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Topic: Mongolian alphabet


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In the News (Mon 20 Nov 17)

  
  OHCHR: Mongolian (Khalkha) - Universal Declaration of Human Rights   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Mongolian belongs to the Mongolian branch of the Altaic family of languages.
Standard Mongolian is often referred to as "Khalkha" to distinguish it from a number of related languages and dialects.
The original Mongolian alphabet was adapted from that of the Uyghurs in the 13th century.
www.unhchr.ch /udhr/lang/khk.htm   (192 words)

  
  Mongolian language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mongolian (Монгол), is the best-known member of the Mongolian language family, and the primary language of most of the residents of Mongolia.
The official Mongolian alphabet was created in the 12th century, although it has undergone transformations and occasionally been supplanted by other scripts.
The Mongolian alphabet was used in Mongolia until 1943, when it was replaced by the Cyrillic alphabet, and Cyrillic is still the most common script found in Mongolia, while the traditional alphabet is being slowly reintroduced in the public school system.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mongolian_language   (877 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Mongolian alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Intermediate between these is the Mongolian script proper, which was derived in the 12th-13th centuries from the Uyghur alphabet, a descendant of Sogdian alphabet that came from Syriac alphabet.
The Sogdian alphabet is derived from Syriac, the descendant script of Aramaic alphabet.
Besides the Mongolian language, the Evenk language is written in the Mongolian script.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Mongolian-alphabet   (1145 words)

  
 [Mongolian alphabet] | [All the best Mongolian alphabet resources at karaoke.velocityincome.com]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Besides the Mongolian language, the Evenk language in China is written in the Mongolian script.
The traditional Mongolian alphabet is not a perfect fit for the Mongolian language, and it would be impractical to extend it to a language with a very different phonology like Chinese.
It is a phonemic alphabet, meaning that there is a high level of consistency in the representation of individual sounds.
karaoke.velocityincome.com /Mongolian_alphabet   (1268 words)

  
 Cyrillic alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The plan of the alphabet is derived from the early Cyrillic alphabet, itself a derivative of the Glagolitic alphabet, a 9th century uncial cursive usually credited to two brothers, Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius.
Though the alphabet is usually attributed to Saint Clement of Ohrid, a Bulgarian scholar and disciple of Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius, the alphabet is more likely to have developed at the Preslav Literary School in northeastern Bulgaria, where the oldest Cyrillic inscriptions (dating back to the 940s) have been found.
The theory is further supported by the fact that the Cyrillic alphabet replaced almost completely the Glagolitic one in northeastern Bulgaria as early as the end of the 10th century, whereas the Ohrid Literary School—where Saint Clement worked—continued to use the Glagolitic alphabet until the 12th century.
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Cyrillic_alphabet   (2649 words)

  
 Mongolian alphabets, pronunciation and language
Mongolian is an Altaic language spoken by approximately 5 million people in Mongolia, China, Afghanistan and Russia.
Between the 13th and 15th Centuries, Mongolian was also written with Chinese characters, the Arabic alphabet and a script derived from Tibetan called Phags-pa.
As a result of pressure from the Soviet Union, Mongolia adopted the Latin alphabet in 1931 and the Cyrillic alphabet in 1937.
www.omniglot.com /writing/mongolian.htm   (503 words)

  
 Country Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Mongolian is the language of most of the population of the Mongolia and also of Inner Mongolia (Nei Mongol) and of separate groups living in several other provinces of the People's Republic of China.
The Mongolian languages, belonging to the same group of the Altaic language family, are all agglutinative.
Consequently, the vocabulary of the Mongolian language has become richer through word formation in the native language, through the modification and expansion of the meaning of words, and through the borrowing of words and expressions of ancient Greek and Latin origin via Russian.
www.mongolia.org.hk /country_info-1-12.htm   (2539 words)

  
 Mongolian alphabet
The Mongolian language historically has four writing systems that were used over the centuries.
Two writing systems based on simplified Chinese ideograms and Sinogram-typed alphabetic block (see Hangul), respectively, were used to write the Mongolic language of Khitan, also used to write the Tungusic Jurchen language in their modified forms.
Intermediate between these is the Mongolian script proper, in 12-13 centuries derived from the Uighur alphabet, descendant of Sogdian alphabet which came from Syriac alphabet.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/m/mo/mongolian_alphabet.html   (356 words)

  
 Mongolian Translation - Translate Mongolian Language Translator
The best-known member of this language family, Mongolian is the primary language of most of the residents of Mongolia.
The official Mongolian alphabet was created in the 12th century, although it has undergone transformations and occasionally been supplanted by other scripts since then.
The Mongolian alphabet had been used in Mongolia until 1943, when it switched to the Cyrillic alphabet, and Cyrillic is still the most common script found in Mongolia today, while the traditional alphabet is currently being slowly reintroduced in the public school system.
www.translation-services-usa.com /languages/mongolian.shtml   (385 words)

  
 Writing Mongol in Uighur Script
While in these areas, where the alphabet was maintained for scholarly and anachronistic interest, there has been a recent revival of its regular use and instruction in regular school curriculum, it has remained in constant use in Chinese controlled Inner Mongolia.
This is a script alphabet, which means the pen should write a continuous line, for the most part, from the beginning to the end of the word.
The longevity of this alphabet despite so many attempts at change, is a combination of the Mongol sense of tradition as well as that so few other alphabets can compete with Uighur Script on its ease of use.
www.viahistoria.com /SilverHorde/research/UighurScript.html   (3677 words)

  
 Period Mongolian Names   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Ancient Mongolian was characterized by an intervolic consonant "g" (pronounced gh in English) proceeding a long vowel and a vocalized "h" proceeding an opening vowel.
Middle Mongolian was characterized by the replacing of the intervolic consonant before the long vowel with something similar to a glottal stop and the retention of the vocalized "h".
The language used to write Mongolian in period is an 11th or 13th century dialect that kept the intervolic "g" of Ancient and Middle Mongolian, but dropped the vocalized "h" proceeding opening vowels.
www.s-gabriel.org /names/baras-aghur/mongolian.html   (2320 words)

  
 [No title]
Mongolian is the language of most of the population of Mongolia and also of Inner Mongolia and of separate groups living in several other provinces and regions of China and the Russian Federation.
The middle period of the development of Mongolian extended from the seventh and eighth to the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.
In official documents it is stated that the reason for the change from the Mongolian script to the new form of writing was twohold: (1) there was a great gap between the written and spoken languages, and (2) the Mongolian script was not suitable for the assimilation of foreign words.
www.indiana.edu /~mongsoc/mong/language.htm   (1204 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The recent Cyrillic-based alphabet is a phonetic representation of a modern dialect and does not correspond cleanly with the traditional script.
This alphabet could be regarded an approximation to the phonetic repertoire of classical Mongolian, or from a modern perspective it could be regarded as a somewhat arbitrary collection of elements.
Because the relationship between alphabetic letters and their rendition into glyphs is complex, often many-to-many, there are several cases where the choice of underlying spelling needs to be made clear.
www.unicode.org /Public/TEXT/UTR-2.TXT   (3935 words)

  
 Mongolian - OLPCWiki
The Mongolian alphabet was used in Mongolia until 1931, when it was replaced by the Latin alphabet, and again by Cyrillic in 1937.
The traditional alphabet was abolished completely by the pro-Soviet government in 1941, and a short-lived attempt to reintroduce the traditional alphabet after 1990 was abolished after some years.
In the People's Republic of China, the Mongolian language is a co-official language with Mandarin Chinese in some regions.
wiki.laptop.org /go/Mongolian   (174 words)

  
 Definition of Mongolian alphabet
Two writing systems based on simplified Chinese ideograms and Sinogram-typed alphabetic block (see Hangul), respectively, were used to write the Mongolic language of Khitan, and also to write the Tungusic Jurchen language in their modified forms.
Intermediate between these is the Mongolian script proper, which was derived in the 12th-13th centuries from the Uighur alphabet, a descendant of Sogdian alphabet which came from Syriac alphabet.
This alphabet is a phonemic alphabet, meaning that there is a high level of consistency in the representation of individual sounds.
www.wordiq.com /definition/Mongolian_alphabet   (403 words)

  
 Edge Translation
Mongolian is a member of the Mongolic language family.
The Mongolian alphabet was used until 1931 when it was replaced by the Latin alphabet.
Then in 1937 the Latin alphabet was replaced by the Cyrillic alphabet.
www.edgetranslation.net /mongolian1.htm   (179 words)

  
 Writing Mongolian
The 26 characters of the Uighur alphabet, based on an Aramaic alphabet originally taken from a northern Semitic alphabet, are used to write words vertically from top to bottom and from left to right across the page.
Mongolians used a modified set of some 500 characters from Early Mandarin Chinese to render the proper pronunciation of words.
Mongolian can be transliterated using the Roman alphabet, but Cyrillic gives a much better representation of Mongolian sounds than the paltry 26 of the Roman alphabet.
www.koreanhistoryproject.org /Jta/Mo/MoLAN1.htm   (869 words)

  
 JAARS Museum of the Alphabet: Mongolian Alphabet Makers
JAARS Museum of the Alphabet: Mongolian Alphabet Makers
The Mongolian alphabet was the work of three Tibetan lamas:
Sa Skya made the adaptation from the central Asian Uighur alphabet in A.D. Phags-Pa made an adaptation from the Indic Tibetan alphabet for Kublai Khan, in A.D. Tsordji-Osir combined the features of both the Uighur and Tibetan alphabets, in A.D. to successfully represent Mongolian speech.
www.jaars.com /museum/alphabet/people/mongolian.htm   (90 words)

  
 Mongolian Translation Services - Translators English/Mongolian
Mongolian is the best-known member of the Mongolic language family which is a group of languages spoken in Central Asia.
Although it has undergone modifications and has even been been supplanted by other scripts for periods of time, the original Mongolian alphabet can be traced all the way back to the twelfth century and was used by Mongolians until the early 1940s, when it was replaced by the more popular Cyrillic alphabet.
Languages that are related to Mongolian include Buryat of East Siberia, Kalmyk spoken in the Caspian Sea region as well as a number of smaller languages in the Moghol of Afghanistan and China.
www.greentranslations.com /mongolian-translation.html   (251 words)

  
 JAARS Museum of the Alphabet
The Mongolian alphabet is a central Asian derivative of the Aramaic alphabet with influences from Indic-Tibetan.
However, the Russian Cyrillic script was decreed the official alphabet of the former in 1950 and is used to teach reading and writing in the latter.
The Mongolian alphabet was the work of three Tibetan lamas: Sa Skya, Phags-Pa, and Tsordji-Osir.
www.jaars.org /museum/alphabet/galleries/mongolian.htm   (171 words)

  
 Translating Social Change
Mongolian is an Altaic language, belonging to the Mongoloid branch of this generic family of languages, which also includes a variety of middle-Asian languages, among them Turkic and Tungusic languages as well as other Mongoloid tongues.
The Mongolian Cyrillic alphabet is very similar to that utilized for modern Russian, with the exception that it contains two additional characters to produce the “ö” and “ü” vowel sounds of Mongolian, which are representative of the female variants of the long “o” and “u” sounds in the language.
Mongolian grammar is not extremely complicated but follows a subject-object-predicate structure that can be confusing to English-speakers who are learning the language, unless they have prior experience with other languages that make use of similar structure, such as Turkish.
www.accurapid.com /journal/04mongol.htm   (2413 words)

  
 Learn Mongolian Language - Free Conversational Mongolian Lessons Online - Common Mongolian Words and Phrases   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The key is to immerse yourself in the language and use it as often as possible in order to build up your skills of speaking it and listening to it, understanding and comprehending it...
The Phrasebase website is the ultimate environment allowing you to read an Mongolian Alphabet based phonetic spelling of common and useful everyday phrases in effort to memorize it and it's meaning.
Mongolian Language Exchange Pen-Pals - Community of people from around the world interested in teaching you their language and sharing their culture with you.
www.phrasebase.com /learn/mongolian.php   (1872 words)

  
 Cyrillic alphabet biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The Cyrillic alphabet is an alphabet used to write six natural Slavic languages (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian, and Ukrainian) and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe.
Though the alphabet is usually attributed to Saint Climent of Ohrid, a Bulgarian scholar and disciple of Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius, the alphabet is more likely to have developed at the Preslav Literary School in northeastern Bulgaria, where the oldest Cyrillic inscriptions (dating back to the 940s) have been found.
The theory is further supported by the fact that the Cyrillic alphabet replaced almost completely the Glagolitic one in northeastern Bulgaria as early as the end of the 10th century, whereas the Ohrid Literary School—where Saint Climent worked—continued to use the Glagolitic alphabet until the 12th century.
cyrillic.biography.ms   (2110 words)

  
 Teacher Discussion Forums :: View topic - Is Chinese related to Turkish?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The best-known member of this language family, Mongolian is the primary language of most of the residents of Mongolia.
The official Mongolian alphabet was created in the 12th century, although it has undergone transformations and occasionally been supplanted by other scripts since then.
The Mongolian alphabet had been used in Mongolia until 1943, when it switched to the Cyrillic alphabet, and Cyrillic is still the most common script found in Mongolia today, while the traditional alphabet is currently being slowly reintroduced in the public school system.
www.eslcafe.com /forums/teacher/viewtopic.php?t=1730   (606 words)

  
 Cyrillic alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The Cyrillic alphabet''' (or '''azbuka, from the old name of the first letters) is an alphabet used to write six natural Slavic languages (Belarusian languageBelarusian, Bulgarian languageBulgarian, Macedonian languageMacedonian, Russian languageRussian, Serbian languageSerbian, and Ukrainian languageUkrainian) and Languages_using_Cyrillicmany other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe/.
The theory is further supported by the fact that the Cyrillic alphabet replaced almost completely the Glagolitic alphabetGlagolitic one in northeastern Bulgaria as early as the end of the 10th century, whereas the Ohrid Literary School—where Saint Clement of OhridClement worked—continued to use the Glagolitic alphabet until the 12th century/.
Unlike the Latin alphabet, which is usually adapted to different languages using additions to existing letters such as accents, umlauts, tildes and cedillas, the Cyrillic alphabet is usually adapted by the creation of entirely new letter shapes.
www.infothis.com /find/Cyrillic_alphabet   (3447 words)

  
 The U of MT -- Mansfield Library LangFing Altaic
Mongolian was the language of the great Mongol Empire established by Genghis Khan in the 13th century.
Mongolian is spoken in the Mongolian People's Republic (the area traditionally known as Outer Mongolia) and in China.
The original Mongolian alphabet was adapted from that of the Uigur people in the 13th century; it was modified from the Nestorian Syriac script by a lama named Saja Pandita at the request of Kublai Khan.
www.lib.umt.edu /guide/lang/altaiclh.htm   (2024 words)

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