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Topic: Motorola 88000


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In the News (Mon 22 Apr 19)

  
  Motorola 88000 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The 88000 (m88k for short) is a microprocessor design produced by Motorola.
This was some two years after its competition in the form of the SPARC and MIPS, and the 88000 never managed to catch on.
Motorola released a series of motherboards for making "out of the box" systems based on the 88000, known as the MVME series, as well as the interesting Series 900 stackable computers.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Motorola_88000   (651 words)

  
 Motorola 88000
The 88000 was Motorola's attempt at a home-grown RISC (now often referred to as a load-store) design, started in the 1980s.
Originally called the 78000 as a homage to their famed 68000 series, the design went though a tortured development path, including the name change, before finally emerging in 1988.
It was a pure 32-bit system, using a true Harvard architecture with completely separate data and address busses (and caches), had a small but powerful command set, and –like all Motorola CPUs– did not use memory segmentation.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/m/mo/motorola_88000.html   (517 words)

  
 Motorola 68012 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The Motorola MC68012 processor is a 16/32-bit microprocessor from the early 1980s.
It is a 84-pin PGA version of the Motorola MC68010.
The memory space was extended to 2GB and an RMC pin was added.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Motorola_68012   (69 words)

  
 MacKiDo/History/whats_aim   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Motorola was slowly losing their lead in CISC processors -- for the first 10 years the 68000's were far superior to the Intel processors (during the 1980's), but the lead was narrowing.
So Motorola was making the jump to RISC with the 88000, and it was performing well, but the market is never enthused about a loss of backward compatibility.
Motorola had the 88000 processor completed and had the I/O support chips for the 88000 done as well (necessary to really sell a processor).
www.mackido.com /History/whats_aim.html   (2405 words)

  
 Motorola 6809 - Computing Reference - eLook.org
The 6809 was a major advance over both its predecessor, the Motorola 6800 and also over the 6502.
The 6809 had two 8-bit accumulators, rather than one in the 6502, and could combine them into a single 16-bit register.
The 6809 was used in the UK "Dragon 32" personal computer and was followed by the Motorola 68000.
www.elook.org /computing/motorola-6809.htm   (204 words)

  
 AIM alliance
AIM was an alliance formed between Apple Computer, IBM and Motorola to create a new computing standard based on the PowerPC architechture.
PReP was in fact a barely-modified version of IBM's existing RS/6000 platform, changed only to support the new bus style of the PowerPC (based on the Motorola 88000).
Efforts on the part of Motorola and IBM to popularize PReP/CHRP failed when Apple consistently (and deliberately) did not provide a version of the Mac OS that could run on it.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ai/AIM_alliance.html   (218 words)

  
 Electronic News: Motorola PowerPC deal with Ford raises questions on 88K RISC fate - Motorola's 88000 reduced ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Rather than turning to work done for the 88K, Motorola plans to re-use peripheral cells originally developed for the 68300 CPU, and is also starting development work of flash memory cells for use on PowerPC circuits.
Motorola expects a ratio of at least one PowerPC for every Ford vehicle built, although volume purchases are not scheduled to begin until the end of the decade.
Wilkie and other Motorola executives stopped short of saying PowerPC would replace the 88K in all future design considerations, and Tom Mace, president and CEO of 88open, said future 88K iterations are "in discussion and design activities." Nevertheless, he confirmed a restructuring at the consortium while indicating its budget has been cut.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0EKF/is_n1964_v39/ai_13901767   (821 words)

  
 IBM on Apple/Intel and the G5 - Page 2 - Mac Forums   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
I recall that NEXT was in line to use Motorola's 88000 RISC processor (as was Ford for an imbedded version), but that processor died when the three (IBM, Apple, Motorola) created the PPC, which was, at the time, a single chip version of the POWER Processor.
Motorola at that time was top notch in microcontrollers and microprocessors, and did an amazing job of putting the POWER instruction set on the single chip.
Whatever happened to Motorola since the intro of the G4, everybody should at least note that there was quite a long period of time in the 80's and 90's when Motorola was king of the hill in performance.
www.chaosmint.com /forums/showthread.php?p=492335   (2416 words)

  
 Great Microprocessors of the Past and Present   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Data General later switched architectures and became an early supporter of the Motorola 88K series load-store microprocessor in the AViiON Unix based systems (designers originally wanted to call it the Nova II, but that idea was rejected, so instead they reversed the name and inserted the II in the middle, switching upper and lower case).
Later, Motorola designed a successor called Coldfire (early 1995), in which complex instructions and addressing modes (added to the 68020) were removed and the instruction set was recoded, simplifying it at the expense of compatibility (source only, not binary) with the 680x0 line.
The C100 was a three-chip set like the Motorola 88000 (but predating it by two years), with a Harvard architecture CPU and separate MMU/cache chips for instruction and data.
bwrc.eecs.berkeley.edu /CIC/archive/cpu_history.html   (15782 words)

  
 Motorola 88000   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Originally called the 78000 as a hommage to their famed 68000 series, the design went though a tortured development path (including the name change) before finally emerging in 1988.
It was a pure 32-bit system, using a true Harvard architecture with completely separate data and address busses (and caches), had a small but powerful command set, and --like all Motorola CPUs-- did not use memory segmentation.
In the late 1980's several companies were actively watching the 88000 for future use, including NeXT and Apple, but both gave up by the time the 88110 was available in 1990.
brandt.kurowski.net /projects/lsa/wiki/view.cgi?doc=207   (418 words)

  
 RoughlyDrafted
In order to keep parity with Motorola, who had started with a better design, and yet still maintain compatibility with the 8088, Intel had to design increasingly complex processors.
PC sales funded increasing x86 research and development on a scale that began to overshadow the rest of the world, causing Apple to worry that Motorola would not be able to keep up in the technology race alone.
Somewhat ironically, Apple decided to partner with IBM in designing a new family of processors, using some of the 88000 technology Motorola and Apple had started work on, and adding in a scaled-down version of IBM's 64-bit POWER architecture.
www.roughlydrafted.com /July05.whynointel2.html   (627 words)

  
 Apple and IBM Power ahead together - Forums powered by UBB.threads�
Motorola was looking at Apple using the 88000 to replace the aging 68000 series (which by that time had so many problems that the 68050 never shipped, and they skipped from the 68040 directly to the 68060 which never really shipped in volume.
Motorola's intent was to add a graphics processing unit and eventually a true vector processing unit (or a couple of each) into the 88000.
Maybe it was because the 88000 was such a poor performer (many of its execution units simply stunk!).
www.macworld.com /forums/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=newsthread&Number=281830&page=0&view=collapsed   (4310 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Data General AViiON
Earlier AViiON models used the Motorola 88000 CPU, but later models moved to an all-Intel solution when Motorola stopped work on the 88000 in the early 1990s.
In 1992 Motorola joined the AIM alliance to develop "cut down" versions of the IBM POWER CPU design into a single-chip CPU for desktop machines.
DG at this point gave up working with Motorola, and decided instead to go "all commodity", and use i386 based CPUs from Intel instead.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Data_General_AViiON   (574 words)

  
 Motorola 88000 - TheBestLinks.com - Apple Computer, CPU, Intel, MIT, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Motorola 88000 - TheBestLinks.com - Apple Computer, CPU, Intel, MIT,...
88000, Motorola 88000, Apple Computer, CPU, Intel, MIT, Microprocessor...
You can add this article to your own "watchlist" and receive e-mail notification about all changes in this page.
www.thebestlinks.com /88000.html   (546 words)

  
 Citations: MC88100 RISC Microprocessor User's Manual (ResearchIndex)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Motorola, MC 88100 RISC Microprocessor User's Manual, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1989.
Talisman maintains models of the memory system, the instruction cache and data cache, the translation lookaside buffer, the execution pipeline and the write buffer (a three element FIFO) The timing model in Talisman was calibrated against the Meerkat 1 hardware prototype [35] Through the use....
It is simulated with cache hit rates of 80 and 95, modeling first level caches of 4K and 32K bytes, respectively[11] Four configurations are modeled, and are referred to as Lhr(hl,ml) where Lhr stands for lockup free caches with a hit rate of hr, and hl and ml are hit and miss latencies,....
citeseer.ist.psu.edu /context/52681/0   (2071 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
I believe NeXT was planning >on the 88000 and had some prototypes going when they decided that the >hardware business was not for them, which was around '92 as I recall.
Motorola had the 88000, but is needed a performance boost.
The idea was that combining some of the architectural features of the 10K with Motorola's base 88K silicon, both companies could come out way ahead.
www.umich.edu /~archive/apollo/csa-archive/0229/22945   (208 words)

  
 NEWS ANALYSIS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The 88000 has not fared well in the RISC processor arena, losing market share to Sun's SPARC and MIPS R3000 architectures.
Motorola's last hope for the 88000 was major support from Apple.
Giving Motorola the manufacturing rights for the RS/6000 single-chip implementation is a concession from Apple and a way to maintain its good relationship with Motorola.
www.simson.net /nextworld/NextWorld_Extra/91.09.Sept.NWE/91.09.Sept.NWExtra08.html   (901 words)

  
 Motorola's 88000 Family Architecture   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The initial members of the 88000 family of high-performance 32-bit microprocessor are the 88100 processor and the 88200 cache and memory management unit (CMMU).
The overall design process for the 88000 family is described, and the integer instructions are discussed.
Some data on the use of the instruction set by the available compilers and the efficiency of the cache and memory systems are presented.
csdl2.computer.org /persagen/DLAbsToc.jsp?resourcePath=/dl/mags/mi/&toc=comp/mags/mi/1990/03/m3toc.xml&DOI=10.1109/40.56325   (470 words)

  
 Comp.compilers: GNU CC port to the Motorola 88000
Comp.compilers: GNU CC port to the Motorola 88000
GNU CC port to the Motorola 88000 creedonn@ul.ie (1992-11-27)
GNU CC port to the Motorola 88000 meissner@osf.org (1992-11-30)
compilers.iecc.com /comparch/article/92-11-159   (463 words)

  
 Technology Milestone: "Motorola’s 32-bit 88000 series of RISC microprocessors offering processing speeds of up to 17 ...
Technology Milestone: "Motorola’s 32-bit 88000 series of RISC microprocessors offering processing speeds of up to 17 million instructions per second"
Motorola’s 32-bit 88000 series of RISC microprocessors offering processing speeds of up to 17 million instructions per second
The Motorola 88000 (originally named the 78000) is a 32 bit processor, one of the first load-store CPUs based on a Harvard architecture (the same as the Fairchild/Intergraph Clipper C100 (1986) beat it by 2 years).
www.ciber.com /ciber/30years/more.cfm?dataid=130&id=80   (133 words)

  
 David's DG AViiONs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Most of that haul went to my group in Motorola for use as X terminals, but some, like the 5000, weren't terribly useful to us.
The Motorola 88000 architecture is worth a look.
The latched bus was lifted from the 88k family when Motorola designed the single-chip PowerPC (from IBM's multi-chip POWER layout).
www.wolfeden.org /~davidw/computers/aviions.html   (275 words)

  
 MOU from FOLDOC
Handling this properly is rare, but it can help make a WIMP environment much more usable, assuming the users are familiar with the behaviour of the user interface.
Previous: Motorola 68LC040, Motorola 88000, Motorola, Inc., mount, Mouse, mouse, mouse ahead
Previous: Motorola 88000, Motorola, Inc., mount, Mouse, mouse, mouse ahead, mouse around
www.instantweb.com /d/dictionary/foldoc.cgi?query=MOU   (1659 words)

  
 Motorola 88000 - OneLook Dictionary Search   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
We found 2 dictionaries with English definitions that include the word Motorola 88000:
Tip: Click on the first link on a line below to go directly to a page where "Motorola 88000" is defined.
Motorola 88000 : Free On-line Dictionary of Computing [home, info]
www.onelook.com /cgi-bin/cgiwrap/bware/dofind.cgi?word=Motorola+88000   (81 words)

  
 Motorola 68060 - Computing Reference - eLook.org
A 32-bit microprocessor from Motorola, the successor to the Motorola 68040.
It has 2 to 3 times the performance of the 68040.
The 68060 is probably the last development from Motorola in the high performacnce 680x0 series.
www.elook.org /computing/motorola-68060.htm   (92 words)

  
 badabada.org: Operating Systems for m88k   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
These derivates in turn mostly were based on Motorola's port of System V UNIX to the m88k architecture (SysV/88k).
The first version of Motorola's own port of System V Unix to run on its m88k-based System, only supports 88100-based configurations though.
The next major release of Motorola Unix, now supporting the newer 88110-based computers and a much more advanced userland.
badabada.org /os.html   (181 words)

  
 Motorola, Inc. from FOLDOC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Communication devices, computers and millions of consumer products are powered by Motorola semiconductors.
They are probably best known in the computing world for their microprocessors, including the Motorola 6800 and Motorola 68000 CISC families and Motorola 88000 RISCs, the Motorola DSP56000 digital signal processors and the PowerPC on which they collaborated.
Nearby terms: Motorola 68HC11 « Motorola 68LC040 « Motorola 88000 « Motorola, Inc. » mount » Mouse » mouse
foldoc.org /?Motorola   (120 words)

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