathetic to Christians (which may have helped contribute to the legend of Prester John).
en.allexperts.com /e/m/mo/mongols.htm   (4491 words)

  
 Mongol Empire | Encyclopedia of Modern Asia
Mongol military strength was based on the extraordinary mobility of their horsemen, tight military discipline, excellent communications, and the ruthlessness and superior leadership of Genghis Khan and others.
Mongols armies attacked Khorezm in 1219 and took a terrible revenge for the diplomatic incident, systematically destroying the kingdom's cities and massacring their inhabitants.
Mongol generals were willing to recruit troops from among subject peoples, especially the Turkic peoples of Central Asia, and to learn new techniques from their enemies.
www.bookrags.com /research/mongol-empire-ema-04   (1442 words)

  
 The Mongol Empire - All Empires
The Empire at the ascension of Ogedei Khan
Today the Mongols and their great leaders are sometimes remembered in two different: as valiant heroes who conquered vast lands against all odds to build a mighty empire or as ruthless conquerors who destroyed everything in their path.
Being an army of entirely cavalry, the Mongols could easily dictate the positional flow of the battle, particularly feigned retreats, which could easily fool an enemy into a foolish charge, and encirclement, which is difficult for the enemy to uphold due to the speed and cavalry strength of the Mongols.
www.allempires.com /article/index.php?q=The_Mongol_Empire   (7323 words)

  
 Brief History of the Mongol Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Mongol Empire was born in the valley of the Orkhon River (north central Mongolia), the area chosen by Jenghiz Khan (often Ghenghiz) for the Mongol capital, Karakorum (ca1220).
The Mongols dispersed a hastily formed army of Poles and Germans at Liegnitz in Silesia, but this encounter must have shown the Mongols that they were treading slippery ground and they did not proceed westward but swiveled south and crossed the Danube not far from Vienna.
During the heyday of empire, they were sympathetic to Nestorian Christianity and the Crusaders were distantly sympathetic to them, but when push came to shove the Crusaders did not seem especially welcoming in their Levantine fortresses when the Mongols rode against the Mamelukes, who contained them near Damascus in 1303.
www.worldhistoryplus.com /history/m/Mongol_empire_thebrief.htm   (1794 words)

  
 Finnish Honorary Consulate of Mongolia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Mongol Empire reached its greatest territorial extent in the 13th century, encompassing most of Asia and extending westward to the Eastern Europe.
The Mongol Empire expanded to comprise northern China, Turkestan, Middle East, Russia, Ukraine, Caucasus and Iran.
The Mongol Empire existed for almost 150 years, up to the end of the 14th century.
www.mongolia.fi /eng/history_10.html   (155 words)

  
 The Infography about the Mongol Empire
From Saladin to the Mongols: The Ayyubids of Damascus, 1193 to 1260.
Muscovy and the Mongols: Cross-Cultural Influences on the Steppe Frontier, 1304-1589.
"Mongol and Nomadic Taxation." HJAS 30 (1970): 46-85.
www.infography.com /content/588040745159.html   (2310 words)

  
 Unique Facts about Asia: Mongol Empire
The rapid expansion of the Mongol Empire was possible as a result of military skill, brilliant political and economic organization, and discipline.
At the time of Genghis Khan's death in 1227, the empire was divided among his four sons with his third son as the nominal supreme Khan, but by the 1350s, the khanates were in a state of fracture and had lost the organization of Genghis Khan.
Mongol armies pushed into Persia, finished off the Xia and the remnants of the Khwarezmids, and came into conflict with the Song Dynasty of China, starting a war that would last until 1279 and that would conclude with the Mongols' successful conquest of China.
www.sheppardsoftware.com /Asiaweb/factfile/Unique-facts-Asia7.htm   (1424 words)

  
 Mongol Empire - Art History Online Reference and Guide
The empire was governed by a parliamentary-style central administration called Kurultai in which the Mongol chiefs met with the Great Khan to discuss domestic and foreign policies.
Mongol armies pushed into Persia, finished off the Xia and the remnants of the Khwarezmids, and came into conflict with the Song Dynasty of China, starting a war that would last until 1279 and that would conclude with the Mongols' successful conquest of China.
Tamerlane tried to unify the Mongol Empire, but the identity of the empire transpired to the lesser Mongol khanates, and the unification of all the tribes of Mongolia, which made possible the emergence of a Mongol nation and culture.
www.arthistoryclub.com /art_history/Mongol_Empire   (2557 words)

  
 Ancient China: The Mongolian Empire: The Yuan Dynasty, 1279-1368
The Mongols were in fact a group of disunified tribes that would gather regularly during annual migrations; although they elected chiefs over the tribes at these meetings, they never unified into a single people.
The Mongolian Empire was perhaps the largest empire in human history in terms of geographical expanse.
Because the Mongols held Confucianism in contempt in the early years of their rule, the new philosophy of Neo-Confucians, founded in the last century of Sung rule, took hold in China and eventually eclipsed the older forms of Confucianism.
www.wsu.edu /~dee/CHEMPIRE/YUAN.HTM   (1668 words)

  
 Mongol Empire, biggest land empire in history
Mongol Empire was the biggest land empire in history.
Mongol warriors fought unsuccessfully at sea and in the tropical climate of Southeast Asia.
These smaller empires were the Golden Horde on the steppes of southern Russia and the Balkans, the Mongolian-Chinese Yuan Empire, and the realm of the Ilkhans in western Asia.
franklaughter.tripod.com /cgi-bin/histprof/misc/mongol.html   (1369 words)

  
 The Mongol Empire
Handout 1: Map of the Mongol Empire in late 13th Century.
These lessons will begin with how the Mongols were able to establish the largest contiguous land empire in world history and then proceed to discuss the enduring significance of the Mongol conquests.
List the modern names of the countries which were included in the Mongol Empire at the end of the 13th century.
www.globaled.org /nyworld/materials/mongol/Howdid.html   (658 words)

  
 Mongols: Introduction
Most of the world's empires are pre-modern; the Persian Empire from the sixth to the fourth century B.C.E., Alexander's Empire, the Roman, the Byzantine, the Mughal Empire in India, the Ottoman, and a series of Chinese empires, among others.
Although the term Pax Mongolica is an oversimplification, the cosmopolitan nature of the Mongol Empire contributed to the stability of overland connections and trade routes.
Essays in The Mongol Empire section examine the foundation and expansion of the empire, the Mongol military, Mongol society, and the impact of the empire on trade networks.
www.accd.edu /sac/history/keller/Mongols/intro.html   (476 words)

  
 Mongol Empire
Under the leadership of Genghis Khan and his successors, they established an empire that reached from what is now China and Korea in the east to Eastern Europe and the shores of the Mediterranean Sea in the west.
Between 1206 and 1227, when Genghis Khan died, the Mongols conquered a dominion that stretched from the China Sea to the Caspian.
The Mongol Empire created by Genghis Khan was not a unified state but a vast collection of territories held together by military force.
members.tripod.com /improvized   (926 words)

  
 History of the Mongol Empire
In the lifetime of one man, the Mongol dominions grew from a malestorm of warring clans to an Empire stretching from the Yellow Sea to the Caspian Sea.
After the death of is founder, Genghis Khan, the Mongols succeeded in what the empires of Alexander and Attila failed: it continued to expand.
However, the Mongol Empire did not come about without bloodshed; and thus their apparent brutality and destructiveness has never been forgotten.
mongolempire.4t.com   (255 words)

  
 Mongolia Travel Guide - Mongolia's Population and Ethnic Groups
Thus, Mongolia is to be viewed as the hearth of the Mongolian race, spreading worldwide Mongols who comprise one single family developed from a common ethnic origin.
After the Mongol Empire's capital Kharakhorum was abandoned, Urguu city was founded in 1639 for the first religious leader of the Mongols, Bogd Zanabazar, by the Khalkh nobility.
The capital city of Khuree of Bogd Khaan's Mongolia was set up as a result of the struggle for Mongolian independence and national freedom, by the first Great State Khural held in 1924, when it was given the legal status of capital city of the Mongolian People's Republic and was renamed Ulaanbaatar city.
www.ub-mongolia.mn /facts-for-the-visitors/about-mongolia/mongolia's-population-and-ethnic-groups.html   (0 words)

  
 The Mongol Empire: Establishing a powerful Empire through Conquest free essay, term paper and book report
The Mongol Empire: Establishing a powerful Empire through Conquest The formation of a strong and powerful empire was the main achievement that dynasties of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries strived towards.
Empires which had achieved such a powerful state were able to develop and control the economic development of smaller empires.
The Mongol empire was one of the most spectacular examples of a nation rising in power due to their conquests in......
www.freeessays123.com /essay6978/mongolempireestablishinga.html   (458 words)

  
 Mongols
The Mongols were originally a confederation of tribes in competition with the Tatar Turks, Kerait, Merkit and Naiman confederations and therefore only one division of what is known today as the Mongol nation.
Mongols were originally shamans who pray to the supernatural God they believed existed beyond the sky and look down from the heavens.
The Mongols and Genghis Khan maintained a policy of being open to all religions, it was known as particularly sympathetic to Christians (which may have helped contribute to the legend of Prester John).
articles.gourt.com /en/Mongol   (4371 words)

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