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Topic: Motorola 6809


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In the News (Mon 24 Jun 19)

  
  Motorola 6809 microprocessor family
Motorola 6809 (MC6809) is an enhanced version of the 6800 microprocessor.
The 6809 is not object-code compatible with the 6800, but it is source-code compatible.
The Motorola 6809 was produced in two versions - with on-chip clock (6809) and with external clock input (6809E).
www.cpu-world.com /CPUs/6809   (172 words)

  
  SoftLookup.com - Software titles for Frank Vorstenbosch
is an assembler for Motorola 6800, 6801, 6802, and 6803 microprocessors.
is an assembler for the Motorola 6805 microprocessor.
is an assembler for the Motorola 6809 and Hitachi 6309 microprocessors.
www.softlookup.com /author.asp?ID=3777   (138 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Motorola 6809 Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The 6809 was a major advance over both its predecessors, the in-house Motorola 6800 and the latter's near clone the MOS Technology 6502.
The 6809 was source-compatible with the 6800, even though the 6800 had 78 instructions and the 6809 only had 59.
The optimisation of the 6809 processor meant that, unlike many processors of the day, the instructions were mostly hardwired into the processor (a common trait of the RISC CPUs not prevalent until the 1990s), rather than written using microcode (a typical CISC trait).
www.ipedia.com /motorola_6809.html   (753 words)

  
  Motorola 6809
The 6809 was a major advance over both its predecessor, the Motorola 6800 and also over the MOS Technologies 6502.
The 6809 was source compatible[?] with the 6800, even though the 6800 had 78 instructions and the 6809 only had 59.
The optimisation of the 6809 processor meant that, unlike many processors of the day, the instructions were mostly hardwired into the processor, rather than written using microcode.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/68/6809.html   (543 words)

  
 Motorola 6809
The 6809 was a major advance over both its predecessors, the in-house Motorola 6800 and the latter's near clone the MOS Technology 6502.
Among the significant enhancements the 6809 introduced over its predecessors was the employment of two 8-bit accumulators (rather than one in the 6502), which could be combined into a single 16-bit register.
The optimisation of the 6809 processor meant that, unlike many processors of the day, the instructions were mostly hardwired into the processor (a common trait of the RISC CPUs not prevalent until the 1990s), rather than written using microcode (a typical CISC trait).
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/m/mo/motorola_6809.html   (693 words)

  
 Motorola 6809 - Computing Reference - eLook.org
The 6809 was a major advance over both its predecessor, the Motorola 6800 and also over the 6502.
The 6809 was source compatible with the 6800, even though the 6800 had 78 instructions and the 6809 only had around 59 (including a SEX instruction).
The 6809 was used in the UK "Dragon 32" personal computer and was followed by the Motorola 68000.
www.elook.org /computing/motorola-6809.htm   (204 words)

  
 The Dragon 32/64 Computers
Illegal 6809 Op-codes: an article written for Dragon Update, mostly about the "illegal" uses of the TFR and EXG instructions.
6809 Pinout and instruction set (local copy of a document by Jonathan Bowen).
Note: The 6309 is a version of the 6809 created by Hitachi, and includes more instructions, extra registers and a native, faster, execution mode.
www.6809.org.uk /dragon   (625 words)

  
 Motorola 6809 from FOLDOC
The 6809 was a major advance over both its predecessor, the Motorola 6800 and also over the 6502.
The 6809 was source compatible with the 6800, even though the 6800 had 78 instructions and the 6809 only had around 59 (including a SEX instruction).
The 6809 was used in the UK "Dragon 32" personal computer and was followed by the Motorola 68000.
ftp.sunet.se /foldoc/foldoc.cgi?MC6809   (226 words)

  
 Definition of Motorola 6809
The 6809 was a major advance over both its predecessors, the in-house Motorola 6800 and the latter's near clone the MOS Technology 6502.
The 6809 was source-compatible with the 6800, even though the 6800 had 78 instructions and the 6809 only had 59.
The optimisation of the 6809 processor meant that, unlike many processors of the day, the instructions were mostly hardwired into the processor (a common trait of the RISC CPUs not prevalent until the 1990s), rather than written using microcode (a typical CISC trait).
www.wordiq.com /definition/Motorola_6809   (762 words)

  
 Motorola 6809
The Motorola 6809 processor can normally only access 64 kilobytes of memory, since addresses are limited to 16 bits.
The Motorola 6809 is an 8-bit (arguably, an 8/16-bit) microprocessor CPU from Motorola, introduced circa 1979.
CamelForth for the Motorola 6809 is copyright (c) 1995 Bradford J. Rodriguez.
www.lycos.com /info/motorola-6809.html   (493 words)

  
 GCC6809 - C compiler for the 6809 processor
GCC6809 is a port of the free GCC C compiler to the 6809 processor.
Historically, the 6809 was an important processor whose design influenced later processors and which was used in many different applications.
I found all of the various 6809 bits that were floating around the 'net, began updating them to the latest GCC versions, fixing bugs, and improving performance.
www.oddchange.com /gcc6809   (1079 words)

  
 cpu-collection.de >> Motorola >> 6809
The 6809 is the third generation addition to the 6800 familiy, in competition to Intel 8088.
The 6809 was used in the 'Dragon' series computers in the mid 80s.
The 6809 wasn't based upon the 6800 it was a from-the-ground-up new design.
www.cpu-collection.de /?tn=0&l0=co&l1=Motorola&l2=6809   (156 words)

  
 Motorola 6809
The 6809 is an 8-bit microprocessor from Motorola, circa 1982.
The 6809 was a major advance over both its predecessors, the in-house Motorola 6800 and this one's near clone the MOS Technologies 6502.
The 6809 was source-compatible with the 6800, even though the 6800 had 78 instructions and the 6809 only had 59.
www.fact-index.com /m/mo/motorola_6809.html   (572 words)

  
 An Overview of Micros   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The 6809 was a 16-bit processor, but had a data path of only 8 bits.
Like the Motorola 6809, this device processed data internally using 16 bits, but only had a data path that was 8-bits wide.
Motorola joined the list of 32-bit microprocessor manufacturers with the release of the 68020, which could access 4 gigabytes of RAM.
telecom.tbi.net /comphis.html   (1380 words)

  
 6809 Emulation Page.
This page have been made to give general information about Motorola's 6809 and Hitachi's 6309 mikroprosessors: instructions, emulators, tools, debuggers, disassemblers and assemblers.
This code is free to distribute and use in unmodified form for your own projects requiring a 6809 emulator.
There is currently one emu author using my 6809 and he is quite pleased with the performance and reliability; he told me that it was able to run 20 CPU's in parallel, and still run at full speed on his machine.
koti.mbnet.fi /~atjs/mc6809   (698 words)

  
 Great Microprocessors of the Past and Present
The 6809 was source compatible with the 6800, even though the 6800 had 78 instructions and the 6809 only had around 59.
The Motorola 88000 (originally named the 78000) is a 32 bit processor, one of the first load-store CPUs based on a Harvard architecture (the same as the Fairchild/Intergraph Clipper C100 (1986) beat it by 2 years).
IBM, Motorola, and Apple formed a coalition (around 1992) to produce a microprocessor version of the POWER design as a successor to both the Motorola 68000 and Intel 80x86, resulting in the PowerPC.
www.unixhub.com /docs/misc/cpu.html   (16707 words)

  
 The Great CPU List, Section One   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Like the 6502, the 6809 was based on the Motorola 6800 (August 1974), though the 6809 expanded the design significantly.
The 6809 was source compatible with the 6800, even though the 6800 had 78 instructions and the 6809 only had around 59.
Compatible with the 6809, it added 2 new 8-bit registers (E and F) that could be combined to form a second 16 bit register (W), and all four 8-bit registers could form a 32 bit register (Q).
www.sasktelwebsite.net /jbayko/cpu1.html   (3414 words)

  
 Brooke's Computer page
Motorola had a program where if you contributed some 6800 assembly code to a pool of code you would be allowed to get code for the pool for free.
This pool of code was analyzed by Motorola and the 6809 had a more orthogonal instruction set as a result.
Motorola has a chip just for doing the DMA operations that could also be programmed to move data in the RAM space.
www.pacificsites.com /~brooke/comp.shtml   (4118 words)

  
 Great Microprocessors of the Past and Present
Compatible with the 6809, it added 2 new 8-bit registers (E and F) that could be combined to form a second 16 bit register (W), and all four 8-bit registers could form a 32 bit register (Q).
Data General later switched architectures and became an early supporter of the Motorola 88K series load-store microprocessor in the AViiON Unix based systems (designers originally wanted to call it the Nova II, but that idea was rejected, so instead they reversed the name and inserted the II in the middle, switching upper and lower case).
Later, Motorola designed a successor called Coldfire (early 1995), in which complex instructions and addressing modes (added to the 68020) were removed and the instruction set was recoded, simplifying it at the expense of compatibility (source only, not binary) with the 680x0 line.
laguna.fmedic.unam.mx /~daniel/up/docs/varios/cpu.html   (16694 words)

  
 cpu-collection.de >> 680x >> Motorola
The 6800 processor was released by Motorola in 1974, shortly after the Intel 8080.
Like the Intel 8080 it was designed as an enhancement of the Intel 8008 but is not technically based on it.
This chip is an engineering sample, in the early days Motorola used XC prefix for engineering prototypes, this prefix was changed to "PC" for more recent processor families.
www.cpu-collection.de /?tn=0&l0=cl&l1=680x&l2=Motorola   (282 words)

  
 SB-Projects: sbasm, crosses, 6809
The 6809 is equipped with 2 stack pointers.
Pushing a byte to the stack on a 6809 is done by decrementing the stack pointer first and then the data is stored at the location pointed to by the stack pointer in use.
The 6809 takes this concept even further and allows the direct page to be in any specific memory page by storing the page number in the DP register.
www.sbprojects.com /sbasm/6809.htm   (2412 words)

  
 Computer Closet Collection - Computers by CPU
North Star Horizon (as shipped; could also run other CPUs)
Smoke Signal Broadcasting Chieftain (could also run 6809)
Convergent Technologies WorkSlate (Hitachi 6303, CMOS version of Motorola 6800)
www.computercloset.org /ComputersbyCPU.htm   (98 words)

  
 ciforth for the 6809   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Forth for the Motorola 6809 is based on the 4.0.0 release of lina Forth for Intel Linux It is intended for a single board computer, and so it is only a source distribution, with sample configurations for ROM and RAM versions.
There is a chapter about the Forth 6809 assembler in the manual of lina.
The 6809 assembler is part of the assembler package, a generic assembler with plug ins.
home.hccnet.nl /a.w.m.van.der.horst/m6809forth.html   (330 words)

  
 Computer Glossary : software hardware Internet Intranet network software multimedia 3D design e-commerce and security
The 6809 had two 8-bit {accumulator}s, rather than one in the 6502, and could combine them into a single 16-bit register.
The 6809 was source compatible with the 6800, even though the 6800 had 78 instructions and the 6809 only had around 59 (including a {SEX} instruction).
The 6809 was used in the UK "{Dragon 32}" {personal computer} and was followed by the {Motorola 68000}.
www.di.com.tn /computerglossary/F7818.html   (235 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The first version ("OS-9 Level One"), which dates back to 1979-80, was written in assembly language for the Motorola 6809 CPU, and provided a single 64KB address space in which all processes ran.
In 1983, OS-9/6809 was ported to Motorola 68000 assembly language and extended (called OS-9/68K); and a still later (1989) version was rewritten mostly in C for further portability.
OS-9/6809 ran on Motorola EXORbus systems using the Motorola 6809, SS-50 and SS-50C bus systems from companies such as SWTPC, Tano, Gimix, Midwest Scientific, and Smoke Signal Broadcasting, STD-bus 6809 systems from several suppliers, personal computers such as the Fujitsu FM-7 and FM-77, and many others.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=OS-9   (1481 words)

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